Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 19, 2020
Natural disaster preparations may aid businesses' pandemic response
The benefits of preparing for natural disasters may extend to scenarios outside of earthquakes, hurricanes and wildfires.

A trillion turns of light nets terahertz polarized bytes
Nanophotonics researchers at Rice University, the Polytechnic University of Milan and the Italian Institute of Technology have demonstrated a novel technique for modulating light at terahertz frequencies with plasmonic metasurfaces.

Sludge-powered bacteria generate more electricity, faster
A new electroactive bacterium could help fuel wastewater treatment reactors.

The 'Goldilocks Day': the perfect day for kids' bone health
Not too little, not too much - Goldilocks' 'just right' approach can now assess children's daily activities as new research from the University of South Australia confirms the best make up of a child's day to maximise bone health and function in children.

Advancing wildlife genomics through the development of molecular methods
A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW), the Australian Museum and the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) report a new method for identifying any genome sequence located next to a known sequence.

Early-arriving endangered Chinook salmon take the brunt of sea lion predation
A new University of Washington and NOAA Fisheries study found that sea lions have the largest negative effect on early-arriving endangered Chinook salmon in the lower Columbia River.

Criteria to predict cytokine storm in COVID-19 patients identified by Temple Researchers
Researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have developed and validated predictive criteria for early identification of COVID-19 patients who are developing hyperimmune responses, raising the possibility for early therapeutic intervention.

Exercise and nutrition regimen benefits physical, cognitive health
Researchers studied the effects of a 12-week exercise regimen on 148 active-duty Air Force airmen, half of whom also received a twice-daily nutrient beverage that included protein; the omega-3 fatty acid, DHA; lutein; phospholipids; vitamin D; B vitamins and other micronutrients; along with a muscle-promoting compound known as HMB.

How cancer cells escape crowded tumors
(Vienna, 16.10.2020) When trapped in a crowded environment, cells of the human body try to escape.

Russian scientists suggested a transfer to safe nuclear energy
Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Ozersk Technological Institute, and the Russian Academy of Sciences have improved a processing technology of a monazite concentrate which is a mineral raw material employed as a source of rare earth elements and thorium.

ACP and Annals of Internal Medicine hold virtual COVID-19 vaccine forum
The American College of Physicians (ACP) and Annals of Internal Medicine hosted a virtual forum on October 16 assembling some of the country's leading health experts to discuss timely, evidence-based information related to what physicians and other health care professionals need to know about a COVID-19 vaccine.

Tough love: intense glare helps next-gen solar tech through awkward phase
Researchers have shown that high-intensity light will reverse light-induced phase segregation in mixed-halide perovskites, enabling bandgap control and maximising efficiency for potential photovoltaic applications.

Newborn brains lack maturity to process emotions as adults do
Humans aren't born with mature brain circuitry that attaches emotions to the things they see or hear in their environment, a new study shows.

Patients who had more severe covid-19 may be the best donors for convalescent plasma therapy
Sex, age, and severity of disease may be useful in identifying COVID-19 survivors who are likely to have high levels of antibodies that can protect against the disease.

Creating perfect edges in 2D-materials
Ultrathin materials such as graphene promise a revolution in nanoscience and technology.

Natural killer cells also have a memory function
Good news for the human immune system: researchers from MedUni Vienna's Departments of Dermatology and Surgery have managed to ascribe an immunological memory function to a subset of cytotoxic NK cells, which have hitherto been regarded as antigen-non-specific.

Light pollution alters predator-prey interactions between cougars and mule deer in western US
A new study provides strong evidence that exposure to light pollution alters predator-prey dynamics between mule deer and cougars across the intermountain West, a rapidly growing region where nighttime skyglow is an increasing environmental disturbance.

Sanctuary policies protect immigrants but don't threaten public safety
Stanford researcher David Hausman analyzed ICE deportations data for 296 large counties combined with FBI crime data.

Astrophysics team lights the way for more accurate model of the universe
In a study first published Aug. 5 in The Astrophysical Journal Letters, University of Texas at Dallas scientists demonstrated the first use of a method called self-calibration to remove contamination from gravitational lensing signals.

Gut bacteria could be responsible for side effect of Parkinson's drug
Bacteria in the small intestine can deaminate levodopa, the main drug that is used to treat Parkinson's disease.

Gut bacteria in multiple sclerosis: Probiotic or commensal, good or bad?
Though evidence suggests that the gut microbiome modulates risk of multiple sclerosis, new findings from the University of Vermont highlight complex interactions between host genetics and environmental factors impact susceptibility to multiple sclerosis.

Material found in house paint may spur technology revolution
The development of a new method to make non-volatile computer memory may have unlocked a problem that has been holding back machine learning and has the potential to revolutionize technologies like voice recognition, image processing and autonomous driving.

HKU physicist joins international effort to unveil the behavior of "strange metals"
An international joint research team including Dr Zi Yang MENG, Associate Professor of Department of Physics at the University of Hong Kong (HKU), has solved the puzzle of the NFL behaviour in interacting electrons systems, and provided a protocol for the establishment of new paradigms in quantum metals, through quantum many-body computation and analytical calculations.

With deep learning algorithms, standard CT technology produces spectral images
In research published today in Patterns, a team of engineers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute demonstrate how a deep learning algorithm can be applied to a conventional computerized tomography (CT) scan in order to produce images that would typically require a higher level of imaging technology known as dual-energy CT.

'Rare' brain disorder may not be so rare anymore, trends in japan reveal
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, is an important cause of dementia.

Gender inequalities accelerate during early adolescence, study finds
Early adolescence is where gender inequalities most markedly emerge, according to new research from across 40 low- and middle-income countries in Asia and the Pacific.

Ultraviolet shines light on origins of the solar system
In the search to discover the origins of our solar system, an international team of researchers, including planetary scientist and cosmochemist James Lyons of Arizona State University, has compared the composition of the sun to the composition of the most ancient materials that formed in our solar system: refractory inclusions in unmetamorphosed meteorites.

New 'green' engine for lorries ahead of the demanding anti-contamination regulation
Researchers from the Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV) have designed a new engine to decrease the environmental impact of the most common type of lorries that travel on European roads - those that weigh between 18 and 25 tonnes.

High social and ecological standards for chocolate
Worldwide demand for food from the tropics that meets higher environmental and social standards has risen sharply in recent years.

Triggerfish learns to catch more diverse food
In probably the first observation of its kind, a tricky triggerfish is seen beaching itself before attacking a crab walking along the shoreline.

Researchers discover neuroprotective treatment for chronic traumatic brain injury
TBI survivors are currently treated with extensive physical and cognitive rehabilitation, accompanied by medications that may mitigate symptoms yet do not halt or slow neurodegeneration.

CBD helps reduce lung damage from COVID by increasing levels of protective peptide
One way CBD appears to reduce the 'cytokine storm' that damages the lungs and kills many patients with COVID-19 is by enabling an increase in levels of a natural peptide called apelin, which is known to reduce inflammation and whose levels are dramatically reduced in the face of this storm.

Researching the chips of the future
The chips of the future will include photonics and electronics; they will have a bandwidth, speed and processing and computing abilities that are currently unthinkable.

The Milky Way galaxy has a clumpy halo
Astronomers at the University of Iowa have determined our galaxy is surrounded by a clumpy halo of hot gases that is continually being supplied with material ejected by birthing or dying stars.

SARS-CoV-2 infection rates in skilled nursing facilities
Researchers examined asymptomatic and presymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection rates in a large multistate sample of U.S. skilled nursing facilities and variation in case counts by SARS-CoV-2 prevalence in the counties where facilities are located.

NYU Abu Dhabi study discovers how some single-cell organisms control microbiomes
Large swaths of single-celled eukaryotes, non-bacterial single-cell organisms like microalgae, fungi or mold, can control microbiomes (a collection of tiny microbes, mostly bacteria) by secreting unusual small molecules around their cells, maintaining host survival and ecological success, according to a new study by NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Assistant Professor of Biology Shady Amin.

AI methods of analyzing social networks find new cell types in tissue
In situ sequencing enables gene activity inside body tissues to be depicted in microscope images.

NUS study reveals severe air pollution drives food delivery consumption and plastic waste
When the air outside is bad, office workers are more likely to order food delivery than go out for lunch, which in turn increases plastic waste from food packaging, according to a study by researchers from the National University of Singapore.

Immune protein orchestrates daily rhythm of squid-bacteria symbiotic relationship
New research led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa scientists revealed that, in the mutually beneficial relationship between with the Hawaiian bobtail squid and the luminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, an immune protein called ''macrophage migration inhibitory factor'' is the maestro of daily rhythms.

Mouthwashes, oral rinses may inactivate human coronaviruses
Certain oral antiseptics and mouthwashes may have the ability to inactivate human coronaviruses, according to a Penn State College of Medicine research study.

Tropical cyclones moving faster in recent decades
Tropical cyclones, regionally known as hurricanes or typhoons, have been moving across ocean basins faster since 1982, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

68% of deaths from firearms are from self-harm, majority in older men in rural regions
A new study of gun injuries and deaths in Ontario found that 68% of firearm-related deaths were from self-harm, and they most often occurred in older men living in rural regions, pointing to the need for targeted prevention efforts.

Fear of COVID-19 raises risk of depression among Soweto's deprived communities
A STUDY into the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on the mental health of people in Soweto has found a significant link between symptoms of depression and how likely people felt they were to be infected.

Tapping secrets of Aussie spider's unique silk
The basket-web spider, which is found only in Australia, has revealed it not only weaves a unique lobster pot web but that its silk has elasticity and a gluing substance, that creates a high degree of robustness.

CRISPR-induced immune diversification in host-virus populations
Just like humans, microbes have equipped themselves with tools to recognize and defend themselves against viral invaders.

Biochar helps hold water, saves money
Biochar's benefits for long-term storage of carbon and nitrogen on American farms are clear, but new research from Rice University shows it can help farmers save money on irrigation as well.

Radiative cooler that cools down even under sunlight
POSTECH-Korea University joint research team develops a non-energy consuming radiative cooling material.

'Multi-omics' adds new cell to immune family tree
Australian researchers have used powerful 'single cell multi-omics' technologies to discover a previously unknown ancestor of T and B lymphocytes, which are critical components of our immune system.

Relative restrictiveness of each state's voting environment in 2020
Texas has the most restrictive electoral environment in 2020, and Oregon has the least restrictive voting practices of the 50 states.

Driver of the largest mass extinction in the history of the Earth identified
252 million years ago, at the transition from the Permian to the Triassic epoch, most of the life forms existing on Earth became extinct.

Children with autism, ADHD have more doctor and hospital visits during infancy
Children who are later diagnosed with autism and/or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder visit doctors and hospitals more often in their first year of life than non-affected children, suggesting a potential new way to identify the conditions early.

Happy endings trip up the brain's decision-making
The brain keeps track of the value of an experience as well as how it unfolds over time; overemphasizing the ending may trigger poor decision-making, according to new research published in JNeurosci.

Magnetic field and hydrogels could be used to grow new cartilage
Instead of using synthetic materials, Penn Medicine study shows magnets could be used to arrange cells to grow new tissues

COVID-19 heightens urgency of advanced care planning, according to WVU study
West Virginia University researchers saw a sharp uptick in inquiries regarding end-of-life care in the first half of 2020, according to a study published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management.

New lab test clarifies the potential protective effects of COVID-19 antibodies
Knowing you have developed antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 virus after recovering from COVID-19 doesn't tell you everything about your immunity.

A renewable solution to keep cool in a warming world
Month-on-month, year-on-year, the world continues to experience record high temperatures.

Study discovers gene that helps us know when it's time to urinate
In a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded study involving both mice and patients who are part of an NIH Clinical Center trial, researchers discovered that a gene, called PIEZO2, may be responsible for the powerful urge to urinate that we normally feel several times a day.

Unique program aims to educate Muslim teens on HIV prevention
Cultural taboos may leave Muslim American adolescents uninformed about romantic relationships and sex, placing them at risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Improved mental and physical condition is directly linked to nutrition, study shows
New research demonstrates that the right nutrition is directly linked to physical and cognitive performance in active duty men and women in the US Air Force.

For toddlers with autism, more intervention hours are not necessarily better
Two prominent early intervention models for toddlers with autism show a very similar impact, whether delivered at 15-hours or 25-hours per week intensities, a UC Davis MIND Institute study has found.

Results from the VOYAGER PAD Trial reported at TCT Connect
A large subgroup analysis of a randomized clinical trial showed neither a mortality risk nor benefit associated with the use of paclitaxel drug-coated devices (DCD) in the treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD).

Trees bring benefits to society, regardless of their origin
Trees planted in urban spaces provide a multitude of ecosystem and social services.

Plugging in: Survey examines American perceptions of -- and resistance to -- electric vehicles
The latest installment of the Climate Insights 2020 report series finds that resistance to purchasing electric vehicles derives from a variety of sources -- and those reasons differ among some demographics.

Paper recycling must be powered by renewables to save climate
The study, published in Nature Sustainability, found that greenhouse gas emissions would increase by 2050 if we recycled more paper, as current methods rely on fossil fuels and electricity from the grid.

Infant mortality in the US remains high; here's how to spend money to save lives
Increasing state and local funding for environmental, educational and social services may lower infant mortality among those at highest risk, particularly among infants born to teenage mothers, according to findings published this week in the journal Pediatrics from researchers at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health.

Research network aims to improve learning outcomes for students underrepresented in STEM
A recent report lays out gaps in the biology education field and proposes leveraging an existing research coordination network called Equity and Diversity in Undergraduate STEM (EDU-STEM) to tackle them.

Odors as navigational cues for pigeons
Volatile organic compounds identified that can be used for olfactory navigation by homing pigeons.

Save it or spend it? Advertising decisions amid consumer word-of-mouth
Most people have seen or heard from a friend, neighbor or family member about a product or service they've used and how their experience was.

Significant link found between air pollution and neurological disorders
Air pollution was significantly associated with an increased risk of hospital admissions for several neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and other dementias, in a large, long-term study of US adults.

How rain can move mountains
Scientists have long thought that rainfall has a dramatic effect on the evolution of mountainous landscapes, but the reasons for how and why have been elusive.

Showcasing successful women's STEM achievements, a social vaccine against gender stereotypes
In a study published in the open access journal Frontiers in Psychology, a team of researchers led by the director of the GenTIC (Gender and ICT) research group at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (IN3), Milagros Sáinz, have demonstrated the impact of female role models in influencing girls' preferences for studying STEM subjects.

Changes in blood metabolite profile are visible years before diagnosis of alcohol-related disease
A new study from the University of Eastern Finland is the first in the world to show that the serum metabolite profile can be used to identify individuals likely at risk of developing an alcohol-related disease in the future.

Rutgers finds new way to personalize treatments for prostate cancer
Rutgers researchers have discovered human gene markers that work together to cause metastatic prostate cancer - cancer that spreads beyond the prostate.

Keeping weight off is up to your brain, not just willpower, Ben-Gurion U researchers discover
'To our surprise, we discovered that while higher executive functions, as measured behaviorally, were dominant factors in weight loss, this was not reflected in patterns of brain connectivity,' says Gidon Levakov, a graduate student, who led the study from the BGU Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences.

A first-of-its-kind catalyst mimics natural processes to break down plastics
A team of scientists led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has developed a first-of-its-kind catalyst that is able to process polyolefin plastics, types of polymers widely used in things like plastic grocery bags, milk jugs, shampoo bottles, toys, and food containers.

Projecting favorable perceptions of space
For anthropologists and other social scientists, the space race in the 1950s served as a period of cultural and technological transformation as well as an opportunity to advance the public good.

New evidence found of the ritual significance of a classic Maya sweat bath in Guatemala
An unusual offering in an abandoned and unique-looking Maya sweat bath revealed new evidence of the role it played in the community

New model of human brain 'conversations' could inform research on brain disease, cognition
A team of Indiana University neuroscientists has built a new model of human brain networks that sheds light on how the brain functions.

What lies between grey and white in the brain
A multidisciplinary team led by Nikolaus Weiskopf from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) has succeeded in making the superficial white matter visible in the living human brain.

Nursing home residents with cognitive impairment more likely to be admitted to hospital
Transfers from the nursing home to the emergency department (ED) or the hospital can have negative longer-term impact on the health of older adults.

COVID-19 pandemic has dramatic impact on osteoporosis management, finds new global study
A new study published prior to World Osteoporosis Day finds that the COVID-19 pandemic, which has severely affected management of non-communicable diseases, is markedly impacting the management of osteoporosis as judged by access to online FRAX fracture risk assessments.

An ultrasonic projector for medicine
A chip-based technology that modulates intensive sound pressure profiles with high resolution opens up new possibilities for ultrasound therapy.

Hesitancy about a COVID-19 vaccine is linked to beliefs about origin of the virus
More than a third of people (34%) in Turkey and one sixth of people (17%) in the UK are 'hesitant' about a COVID-19 vaccine, according to a study by UCL and Dokuz Eylul University in Turkey.

Glimpse deep into Earth's crust finds heat source that may stabilize continents
Rocks from the Rio Grande continental rift have provided a rare snapshot of active geology deep inside Earth's crust, revealing new evidence for how continents remain stable over billions of years, according to a team of scientists.

The right cells in the right spot
Neurons in a visual brain area of zebrafish are arranged as a map for catching prey.

Scientists map the human proteome
Twenty years after the release of the human genome, the genetic 'blueprint' of human life, an international research team, including the University of British Columbia's Chris Overall, has now mapped the first draft sequence of the human proteome.

University of Sydney research could lead to customised cochlear implants
A School of Biomedical Engineering researcher has analysed the accuracy of predictions for cochlear implant outcomes, with a view to further improve their performance in noisy environments.

Scientists improve model of landslide-induced tsunami
MIPT researchers Leopold Lobkovsky and Raissa Mazova, and their young colleagues from Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University have created a model of landslide-induced tsunamis that accounts for the initial location of the landslide body.

Oldest securely dated evidence for a river flowing through the Thar Desert, Western India
Using luminescence dating of ancient river sediments, a new study published in Quaternary Science Reviews presents evidence for river activity at Nal Quarry in the central Thar Desert starting from approx.

High pressure is key for better optical fibers
Signal loss along optical communication networks could be cut in half if silica glass fibers are manufactured under high pressure.

Untreated sleep apnea is associated with flu hospitalization
As we approach flu season, adults with obstructive sleep apnea may want to take extra precautions.

CVIA has just published a new issue, Volume 5 Issue 1
The journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) has just published the first issue of Volume 5.

Studying new solar tracking strategies to maximize electric production
The University of Cordoba analyzed a new strategy for solar tracking using backtracking in order to avoid shadows being cast among solar panels in photovoltaic plants

Food waste: cities can make the difference
A new study realized with the contribution of the CMCC Foundation highlights the key role of cities in tackling this phenomenon and achieving the targets of the UN 2030 Agenda.

Immune activation in the liver illuminated with new glycan-tagging strategy
A signaling system implicated in liver fibrosis and immune activation is better understood thanks to this creative chemical fishing lure.

Hand-held device reads levels of cancer biomarker
Researchers at McMaster and Brock universities have created the prototype for a hand-held device to measure a biomarker for cancer, paving the way for home-based cancer monitoring and to improve access to diagnostic testing.

Detecting early-stage failure in electric power conversion devices
Researchers from Osaka University used acoustic emission during power cycling tests to monitor in real time the complete failure process--from the earliest stages--in silicon carbide Schottsky diodes.

CNIO team finds how melanoma 'deceives' the immune system, increasing resistance to immunotherapy
* The CNIO researchers have identified how melanoma redirects the immune system, preventing it from attacking the tumour and transforming it into an ally in cancer development * A key element in this 'deception' is MIDKINE, a protein that modifies the function of several components of the immune system.

Microscopy beyond the resolution limit
The Polish-Israeli team from the Faculty of Physics of the University of Warsaw and the Weizmann Institute of Science has made another significant achievement in fluorescent microscopy.

Less invasive ventilation use grows dramatically, without needed data
Analysis of nearly 2.5 million Medicare-funded hospitalizations near the end of a patient's life found the use of non-invasive ventilation has increased substantially, even though there is little data to support its use in certain patient groups, such as those with cancer and dementia near the end of life.

New study shows how complex metabolism may have self-assembled from simple precursors
Life as we know uses energy to reproduce itself. Organisms build and break down larger molecules using a common set of reactive intermediate energy carrier molecules.

'Happy ending effect' can bias future decisions, say scientists
Our brains can't always reliably evaluate experiences that unfold over time.

Higher-calorie diets for patients with anorexia nervosa shorten hospital stays
The standard-of-care for patients with eating disorders when they are admitted to the hospital for malnutrition is to initiate a low-calorie feeding plan and bump up calories slowly.

High levels of microplastics released from infant feeding bottles during formula prep
New research shows that high levels of microplastics (MPs) are released from infant-feeding bottles (IFBs) during formula preparation.

LSU Health New Orleans review suggests HNB tobacco products may threaten health
A review of heat-not-burn (HNB) tobacco products from LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, reports an association with elevated blood pressure, increased heart rate, cell death, and circulatory dysfunction shown by early studies.

Regular social engagement linked to healthier brain microstructure in older adults
Older people who report greater levels of social engagement have more robust gray matter in regions of the brain relevant in dementia, according to new research.

Journal series gives in-depth look at COVID-19's impact on the heart
Since the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, the impact of the virus on the heart has become more prevalent, with clinicians acting in real time to effectively help heart disease patients and those at higher risk who contract coronavirus.

Democracy: Millennials are the most disillusioned generation 'in living memory' - global study
Globally, millennials are most dissatisfied with democracy, and more so than previous generations were when under 35.

Palau's coral reefs: a jewel of the ocean
The latest report from the Living Oceans Foundation finds Palau's reefs had the highest coral cover observed on the Global Reef Expedition--the largest coral reef survey and mapping expedition in history.

An integrated approach to ultrasound imaging in medicine and biology
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this editorial, Co-Editor-in-Chief, Pingtong Huang considers an integrated approach to ultrasound imaging in medicine and biology.

More than 'just a fish' story
For recreational fishing enthusiasts, the thrill of snagging their next catch comes with discovering what's hooked on the end of the line.

How a greenhouse catastrophe killed nearly all life
252 million years ago at the boundary between the Permian and Triassic epochs, Earth witnessed a mass extinction event that extinguished about three-quarters of all species on land and some 95 percent of all species in the ocean.

New evidence to guide the practice of blood transfusions in children with severe malari
Blood transfusions increase the survival of children admitted to the hospital with complications by severe malaria, and could be beneficial even at higher haemoglobin levels than those currently recommended.

Media's reporting on gun violence does not reflect reality, study finds
When looking at media reports in three cities, half of victims were covered in the news, but a disproportionate amount of attention was given to less common circumstances and victims.

Frère Jacques, are you sleeping?
Researchers at Harvard's Music Lab have determined that American infants relaxed when played lullabies that were unfamiliar and in a foreign language.

Prebiotic chemistry - In the beginning, there was sugar
Organic molecules formed the basis for the evolution of life.

Study identifies key enzyme for development of autoimmune diseases
An enzyme associated with energy production in cells also participates in the differentiation of immune cells involved in exacerbated inflammation.

Smarter models, smarter choices
Artificial intelligence isn't perfect. In fact, it's only as good as the methods and data built into it.

Global food production threatens the climate
Concentration of N2O in the atmosphere increases strongly and speeds up climate change.

The line of succession
An unusual mechanism of robustness in charge of brain mRNAs

UMD-led study shows fear and anxiety share same bases in brain
The report by an international team of researchers led by Alexander Shackman, an associate professor of psychology at UMD, and Juyoen Hur, an assistant professor of psychology at Yonsei University in Seoul, South Korea, provides new evidence that fear and anxiety reflect overlapping brain circuits.

UCI-led study reveals restoration of retinal and visual function following gene therapy
A breakthrough study, led by researchers from the University of California, Irvine, results in the restoration of retinal and visual functions of mice models suffering from inherited retinal disease.

Tiny beetles a bellwether of ecological disruption by climate change
New research shows that as species across the world adjust where they live in response to climate change, they will come into competition with other species that could hamper their ability to keep up with the pace of this change.

CRISPR meets Pac-Man: New DNA cut-and-paste tool enables bigger gene edits
Gene editing for the development of new treatments, and for studying disease as well as normal function in humans and other organisms, may advance more quickly with a new tool for cutting larger pieces of DNA out of a cell's genome, according to a new study by UC San Francisco scientists.

Cheaters don't always win: species that work together do better
The sign of a healthy personal relationship is one that is equally mutual - where you get out just as much as you put in.
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