Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 21, 2020
Bronze Age herders were less mobile than previously thought
Bronze Age pastoralists in what is now southern Russia apparently covered shorter distances than previously thought.

Dual brain imaging provides insight into neural basis of patient-clinician relationship
Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital have reported on an experiment using a novel magnetic resonance imaging-based approach to track the effects of different behaviors on the brain while patients and clinicians interact with one another.

New research reveals why low oxygen damages the brain
Brain cell dysfunction in low oxygen is, surprisingly, caused by the very same responder system that is intended to be protective, according to a new published study by a team of researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

New national poll: young Americans favor reforms
The time has come for reform on how the United States deals with the electoral process, the environment and social justice, according to a new national poll released today by the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion that takes an in-depth look at the views of Americans age 18 to 39.

Palliative care needed across China for everyone who needs it -- study
Palliative care should extend across China and pay more attention to managing non-malignant disease -- integrated within the country's healthcare system and available to everyone who needs it, according to a new study.

In pursuit of alternative pesticides
Controlling crop pests is a key element of agriculture worldwide, but the environmental impact of insecticides is a growing concern.

Perspective: Understanding COVID-19 vaccine efficacy
In this Perspective, Marc Lipsitch and Natalie Dean consider what would happen if a COVID-19 vaccine offers little to no protection in high-risk groups, like the elderly and those with comorbidities, yet is able to reduce infection or infectiousness in younger adults.

Collaborative care to meet mental health demands in era of COVID-19
The need for collaborative care among health care professionals to meet mental health demands in the COVID-19 pandemic is discussed in this Viewpoint.

This beetle can survive getting run over by a car. Engineers are figuring out how.
Getting run over by a car is not a near-death experience for the diabolical ironclad beetle.

Spectral CT improves detection of early-stage coronavirus disease (COVID-19)
According to an open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), the use of spectral CT with electron density imaging could improve the assessment of lung lesion extent in patients with early-stage coronavirus disease (COVID-19).

Characteristics associated with racial/ethnic disparities in COVID-19 outcomes
Researchers examined the sociodemographic characteristics of patients associated with racial/ethnic differences in COVID-19 outcomes.

Genomic differences may be key to overcoming prostate cancer disparities
In a new article published in Clinical Cancer Research, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers describes the immune-oncologic differences in prostate cancer tumors of African American men and how those variations may be exploited to develop more personalized treatment approaches for this population.

Player behavior in the online game EVE Online may reflect real world country
Virtual worlds may reflect social and economic behavior in the real world, according to a study published October 21, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andres M.

Oncotarget: quantitative ultrasound radiomics in prediction of treatment response for breast cancer
The cover for Issue 42 of Oncotarget features Figure 4, ''Generation of parametric and texture maps from radiofrequency data,'' recently published in ''Quantitative ultrasound radiomics using texture derivatives in prediction of treatment response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer'' by Dasgupta, et al. which reported that to investigate quantitative ultrasound based higher-order texture derivatives in predicting the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer.

The new heavy isotope mendelevium-244 and a puzzling short-lived fission activity
A team of scientists from GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, University Mainz (JGU), Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) and the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland, has provided new insights into the fission processes in exotic nuclei and for this, has produced the hitherto unknown nucleus mendelevium-244.

The soft power concept of German energy foreign policy
As part of its foreign policy, Germany hopes to promote energy transitions abroad through international partnerships.

Deep magma facilitates the movement of tectonic plates
A small amount of molten rock located under tectonic plates encourages them to move.

Scientists develop algorithm to help relieve pressure on the NHS
New research suggests an algorithm could be used to help optimise the sharing of healthcare resources during the Covid-19 pandemic, preventing NHS intensive care units (ICU) from becoming overwhelmed.

User-friendly cucurbit downy mildew diagnosis guide suited for both experts and beginners
As the disease is rapid, infectious, and hard-to-diagnose, a team of plant pathologists with North Carolina State University and Michigan State University put together a clear and summarized guide to cucurbit downy mildew for beginners and experts.

Princeton and Mpala scholars link obesity and disease to dramatic dietary changes
The ''mismatch hypothesis'' argues that our bodies evolved to digest the foods that our ancestors ate, and that human bodies will struggle and largely fail to metabolize a radically new set of foods.

Opioid use disorder? Electronic health records help pinpoint probable patients
A new study suggests that patients with opioid use disorder may be identified using information available in electronic health records, even when diagnostic codes do not reflect this diagnosis.

Simple software creates complex wooden joints
Wood is considered an attractive construction material for both aesthetic and environmental purposes.

Pastoral care shown to support older people at risk from COVID-19
Volunteers from the Catholic Church in Brazil helped to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 among the elderly, a new study shows.

Aging alone does not explain kidney pathology
Histopathology in non-neoplastic kidney tissue from 1,347 nephrectomy specimens showed very limited histopathologic changes in subset of older individuals.

Genome archeologists discover path to activate immune response against cancer
Ancient embedded elements in our DNA from generations past can activate a powerful immune response to kill cancer cells like an infection.

Existing heart drugs may help cancer patients respond better to PD(L)1 immunotherapy
Researchers have found that a class of commonly-used heart drugs may also improve patients' responses to anti-cancer immunotherapies called PD(L)1 inhibitors, according to preliminary findings to be presented at the 32th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, which is taking place online.

Do black lives matter protests impact fatal police interactions and crime?
A new analysis of nine years of nationwide data examines the impacts of the Black Lives Matter movement on fatal interactions with police, and on crime and arrests.

One mouse at a time: new approach to testing potential drugs for children's cancers
Researchers have developed a way of testing potential drugs for children's cancers so as to take account of the wide genetic diversity of these diseases. instead of conventional testing designs, which use multiple mice as models for rare children's cancers, analysis had revealed that it was possible to evaluate them on a single mouse, which could accelerate the development of better treatments.

Women with cervical cancer may have increased risk of injury during diagnostic workup
Among women participating in cervical cancer screening in Sweden, those with a diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer had an increased risk of iatrogenic injuries (as a consequence of medical intervention) and non-iatrogenic injuries (caused by accidents and self-harm) requiring hospitalization.

Serum creatinine-to- cystatin C ratio predicts mortality
In patients initiating continuous renal replacement therapy for acute kidney injury, higher serum creatinine-to-cystatin C ratios were associated with lower mortality.

AI and photonics join forces to make it easier to find 'new Earths'
By combining photonics with artificial intelligence, University of Sydney scientists have developed a sensor that will help decipher the 'twinkle' of stars and allow for Earth-based exploration of planets around distant stars.

OPD optical sensors that reproduce any color
POSTECH Professor Dae Sung Chung's team uses chemical doping to freely control the colors of organic photodiodes.

Community noise may affect dementia risk
Results from a new study published in Alzheimer's & Dementia support emerging evidence suggesting that noise may influence individuals' risk of developing dementia later in life.

UCI materials scientists discover design secrets of nearly indestructible insect
Materials science researchers at the University of California, Irvine conducted a nanoscopic examination of the diabolical ironclad beetle, a species native to the Southwestern US, to learn what makes it so tough and crush resistant.

Tryptophan's role in celiac pathway in mice points to treatment strategies
New studies in mice show how an inability to metabolize tryptophan may be related to celiac disease, according to Bruno Lamas and colleagues.

It's all about the right balance
Collaborative work of research groups at the University of Würzburg and the TU Dresden has provided important new insights for cancer research.

Scientists take major step toward Angelman Syndrome gene therapy
Babies born with a faulty maternal copy of the UBE3A gene will develop Angelman syndrome, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with no cure and limited treatments.

Gut bacteria linked to weight gain following chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer
A new study suggests that gut bacteria are partially responsible for metabolic changes that lead to weight gain following chemotherapy treatment.

A new way of looking at the Earth's interior
Current understanding is that the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle is relatively homogeneous.

Millions, in record numbers, seek police reforms
A new study published in Journal of Medical Internet Research, the leading publisher in biomedical informatics, finds that record numbers of Americans seek police reforms by examining internet searches.

Building blocks of language evolved 30-40 million years ago
The capacity for language is built upon our ability to understand combinations of words and the relationships between them, but the evolutionary history of this ability is little understood.

Ice loss likely to continue in Antarctica
A new international study led by Monash University climate scientists has revealed that ice loss in Antarctica persisted for many centuries after it was initiated and is expected to continue.

Delivering proteins to testes could someday treat male infertility
According to the Mayo Clinic, about 15% of couples are infertile, and male infertility plays a role in over one-third of these cases.

Scientists identify compound that stimulates muscle cells in mice
UCLA researchers have identified a compound that can reproduce the effect of exercise in muscle cells in mice.

Mass screening method could slash COVID-19 testing costs, trial finds
Using a new mathematical approach to screen large groups for COVID-19 could be around 20 times cheaper than individual testing, a study suggests.

Americans' responses to COVID-19 stay-home orders differed according to population density
Americans strongly reduced their visits to grocery stores, pharmacies, and transit stations following stay-at-home orders from mayors and governors earlier this year, but did not reduce their visits to parks and beaches.

Seeing no longer believing: the manipulation of online images
A peace sign from Martin Luther King, Jr, becomes a rude gesture; dolphins in Venice's Grand Canal - manipulated or mis-used images posted as truth.

A flexible color-changing film inspired by chameleon skin (video)
Chameleons can famously change their colors to camouflage themselves, communicate and regulate their temperature.

ALMA shows volcanic impact on Io's atmosphere
New radio images from ALMA show for the first time the direct effect of volcanic activity on the atmosphere of Jupiter's moon Io.

Management of exploited transboundary fish stocks requires international cooperation
Marine fish species are migratory in nature and not respectful of human-made territorial boundaries, which represents a challenge for fisheries management as policies tend to focus at the national level.

Genome sequencing shows climate barrier to spread of Africanized bees
Since the 1950s, ''Africanized'' honeybees have spread north and south across the Americas until apparently coming to a halt in California and northern Argentina.

Good vibrations for new energy
Imagine a mobile phone charger that doesn't need a wireless or mains power source.

3D hand pose estimation using a wrist-worn camera
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology working in collaboration with colleagues at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of St Andrews and the University of New South Wales have developed a wrist-worn device for 3D hand pose estimation.

Tracking the SARS-CoV-2 virus with genome sequencing
Dirk Dittmer, PhD, professor of microbiology and immunology at the UNC School of Medicine, is tracking the virus that causes COVID-19 by sequencing the genome of virus samples collected from diagnostic testing.

Tumor DNA in spinal fluid could help doctors better monitor childhood brain cancer
Researchers have demonstrated that a new liquid biopsy approach overcomes traditional barriers to quickly and efficiently diagnose and monitor high-grade pediatric gliomas.

Observed COVID-19 variability may have underlying molecular sources
People have different susceptibilities to SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind the COVID-19 pandemic, and develop varying degrees of fever, fatigue, and breathing problems -- common symptoms of the illness.

Oncotarget: Sirolimus-eluting stents -- opposite in vitro effects on the clonogenic cell potential
The cover for issue 31 of Oncotarget features Figure 4, ''Concentration dose-response curves of sirolimus effect [55 nM-1 nM] on the number of cells per surviving colony in U2OS cell line after 2 weeks exposure,'' by Vasuri, et al. which reported that the authors evaluated the long-term effects of sirolimus on three different cell in vitro models, cultured in physiological conditions mimicking sirolimus-eluted stent, in order to clarify the effectiveness of sirolimus in blocking cell proliferation and survival.

Brigham researchers make strides in detecting preeclampsia risk
To improve early detection of preeclampsia risks and better classify potential subtypes of the disease, a team led by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital analyzed an array of maternal and placental proteins, identifying several biomarkers that, from a blood sample drawn at 12 weeks gestation, can help predict the risk of preeclampsia and, equally importantly, can assess who may develop more severe forms of the condition.

Vanilla cultivation under trees promotes pest regulation
The cultivation of vanilla in Madagascar provides a good income for small-holder farmers, but without trees and bushes the plantations can lack biodiversity.

Scientists use gene therapy and a novel light-sensing protein to restore vision in mice
A newly developed light-sensing protein called the MCO1 opsin restores vision in blind mice when attached to retina bipolar cells using gene therapy.

Researchers provide most detailed and complete record yet of Earth's last magnetic reversal
Earth's magnetic fields typically switch every 200 to 300 millennia.

Gut hormone blocks brain cell formation and is linked to Parkinson's dementia
A gut hormone, ghrelin, is a key regulator of new nerve cells in the adult brain, a Swansea-led research team has discovered.

Five key factors for improving team learning in distance education
Distance studying and working is on the rise and, especially now with the constant threat of lockdown, learning how to master it more pressing than ever.

Nonverbal doctor-patient rapport relieved pain during acupuncture treatment
When 22 acupuncture clinicians and 23 patients seeking pain relief mirrored each other's facial expressions during acupuncture treatment, patients experienced less pain, according to a new study.

Researchers analyze studies of interventions to prevent violence against children
Numerous studies have examined interventions aimed at preventing violence against children.

Tocilizumab doesn't ease symptoms or prevent death in moderately ill COVID-19 inpatients
The drug tocilizumab (Actemra) does not reduce the need for breathing assistance with mechanical ventilation or prevent death in moderately ill hospitalized patients with COVID-19, according to a study by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Cholesterol medications linked to lower cancer-related deaths in women
Among women with breast cancer, colorectal cancer, or melanoma, those who were taking cholesterol-lowering medications, were less likely to die from cancer, according to an analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

Innovation spins spider web architecture into 3D imaging technology
Purdue University innovators are taking cues from nature to develop 3D photodetectors for biomedical imaging.

Study finds go-to hormone for cycad propagation ineffective
Newly published thesis research by a University of Guam master's graduate reveals that propagation of cycads through stem cuttings does not benefit from a commonly used rooting hormone.

Legacy pollutants found in migratory terns in Great Lakes region
Chemicals that haven't been manufactured in the U.S. for years or even decades are still turning up in the bodies of migratory terns in the Great Lakes region, a new study finds.

Cognitive elements of language have existed for 40 million years
Humans are not the only beings that can identify rules in complex language-like constructions -- monkeys and great apes can do so, too, a study at the University of Zurich has shown.

Chili-shaped device could reveal just how hot that pepper is
Some people love spicy food -- the hotter, the better.

Transcription factors may inadvertently lock in DNA mistakes
A team of Duke researchers has found that transcription factors have a tendency to bind strongly to ''mismatched'' sections of DNA, i.e. sections of the genome that were not copied correctly.

The highest heat-resistant plastic ever is developed from biomass
The use of biomass-derived plastics is one of the prime concerns to establish a sustainable society, which is incorporated as one of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Protected areas help waterbirds adapt to climate change
Climate change pushes species distribution areas northward. However, the expansion of species ranges is not self-evident due to e.g. habitat degradation and unsustainable harvesting caused by human activities.

MSK-led studies support the concept of 'cancer environment immunotherapy'
Two MSK-led studies published in the journal Nature support the idea of using immunotherapy drugs to treat the environment surrounding a tumor as an indirect way to combat cancer.

The First Book of Breathing: A new assessment based on an edition of papyrus FMNH 31324
Assessment of a Papyrus in the Field Museum has led to a new analysis of the First Book of Breathing, an ancient Egyptian funerary text intended to enable deceased people to join the gods in the afterlife.

Why can our brains learn and memorize?
The long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) of hippocampal excitatory synapse involved in learning and memory formation in brain have been separately explained, but the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated.

Does classroom indoor environmental quality affect teaching and learning?
What impact does a classroom's indoor environment have on teaching, learning, and students' academic achievement in colleges and universities?

Smile, wave: Some exoplanets may be able to see us, too
Three decades after Cornell astronomer Carl Sagan suggested that Voyager 1 snap Earth's picture from billions of miles away - resulting in the iconic Pale Blue Dot photograph - two astronomers now offer another unique cosmic perspective: Some exoplanets - planets from beyond our own solar system - have a direct line of sight to observe Earth's biological qualities from far, far away.

Critically ill infants given blood transfusions before surgery have poorer outcomes
Critically ill newborns who receive blood transfusions prior to surgery had about a 50% increased rate of complications or death than those who did not receive transfusions, according to a new study published today in Pediatrics by Nemours Children's Health System researchers.

Paper: Congress must clarify limits of gene-editing technologies
How the next Congress decides to handle the issue editing human sperm and eggs will affect the science, ethics and financing of genomic editing for decades to come, said Jacob S.

The effects of wildfires and spruce beetle outbreaks on forest temperatures
Results from a study published in the Journal of Biogeography indicate that wildfires may play a role in accelerating climate-driven species changes in mountain forests by compounding regional warming trends.

Turbulent era sparked leap in human behavior, adaptability 320,000 years ago
The first analysis of a sedimentary drill core representing 1 million years of environmental history in the East African Rift Valley shows that at the same time early humans were abandoning old tools in favor of more sophisticated technology and broadening their trade, their landscape was experiencing frequent fluctuations in vegetation and water supply that made resources less reliably available.

How fear encourages physical distancing during pandemic
Despite guidelines plastered on the walls and floors of grocery and retail stores encouraging customers to maintain six-feet of physical distance during the pandemic, many do not.

ASTRO issues clinical guideline on radiation therapy for rectal cancer
A new clinical guideline from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) provides guidance for physicians who use radiation therapy to treat patients with locally advanced rectal cancer.

Thermal vision of snakes inspires soft pyroelectric materials
Converting heat into electricity is a property thought to be reserved only for stiff materials like crystals.

This white paint keeps surfaces cooler than surroundings, even under direct sunlight
Scientists have developed a white paint that cools below the temperature of its ambient surroundings even under direct sunlight.

Diagnosing Parkinson's disease with skin samples could lead to earlier detection
New research shows a simple skin test can accurately identify Parkinson's disease, which could lead to earlier detection of the disease and better outcomes for patients.

More turkey dinners for people with celiac disease?
An international team of researchers led by McMaster University has found that tryptophan, an amino acid present in high amounts in turkey, along with some probiotics, may help them heal and respond better to a gluten-free diet

NOAA report reveals condition of natural and cultural resources of Papahānaumokuākea
NOAA published a peer-reviewed State of the Monument report jointly produced by the co-trustees of Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

Researchers identify genetic variants linked to toxic side effects from bevacizumab
In the largest study of its kind, researchers have found two common genetic variants that can be used to predict whether or not cancer patients might suffer severe adverse side-effects, such as high blood pressure, from the drug bevacizumab.

Animal-based research: New experimental design for an improved reproducibility
In research, the results of studies must be precise and reproducible.

Cutting cancer off at the head
Using a 2 ml blood sample from 100 gastric cancer patients, researchers succeeded in identifying cancer cells circulating in the bloodstream and trace them back to their origin tumor by detecting an overexpression of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR2) in both the cancer cells and the tumor.

Word graph analysis confirms that dream report structure varies according to sleep stage
Study by Brazilian and South African researchers is the first to prove, using a graph analysis tool, that REM dream narratives tend to be more complex and connected than reports of non-REM dreams.

Highly effective tumor detection strategy for common childhood brain tumors
A team of scientists at Texas A&M University, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital have developed a way to more accurately both detect and monitor a common type of pediatric brain cancer, setting the stage for giving clinicians a real-time view into how the cancer responds to treatment.

Ketamine, a painkiller used by the army, does not impair tolerance to blood loss
A low dose of ketamine, administered intravenously, does not alter a healthy human's tolerance to blood loss.

Reduced hormone supply in pregnant mothers linked to ADHD in their children
Low levels of key, body-regulating chemicals in mothers during the first three months of pregnancy may interfere with the baby's brain development, a large American study shows.

Virtual Reality health appointments can help patients address eating disorders
Research from the University of Kent, the Research centre on Interactive Media, Smart systems and Emerging technologies -- RISE Ltd and the University of Cyprus has revealed that Virtual Reality (VR) technology can have significant impact on the validity of remote health appointments for those with eating disorders, through a process called Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy (VRET).

Hospitals leaned toward strict COVID-19 NICU policies despite low prevalence of infection
Two studies examining the impact of COVID-19 on neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) found the prevalence of COVID-19 in NICU infants is low, yet many hospitals at the start of the pandemic put in place strict parental visitation policies and scaled back NICU services such as lactation support and therapy.

Cognitive performance - Better than our predecessors
We employ our cognitive skills daily to assimilate and process information.

TU Graz researchers discover new sediment archive for historical climate research
Geological investigations of low-temperature young deposits on the Styrian Erzberg provide paleoclimatology with new data on the earth's history and its development.

Hidden states of the COVID-19 spike protein
Computer modeling of the COVID-19 virus on supercomputers showed that the spike protein visits an intermediate state before it can dock to the receptor protein on the host cell membrane.

Oxygen can do a favor to synthesize metal-organic frameworks
IBS scienetists have identified how oxygen affects the synthesis of a novel metal-organic framework.

Updated CPR guidelines tackle health disparities management of opioid-related emergencies and physical, emotional recovery
Updated CPR guidelines address health disparities and the management of opioid-related emergencies as well; early bystander and AED intervention remains key to survival.

Cancer-linked enzyme mechanism newly characterized in study
A new study is the first to describe a biochemical mechanism that influences activity in a protein linked to cancer, aging, inflammatory responses and addiction-related behaviors.

Study discovers potential target for treating aggressive cancer cells
New research by a team at Brown University finds that special filaments called vimentin may be key to the spread of some aggressive, chemo-resistant cancer cells.

At our cores, we're all strengthened by 'dumbbells'
Scientists at Rice's Center for Theoretical Biological Physics detail the structure of dumbbell-like sequences in DNA during interphase that suggest several unseen aspects of chromosome configuration and function.

Mayo Clinic: diagnostic, therapeutic advance for rare neurodegenerative disorder
Mayo Clinic researchers, along with national and global collaborators, have developed a potential test for Machado-Joseph disease, or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) ? a disease that has no cure.

Covid-19 interventions can cut virus infections, severe outcomes, and healthcare needs
Non-pharmaceutical interventions such as voluntary shelter-in-place, quarantines, and other steps taken to control the SARS-CoV-2 virus can reduce the peak number of infections, daily infection rates, cumulative infections, and overall deaths, a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE has found.

Social isolation exacerbates the situation of school bullying victims
A study from the University of Cordoba (Spain) analyzed degrees of acceptance, popularity and friendship at different stages of victimization in the field of school bullying

Journal calls for use of objective data in root cause analyses of adverse medical events
Quality Management in Healthcare calls for reliance on objective data to introduce new insights on why adverse sentinel events such as medication errors keep occurring.

New drug that can prevent the drug resistance and adverse effects
A research team in Korea is garnering attention for having developed an anticancer drug that could potentially prevent drug resistance.

MonoEye: A human motion capture system using a single wearable camera
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Carnegie Mellon University have together developed a new human motion capture system that consists of a single ultra-wide fisheye camera mounted on the user's chest.

Study reveals disparities in access to high-quality surgical care
Among U.S. patients diagnosed with breast, prostate, lung, or colorectal cancer from 2004 to 2016, those who were uninsured or had Medicare or Medicaid were less likely than privately insured patients to receive surgical care at high-volume hospitals.

How do snakes 'see' in the dark? Researchers have an answer
Certain species of snake -- think pit vipers, boa constrictors and pythons, among others -- are able to find and capture prey with uncanny accuracy, even in total darkness.

Covid-19 vaccine trials cannot tell us if they will save lives
Vaccines are being hailed as the solution to the covid-19 pandemic, but the vaccine trials currently underway are not designed to tell us if they will save lives, reports Peter Doshi, Associate Editor at The BMJ today.

Novel method for measuring spatial dependencies turns less data into more data
Researcher makes 'little data' act big through, the application of mathematical techniques normally used for time-series, to spatial processes.

Keck Medicine of USC enrolling individuals in phase 3 clinical trial to treat mild Alzheimer's disease using deep brain stimulation
Keck Medicine of USC is enrolling individuals in an international phase 3 clinical trial to examine the safety and effectiveness of deep brain stimulation to treat Alzheimer's.

Vitamin A boosts fat burning in cold conditions
A recent study conducted by a research team led by Florian Kiefer from MedUni Vienna's Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism shows that cold ambient temperatures increase vitamin A levels in humans and mice.

High flavanol diet may lead to lower blood pressure
People who consume a diet including flavanol-rich foods and drinks, including tea, apples and berries, could lead to lower blood pressure, according to the first study using objective measures of thousands of UK residents' diet.

COVID-19 patients with spinal fractures are twice as likely to die
Patients with COVID-19 and vertebral fractures are twice as likely to die from the disease, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

U of M trial shows hydroxychloroquine does not prevent COVID-19 in health care workers
University of Minnesota Medical School researchers found that taking hydroxychloroquine once or twice weekly did not prevent the development of COVID-19 in health care workers better than the placebo.
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