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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | October 15, 2020


Bats save energy by reducing energetically costly immune functions during annual migration
A team of scientists led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) investigated whether and how the immune response changes between pre-migration and migration seasons in the Nathusius pipistrelle bat.
Machine learning uncovers potential new TB drugs
Using a machine-learning approach that incorporates uncertainty, MIT researchers identified several promising compounds that target a protein required for the survival of the bacteria that cause tuberculosis.
New bioprosthetic valve for TAVR fails to demonstrate non-inferiority
In a randomized clinical trial, SCOPE II, a new self-expanding bioprosthetic valve used in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) failed to demonstrate non-inferiority compared to an existing self-expanding valve.
Does science have a plastic problem? Microbiologists take steps to reducing plastic waste
A research group based at the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute, developed an approach to reduce plastic waste produced by their lab.
Personality traits affect shelter at home compliance
A worldwide survey conducted during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic found that people with certain common personality traits were less likely to shelter at home when government policies were less restrictive, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
Chronic disease and public health failures fuel COVID-19 pandemic
Australia was not spared as a 30-year global rise in chronic illness and related risk factors such as obesity, high blood sugar, and outdoor air pollution created a perfect storm to fuel coronavirus (COVID-19) deaths, new research shows.
Review of proposed FDA regulation reveals the extent of financial ties to industry
A review of public comments on a proposed FDA regulatory framework, for modifications to artificial intelligence and machine learning-based software as a medical device, has found that 63% came from parties with financial ties to industry, and that the majority, 86% did not cite any scientific evidence.
Healthy skepticism: People may be wary of health articles on crowdsourced sites
People may be skeptical about medical and health articles they encounter on crowdsourced websites, such as Wikipedia and Wikihealth, according to researchers.
New study to assess pandemic's impact on Canadian veterans and their spouses
Lawson Health Research Institute and the Centre of Excellence on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are partnering with a population at high risk of mental illness - Canadian Veterans and spouses of Canadian Veterans - to study how they have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.
Remembering novelty
The brain and its functions still pose many open questions.
New research could help millions who suffer from 'ringing in the ears'
In the largest clinical trial of its kind, researchers show that combining sound and electrical stimulation of the tongue can significantly reduce tinnitus, commonly described as 'ringing in the ears.' They also found that therapeutic effects can be sustained for up to 12 months post-treatment.
Study reveals the influence of race correction in kidney disease care
Results have implications for timely kidney disease management, referral to nephrology, and dialysis planning.
Magnetic fields on the moon are the remnant of an ancient core dynamo
An international simulation study by scientists from the US, Australia, and Germany, shows that alternative explanatory models such as asteroid impacts do not generate sufficiently large magnetic fields.
What fuels the beating heart? Study reveals nutrients used by normal and failing hearts
A team led by scientists in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has produced a detailed picture of fuel and nutrient use by the human heart.
Lie detection -- Have the experts got it wrong?
Researchers led by the University of Portsmouth carried out a critical analysis of the Model Statement lie detection technique and the results have been published today in the Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling.
Cartilage-Inspired, Lipid-Based and Super Slippery Synthetic Hydrogels
Drawing inspiration from the mechanisms that lubricate the cartilage in our joints over a lifetime of wear, researchers designed extremely slippery hydrogels with self-renewing, lipid-based boundary layers, which result in a near 100-fold reduction in friction and wear over other hydrogels.
Glutathione precursor GlyNAC reverses premature aging in people with HIV
Supplementation of precursors of glutathione, a major antioxidant produced by the body, improves multiple deficits associated with premature aging in people with HIV.
Reelin regulates proliferation and migration of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells
Secreted protein Reelin is famous for its role in the migration and morphogenesis of neurons.
Facebook users spread Russian propaganda less often when they know source
Russia uses Facebook and other social media to polarize Americans, particularly those at the extreme ends of the political spectrum.
Researchers develop framework to identify health impacts of self-driving vehicles
Autonomous vehicles (AV) are the wave of the future in the automobile industry, and there's extensive discussion about the impacts on transportation, society, the economy and the environment.
New test can target and capture most lethal cells in fatal brain cancer
A laboratory test developed by a research team led by Johns Hopkins University bioengineers can accurately pinpoint, capture and analyze the deadliest cells in the most common and aggressive brain cancer in adults.
Results from the MITHRAS trial reported at TCT Connect and published in Circulation
The MITHRAS randomized clinical trial found that interventional closure of an iatrogenic atrial septal defect (iASD) driven by transcatheter mitral valve repair (TMVR) was not superior to conservative medical treatment with regard to the primary endpoint of change in six-minute walking distance.
New study: Forests are still underrated as allies to curb rural poverty
In the face of the Covid-19 pandemic and the mounting threat of climate change, forests and trees are vital for the rural poor in countries around the world.
Nudges with machine learning triples advanced care conversations among cancer patients
An electronic nudge to clinicians--triggered by an algorithm that used machine learning methods to flag patients with cancer who would most benefit from a conversation around end-of-life goals--tripled the rate of those discussions.
Researchers deconstruct the "biological clock" that regulates birdsong
The precise timing of a bird's complex song is driven in part by the often-ignored ''wires'' connecting neurons in the bird's brain, according to a new study.
Study identifies gene variants to help personalize treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis
A group of three gene variants, commonly inherited together, may provide clues to more successful treatment of pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a chronic inflammation of the food pipe often confused with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).
NTU Singapore scientists develop 'mini-brains' to help robots recognize pain and to self-repair
Using a brain-inspired approach, scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a way for robots to have the artificial intelligence (AI) to recognise pain and to self-repair when damaged.
Standalone D-dimer test strategy may simplify diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis
New research suggests that it may be possible to simplify the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) without compromising accuracy.
Rare congenital heart defect rescued by protease inhibition
A research team at the Greenwood Genetic Center (GGC) has successfully used small molecules to restore normal heart and valve development in an animal model for Mucolipidosis II (ML II), a rare genetic disorder.
Deep learning artificial intelligence keeps an eye on volcano movements
RADAR satellites can collect massive amounts of remote sensing data that can detect ground movements -- surface deformations -- at volcanoes in near real time.
All-terrain microrobot flips through a live colon
A rectangular robot as tiny as a few human hairs can travel throughout a colon by doing back flips, Purdue University engineers have demonstrated in live animal models.
Supergene discovery leads to new knowledge of fire ants
A unique study conducted by University of Georgia entomologists led to the discovery of a distinctive supergene in fire ant colonies that determines whether young queen ants will leave their birth colony to start their own new colony or if they will join one with multiple queens.
Vanderbilt researchers make counterintuitive discoveries about immune-like characteristics of cells
Biologists reveal that tissue perturbations by chemotherapy agents promote stem cell expansion and that fibroblast cells exhibit unexpected, immune-like behavior.
It cures acne, afib, anxiety? CBD users think its real medicine, contrary to evidence
A new study published in JAMA Network Open finds that as many as 90 percent of CBD users think it's real medicine, taking CBD to treat nearly all medical conditions, including substance use withdrawal, atrial fibrillation, and erectile dysfunction, to name a few.
Supersized alcopops linked to homelessness and gang affiliation, new regulation needed
New George Mason University study of adults on probation finds that those who were gang-affiliated or recently experienced homelessness were far more likely to have recently consumed high alcohol content, flavored 'supersized alcopop' beverages in the past 30 days.
Monkey study suggests that they, like humans, may have 'self-domesticated'
Asif Ghazanfar led a team of scientists who determined that changing an infant monkey's verbal development also changed a physical marker of domesticity: a patch of white fur on its forehead.
Oral, poster abstracts take center stage at ObesityWeek® Interactive
Scientists from across the globe will present the latest research in obesity science and medicine and related topics at the 38th Annual Meeting of The Obesity Society (TOS) at ObesityWeek® Interactive.
Study: Medicaid and adults on the autism spectrum
Using administrative data from the Medicaid Analytic eXtract (MAX), researchers from Drexel University's A.J.
Sprinkled with power: How impurities enhance a thermoelectric material at the atomic level
Magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) is a thermoelectric material that can convert heat into electricity.
E-cigarettes might not be safe alternative in reducing harm to babies
E-cigarettes might not be a safer alternative to smoking during pregnancy, according to the first known study into the effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on babies.
Novel antiviral strategy for treatment of COVID-19
A research team led by Professor Hongzhe SUN, Norman & Cecilia Yip Professor in Bioinorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, and Professor Kwok Yung YUEN, Henry Fok Professor in Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), has discovered a novel antiviral strategy for treatment of COVID-19.
Repurposing drugs for a pan-coronavirus treatment
The study identifies drug targets common to all three coronaviruses (SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1, and MERS-CoV) and potential drugs that could be repurposed as COVID-19 treatments.
New national poll: Biden leads Trump by 10
Former Vice President Joe Biden has a 10-point lead over President Donald Trump in the contest for the White House in a new national poll of likely voters released today by the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion.
NASA finds wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Nangka post-landfall
Tropical Storm Nangka made landfall south of Haiphong, Vietnam and began to weaken.
Research finds that blue-light glasses improve sleep and workday productivity
During the pandemic, the amount of screen time for many people working and learning from home as well as binge-watching TV has sharply increased.
Upgraded GMRT measures the mass of hydrogen in distant galaxies
A team of astronomers from the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics Pune, and the Raman Research Institute (RRI), Bengaluru, has used the upgraded GMRT to measure the atomic hydrogen content of galaxies 8 billion years ago.
Laser technology measures biomass in world's largest trees
Laser technology has been used to measure the volume and biomass of giant Californian redwood trees for the first time, records a new study by UCL researchers.
Will the COVID-19 virus become endemic?
A new article in the journal Science by Columbia Mailman School researchers Jeffrey Shaman and Marta Galanti explores the potential for the COVID-19 virus to become endemic, a regular feature producing recurring outbreaks in humans.
Swallowing, communication management of tracheostomy, laryngectomy in context of COVID-19
This review synthesizes the literature regarding tracheostomy and laryngectomy management in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Early trauma influences metabolism across generations
A study by the Brain Research Institute at UZH reveals that early trauma leads to changes in blood metabolites - similarly in mice and humans.
Anemic star cluster breaks metal-poor record
In a surprising discovery, astronomers using two Maunakea Observatories - W.
Researchers step toward understanding how toxic PFAS chemicals spread from release sites
New lab studies are helping researchers to better understand how so called ''forever chemicals'' behave in soil and water, which can help in understanding how these contaminants spread.
A fraction of global COVID-19 stimulus funds could aid climate change efforts
A modest fraction of worldwide COVID-19 economic stimulus package funds--which have surpassed USD 12 trillion to date--could help put the world on track to Paris Agreement goals for the climate, say Marina Andrijevic and colleagues in this Policy Forum.
Monash engineers improve fatigue life of high strength aluminium alloys by 25 times
A world-first study by Monash University engineers has demonstrated improvements in the fatigue life of high strength aluminium alloys by 25 times -- a significant outcome for the transport manufacturing industry.
Researchers develop a plant-based thermotherapy patch
A team of researchers at Tampere University, Finland, has developed a biodegradable, transparent, flexible and fast-acting thermotherapy patch from plant leaves.
Pancreatic cancer: Subtypes with different aggressiveness discovered
To date, no targeted personalized therapies for pancreatic cancer exist.
Reelin-Nrp1 interaction regulates neocortical dendrite development
Reelin exhibits a context-dependent function during brain development; however, its underlying mechanism is not well understood.
Oncotarget: Exosomal lncRNA PCAT-1 promotes Kras-associated chemoresistance
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 29 reported that Immunosuppressive chemoresistance is a major burden in lung cancer.
Small RNA as a central player in infections
The most important pathogenicity factors of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori are centrally regulated by a small RNA molecule, NikS.
UT Southwestern leads national efforts around childhood blood disorders
When a child has a rare blood disorder, clinicians can struggle to find the best diagnostic and treatment methods.
Bisexual adults less likely to enjoy health benefits of education
Education has long been linked to health -- the more schooling people have, the healthier they are likely to be.
Researchers question the existence of the social brain as a separate system
A team of Russian researchers with the participation of a leading researcher at HSE University, Ekaterina Pechenkova, found that during group problem solving the components of the social brain are co-activated, but they do not increase their coupling during cooperation as would be suggested for a holistic network.
Scientists discover a new mechanism for cellular defense against viral and bacterial infections
Researchers of IDIBAPS, the University of Barcelona and CNIC have coordinated a study, published in Science, which describes a new mechanism of innate immunity by which cells fight viruses and bacteria.
New study reveals how the nervous system mutes or boosts sensory information to make behavioral deci
Fruit flies may be able to teach researchers a thing or two about artificial intelligence.
Engineered developmental signals could illuminate regenerative medicine
For a tiny embryo to develop into an adult organism, its cells must develop in precise patterns and interact with their neighbors in carefully orchestrated ways.
Synthego's CRISPR platform enables faster ID of potential Coronavirus treatment
Synthego, the genome engineering company, has collaborated with The Krogan Lab, a world-renowned scientific research unit at the Quantitative Biosciences Institute (QBI) at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), to deliver multiple CRISPR-based engineered cell lines to accelerate the study of potential treatment targets for SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 disease.
Results from the REFLECT II Trial reported at TCT Connect
The REFLECT II randomized clinical trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of a device designed to reduce cerebral embolization and ischemic stroke, complications of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), found that the device met the primary safety endpoint compared to historical controls but did not demonstrate superiority of the device for the primary hierarchical efficacy endpoint.
Examining CBD use for conditions with proven therapies
Testimonials posted on a social media site were analyzed to examine whether individuals are using the cannabis-derived chemical compound cannabidiol (CBD) in an attempt to treat diagnosable conditions that have evidence-based therapies.
Australian carp virus plan 'dead in the water'
Plans to release a virus to reduce numbers of invasive Common Carp in Australia are unlikely to work and should be dropped, researchers say.
New tool enables easy, effective disease tracking
Published today in the journal GigaScience is a new open source, cloud-based tool called IDseq that makes it possible to rapidly detect, identify, and track emerging pathogens such as SARS-CoV-2.
Report finds COVID-19 rate among dentists is less than one percent
Fewer than one percent of dentists nationwide were found to be COVID-19 positive, according to a first-of-its-kind report in the US based on data collected in June 2020.
When feeling the pinch, nuclei instigate cells to escape crowded spaces
The threat of serious deformation triggers a rapid escape reflex that enables cells to move away and squeeze out from tight spaces or crowded tissues.
Golden meat: Engineering cow cells to produce beta carotene
Scientists exploit carotenoid pathway used in golden rice to grow nutritionally enhanced, cell-cultured meat.
Ingestible capsule that could help demystify the gut-brain axis
A team of University of Maryland experts from engineering, neuroscience, applied microbiology, and physics has been making headway on building a platform that can monitor and model the real-time processing of gut microbiome serotonin activity.
Classic optical illusion leads to the discovery of critical neurons in zebrafish.
By exposing larval zebrafish to a well-known optical illusion, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology and National Institute of Genetics have found a clever way to isolate key clusters of neurons critical to processing the direction of motion in the zebrafish's environment.
Astrocytes build synapses after cocaine use in mice
Drugs of abuse, like cocaine, are so addictive due in part to their cellular interaction, creating strong cellular memories in the brain that promote compulsive behaviors.
Survey: More US Adults want the government to have a bigger role in improving peoples' lives than before the pandemic
The share of US adults who support an active government role in society increased by more than 40 percent during the initial pandemic response--up from 24 percent in September 2019 to 34 percent in April 2020.
Stressed out volcanoes more likely to collapse and erupt, study finds
An international study led by Monash scientists has discovered how volcanoes experience stress.
Low-metallicity globular star cluster challenges formation models
On the outskirts of the nearby Andromeda Galaxy, researchers have unexpectedly discovered a globular cluster (GC) - a massive congregation of relic stars - with a very low abundance of chemical elements heavier than hydrogen and helium (known as its metallicity), according to a new study.
Better measures reveal more COVID-19 smell loss
Smell loss is a prime symptom of COVID-19 but reports of prevalence vary from study to study, ranging from 5% to 98%.
A new ultrafast control scheme of ferromagnet for energy-efficient data storage
Using a single laser pulse that did not switch the ferrimagnetic layer, researchers demonstrated a much faster and less energy consuming switching of the ferromagnet.
Phosphate polymer forms a cornerstone of metabolic control
In a changing climate, understanding how organisms respond to stress conditions is increasingly important.
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Preliminary results find vaccine candidate based on inactivated SARS-CoV-2 virus is safe and induces an immune response in healthy volunteers
A Chinese COVID-19 vaccine candidate based on the inactivated whole SARS-CoV-2 virus (BBIBP-CorV) is safe and elicits an antibody response, findings from a small early-phase randomised clinical trial published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal have found.
Strategic interventions in dairy production in developing countries can help meet growing global demand for milk
Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Livestock Systems hosted the ''MILK Symposium: Improving Milk Production, Quality, and Safety in Developing Countries'' at the 2019 American Dairy Science Association® Annual Meeting to address factors that cause low dairy consumption in low- and middle-income countries and discuss strategies to address them.
Climate change likely drove early human species to extinction, modeling study suggests
Of the six or more different species of early humans, all belonging to the genus Homo, only we Homo sapiens have managed to survive.
Study reveals most effective drugs for common type of neuropathic pain
More than 20 million people in the U.S. suffer neuropathic pain.
Inexpensive and rapid testing of drugs for resistant infections possible
A rapid and simple method for testing the efficacy of antibacterial drugs on infectious microbes has been developed and validated by a team of Penn State researchers.
Consistent nursing care after childbirth boosts breastfeeding rates
New parents who receive attentive, supportive nursing care during labor and immediately after childbirth are more likely to exclusively breastfeed their newborn when leaving the hospital, finds a study published in MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing.
Aetion statement on UCSF-led study to inform drug development for COVID-19, future pandemics
Aetion co-authored a study published today in Science, which examined lethal coronaviruses SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1, and MERS-CoV to identify molecular characteristics of potential treatments.
Artificial cyanobacterial biofilm can sustain green ethylene production for over a month
Ethylene is one of the most important and widely used organic chemicals.
Global study identifies common vulnerabilities across SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1 and MERS coronaviruses
There are common vulnerabilities among three lethal coronaviruses, SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV, such as frequently hijacked cellular pathways, that could lead to promising targets for broad coronavirus inhibition, according to a study by an international research team that includes scientists from the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.
Higher hypothetical disease risk linked with greater willingness to vaccinate
A survey of US adults showed that as local case counts of a hypothetical disease increased -- indicating increased risk of infection -- the proportion of people willing to receive a vaccine for the disease also increased.
FSU researchers find diverse communities comprise bacterial mats threatening coral reefs
A Florida State University research team found that cyanobacterial mats threatening the health of coral reefs are more diverse and complex than scientists previously knew.
University of South Carolina research finds trigger that leads to faster nerve healing
Damaged nerves regenerate faster when protein clusters are broken apart, releasing mRNAs that can be used to rebuild the nerve.
Star clusters are only the tip of the iceberg
Star clusters have been part of the Imaginarium of human civilization for millennia.
Ultrasound technique offers more precise, quantified assessments of lung health
Researchers have developed a technique that uses ultrasound to provide non-invasive assessments of pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary edema.
Cows prefer "live" co-moo-nication, study reveals
Cows enjoy the sound of a human voice -- but are more relaxed by a face-to-face chat than when listening to a recorded voice through a loudspeaker.
Removal of dairy cows from the United States may reduce essential nutrient supply with little effect on greenhouse gas emissions
A suggested solution to increasing food production worldwide while reducing greenhouse gas emissions has been to eliminate or reduce animal production in favor of plant production.
Researchers seek to end unexpected bills for screening colonoscopies
Nearly 1 in 8 commercially insured patients nationwide who underwent an elective colonoscopy between 2012 and 2017 performed by an in-network provider received ''surprise'' bills for out-of-network expenses, often totaling hundreds of dollars or more.
A new approach boosts lithium-ion battery efficiency and puts out fires, too
Building new functionality into an overlooked lithium-ion battery component addresses two major goals of battery research: extending the driving range of electric vehicles and reducing the danger that laptops, cell phones and other devices will burst into flames.
Many college students aren't tested for STIs despite high rates, self-tests offer promise
While sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are at record highs in the United States, STI testing among college students remains low.
Was Hong Kong once a coral reef paradise?
Researchers from The University of Hong Kong's School of Biological Sciences and The Swire Institute of Marine Science, have for the first time investigated the historical presence of coral communities in the Greater Bay Area, revealing a catastrophic range collapse and loss of diversity that occurred in the last several decades.
A deadly long-distance hunter: DNA study reveals insights about the scimitar-toothed cat
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have mapped the entire nuclear genome of a sabre-toothed cat.
Public health experts fear devastating impact of flu and COVID-19 on vulnerable adults
The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) issued a new Call to Action report detailing the risks of co-infection with influenza (flu) and COVID-19 in adults with chronic health conditions, and the importance of flu vaccination during the 2020-2021 season.
Study finds athletes fear being judged as weak when they experience pain or injury
Trinity College Dublin researchers have carried out the first multi-centred, international, qualitative study exploring the athlete experience (in their own words) of sporting low back pain (LBP).
Monash discoveries suggest new breast cancer treatment
Findings by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) researchers have pointed to a new combination of treatments that may help breast cancer patients with certain gene mutations.
New technology diagnoses sickle cell disease in record time
Researchers have developed a new way to diagnose diseases of the blood like sickle cell disease with sensitivity and precision and in only one minute.
Moffitt researchers discover specific molecules that promote cancer progression
In a new article published in the journal Nature Communications, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers describe how the protein TAp63 controls levels of RNA molecules, which subsequently connects the activities of p53 and AKT to promote disease progression.
Opioid prescriptions are rising in the U.K, with 14% of patients becoming long-term users
In the U.K., new prescriptions for multiple opioids have risen steadily in recent years, leading to concerning rates of long-term use, especially in older, socially deprived patients.
What was responsible for the hottest spring in eastern China in 2018?
Quantitative estimates of the probability ratio show that anthropogenic forcing may have increased the chance of this event by ten-fold, while the anomalous circulation increased it by approximately two-fold.
Mammalian lipid droplets organize and support innate host immunity
Mammalian lipid droplets -- tiny lipid-filled pockets floating amidst a cell's cytoplasm -- represent an intracellular first line of defense against microbial pathogens, researchers report.
Mapping how three lethal coronaviruses engage their hosts reveals potential drug targets
Seeking to inform development of drugs effective against multiple pathogenic human coronaviruses, David E.
Marriage or not? Rituals help dating couples decide relationship future
Rituals such as those centered around holidays and other celebrations play an important part in human relationships.
Research could change how blood pressure is managed in spinal cord injury patients
New research from the International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD) challenges the current standard for managing blood pressure in people with spinal cord injury (SCI).
AJTMH tip sheet for October 2020
Your advance look at two new studies publishing online on October 15, 2020 in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
Poor diet is top contributor to heart disease deaths globally
More than two-thirds of deaths from heart disease worldwide could be prevented with healthier diets.
What San Diego's Hepatitis A outbreak can teach us during COVID-19
The disconnect between the public and government agencies, and how information is communicated on social media during an outbreak was the focus of a study by San Diego State University researchers.
Predicting influenza epidemics
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a unique method to predict influenza epidemics by combining several sources of data.
LiU researchers first to develop an organic battery
Researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, have for the first time demonstrated an organic battery.
Australian research shows NASA's James Webb telescopes will reveal hidden galaxies
Simulations show it's possible to distinguish host galaxy from quasars, although still challenging due to the galaxy's small size on the sky.
Bark beetle outbreaks benefit wild bee populations, habitat
Researchers found significant increases in floral abundance and wild bee diversity in outbreak-affected forests, compared to similar, undisturbed forest.
Automatic decision-making prevents us harming others - new study
The processes our brains use to avoid harming other people are automatic and reflexive - and quite different from those used when avoiding harm to ourselves, according to new research.
Fraction of money earmarked for COVID-19 recovery could boost climate efforts
Global stimulus plans for economic recovery after the pandemic could easily cover climate-friendly policies, suggests new study.
Plant genetic engineering to fight 'hidden hunger'
More than two billion people worldwide suffer from micronutrient malnutrition due to deficiencies in minerals and vitamins.

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