Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 22, 2020
DrugCell: New experimental AI platform matches tumor to best drug combo
UC San Diego researchers use experimental artificial intelligence system called DrugCell to predict the best approach to treating cancer.

Simple actions can help people survive landslides
Simple actions can dramatically improve a person's chances of surviving a landslide, according to records from 38 landslides in the US and around the world.

Questionnaire-based tool measures fatigue in patients receiving dialysis
A new patient-reported outcome measure assesses fatigue in patients receiving dialysis.

MRI safely performed in patients with pacemakers and ICDs
MRI examinations can be performed safely in patients with non-MR compatible cardiac devices, including those who are pacemaker-dependent or have abandoned leads, according to a new study.

Discoveries reshape understanding of gut microbiome
The findings redefine how the so-called gut microbiome operates and how our bodies coexist with some of the 100 trillion bacteria that make it up.

Tel Aviv University researchers discover molecular link between diet and risk of cancer
An international team of researchers has identified a direct molecular link between meat and dairy diets and the development of antibodies in the blood that increase the chances of developing cancer.

Toward a new staging system for prostate cancer, and why it matters
The development and validation of a staging system for non-metastatic prostate cancer could help doctors and patients assess treatment options, as well as improve clinical trials.

Artificial intelligence can now predict students' educational outcomes based on tweets
The new model, created by computational social scientist Ivan Smirnov of HSE University, predicts the academic success of Russian high school students with an accuracy of 94%.

Glomerular diseases linked to higher risk of cardiovascular conditions
Adults with glomerular diseases have a 2.5-times higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease than individuals in the general population.

A new technique predicts how earthquakes would affect a city's hospitals
An international research team led by the Stanford Blume Center for Earthquake Engineering has developed a methodology to help disaster preparedness officials in large cities make contingency plans on a region-wide basis to make sure that emergency responders can get patients to the hospital facilities that are likeliest to remain in commission after a quake.

Turning streetwear into solar power plants
Researchers at Empa and ETH Zurich succeeded in developing a material that works like a luminescent solar concentrator and can even be applied to textiles.

Report calls for easing access, improving home health for older adults
Older adults have suffered disproportionately from the COVID-19 pandemic, with increased risk of severe illness and death reported across the globe.

Technology shines the light on ovarian cancer treatments
A Purdue University scientist and entrepreneur is working to use simple LED light to help determine if certain chemotherapy options will work for specific patients.

Global MRI data offers hope for improving treatment of brain injuries
A sizable research consortium coordinated by NTNU and St. Olavs Hospital will analyse large amounts of MRI exam data from around the world.

How'd we get so picky about friendship late in life? Ask the chimps
When humans age, they tend to favor small circles of meaningful, already established friendships rather than seek new ones.

Collaboration sparks new model for ceramic conductivity
As insulators, metal oxides - also known as ceramics - may not seem like obvious candidates for electrical conductivity.

Enzyme biofactories to enhance cord blood transplants
Stem cell trafficking to the bone marrow is improved by enzyme manufactured in silkworms and yeast.

A wearable sensor to help ALS patients communicate
MIT researchers have designed a skin-like device that can be attached to the face and measure small movements such as a twitch or a smile.

Like humans, aging wild chimpanzees value their more "positive" friendships most
Like humans, wild chimpanzees focus on fewer yet more meaningful friendships as they grow older, say researchers who studied male chimps over two decades.

Antiretroviral therapy can't completely stop accelerated cell aging seen in HIV
Untreated HIV infection is linked with epigenetic changes that suggest rapid aging.

Closing the plastic loop
Researchers develop a one-pot, low temperature catalytic method to turn polyethylene polymers into alkylaromatic molecules.

Common treatment for diabetic macular edema not effective in Black individuals
A medication frequently used to treat diabetic macular edema, which is the most common cause of blindness in people with diabetes, is less effective when used to treat the condition in Black patients, new study results show.

How genetic variation gives rise to differences in mathematical ability
DNA variation in a gene called ROBO1 is associated with early anatomical differences in a brain region that plays a key role in quantity representation, potentially explaining how genetic variability might shape mathematical performance in children, according to a study published October 22nd in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Michael Skeide of the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, and colleagues.

Tracer molecule may improve imaging tests for brain injury
Researchers have validated a new radiolabeled molecule that can be used with imaging tests to accurately detect and characterize brain injury.

New tricks for old antibiotics
The study published in the journal Immunity reveals that tetracyclines (broad spectre antibiotics), by partially inhibiting cell mitochondria activity, induce a compensatory response on the organism that decreases tissue damage caused during infection.

Media alert--forthcoming reviews from RAPID REVIEWS:COVID-19
Media Alert--MIT Press journal Rapid Reviews: COVID-19 will review preprints on evidence that racial/ethnic disparities are bigger than previously reported, the prevalence of antibodies in healthcare workers, and the effectiveness of 10-day quarantines

New blood cancer treatment works by selectively interfering with cancer cell signalling
University of Alberta scientists have identified the mechanism of action behind a new type of precision cancer drug for blood cancers that is set for human trials, according to research published in Nature Communications.

Rural-urban differences in health care use, survival among individuals with Alzheimer disease, related dementia
Researchers investigated differences in health care use and survival between Medicare patients with Alzheimer disease and related dementia living in rural compared with urban areas.

Soil fungi act like a support network for trees, study shows
University of Alberta research is first to show that growth rate of adult trees is linked to fungal networks colonizing their roots.

Why do white Americans support both strict immigration policies and dream act?
White Americans support strict immigration policies while at the same time favor the DREAM Act that would grant legal status to some immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, a contradiction linked to racial resentment and the belief that equality already exists, according to a Rutgers-led study.

Birthrates, marriage will change dramatically in post-pandemic world, say scientists
COVID-19 and America's response to it will profoundly affect our families, work lives, relationships and gender roles for years, say prominent scientists and authors who analyzed 90 research studies and used their expertise to predict its aftermath.

Samara Polytech chemists designed portable analyzers
Employees of the laboratory 'Multivariate Analysis and Global Modelling' of Samara Polytech design portable analyzers for a wide range of practical applications that can quickly and accurately determine the content of the examined component.

Exercising one arm has twice the benefits
New research from Edith Cowan University (ECU) has revealed that training one arm can improve strength and decrease muscle loss in the other arm - without even moving it.

Ancient Maya built sophisticated water filters
Ancient Maya in the once-bustling city of Tikal built sophisticated water filters using natural materials they imported from miles away, according to the University of Cincinnati.

Troubled independent oncology practices in COVID-19 era
The financial risks and challenges for independent oncology practices in the COVID-19 era and possible solutions to promote their stability and survival are discussed in this Viewpoint.

Paediatrics: Antiepileptic drug exposure in pregnancy and neurodevelopmental disorder risk
Children born to mothers who took the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate during pregnancy may have a four to five-fold increased risk of developing neurodevelopmental disorders in early childhood, according to a study in Scientific Reports.

Why is fertilizer used in explosives? (video)
Over the last century, the compound ammonium nitrate has been involved in at least 30 disasters and terrorist attacks.

A sustainable future requires holistic actions towards ambitious biodiversity goals
A 'safety net' made up of multiple, interlinked and ambitious goals is needed to tackle nature's alarming decline.

Type 1 diabetes: Tannic acid encapsulation protects transplanted islets from rejection
One therapy for Type 1 diabetes is promising -- transplanting pancreatic islets from cadavers -- but a need for immunosuppression and a reactivated autoimmunity lead to low graft viability and function after five years.

How does the immune system develop in the first days of life?
Researchers highlight the anti-inflammatory response taking place after birth and designed to shield the newborn from infection.

Comparing canine brains using 3D-endocast modelling
Based on digital endocranial cast models the canine brain does not increase proportionally with body size.

Why cats have 9 lives - high-quality cat genome helps identify novel cause of dwarfism
A new and improved cat genome developed by the feline research teams at the University of Missouri and Texas A&M University has already proven to be a valuable tool for feline biomedical research by helping to confirm existing gene variants and new candidate genes underlying diseases in cats.

Cicada-inspired waterproof surfaces closer to reality, researchers report
A multidisciplinary group that studies the physical and chemical properties of insect wings has demonstrated the ability to reproduce the nanostructures that help cicada wings repel water and prevent bacteria from establishing on the surface.

Hackensack Meridian CDI, University of Michigan show faster COVID-19 antibody test
A new portable ''lab on a chip,'' developed by the U-M scientists and demonstrated with help of the CDI, can identify the presence of COVID-19 antibodies in blood donors with greater speed and efficiency than the current standard

Scientist develops new way to test for COVID-19 antibodies
New research details how a cell-free test rapidly detects COVID-19 neutralizing antibodies and could aid in vaccine testing and drug discovery efforts.

To avoid impression that SARS-CoV-2 transmission is ever-changing, interpret new info using existing
The global spread of SARS-CoV-2 has taken a variety of forms, ranging from localized and quickly controlled outbreaks to large, ongoing epidemics with deadly consequences.

These two bird-sized dinosaurs evolved the ability to glide, but weren't great at it
Despite having bat-like wings, two small dinosaurs, Yi and Ambopteryx, struggled to fly, only managing to glide clumsily between the trees where they lived, researchers report October 22 in the journal iScience.

Reviewing multiferroics for future, low-energy data storage
Big data and exponential demands for computations are driving an unsustainable rise in global ICT energy use.

African crocodiles lived in Spain six million years ago
The crocodiles that inhabited the coasts of North Africa during the late Miocene period embarked on a journey to Europe across what is now the Mediterranean basin.

How herpes infection may impair human fetal brain development
Three cell-based models shed light on how herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, which can spread to the fetal brain during pregnancy, may contribute to various neurodevelopmental disabilities and long-term neurological problems into adulthood, according to a study published October 22, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Pu Chen and Ying Wu of Wuhan University, and colleagues.

Preventive drugs halve malaria cases in African schoolchildren
Giving preventive drugs to school-age children in Africa substantially reduces malaria infections and cases of anaemia, according to a new study in The Lancet Global Health.

Cord blood DNA can hold clues for early ASD diagnosis and intervention
Specific regions in cord blood DNA can help identify kids who might develop autism, according to a UC Davis MIND Institute study.

Researchers discover 'spooky' similarity in how brains and computers see
The brain detects 3D shape fragments (bumps, hollows, shafts, spheres) in the beginning stages of object vision - a newly discovered strategy of natural intelligence that Johns Hopkins University researchers also found in artificial intelligence networks trained to recognize visual objects.

Robotic trunk support trainer improves upper body control of children with cerebral palsy
Columbia Engineering researchers report their innovative robotic Trunk Support Trainer, when combined with active practice of postural movements, improves trunk and reaching control in CP children with impaired sitting control.

Axing the ACA means young adults with cancer lose coverage
A new study led by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has quantified the impact of repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) for 18 to 25-year-old cancer patients, who are covered by their parents' health insurance.

Individuals may legitimize hacking when angry with system or authority
University of Kent research has found that when individuals feel that a system or authority is unresponsive to their demands, they are more likely to legitimise hacker activity at an organisation's expense.

Vaccine to treat and prevent lung, bowel and pancreatic cancer shows promise in the lab
An experimental vaccine, designed to enlist the body's own immune system to target cancer cells, has shown promise for treating and preventing cancer in mice.

Nobel Prize winner says scientific research has to be 'passion-driven'
Scientists cannot be expected to drop everything they're working on to turn their attention to beating COVID-19, according to the winner of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, Professor Sir Peter Ratcliffe.

Big-hearted corvids
Taking a look at generosity within the crow family reveals parallels with human evolution.

Do the twist: Making two-dimensional quantum materials using curved surfaces
Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have discovered a way to control the growth of twisting, microscopic spirals of materials just one atom thick.

Medical minds meet to develop novel treatment for one patient's immune system defect
A young woman who had been hospitalized for three months straight due to debilitating, recurrent infections with no apparent underlying cause was finally able to go home thanks to a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) team who put their heads together, discovered a root of the problem, and developed a novel treatment strategy just for her.

COVID-19 anxiety linked to body image issues
A new study has found that anxiety and stress directly linked to COVID-19 could be causing a number of body image issues.

A promising discovery could lead to better treatment for Hepatitis C
Virologists at Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) have identified a critical role played by a cellular protein in the progression of Hepatitis C virus infection, paving the way for more effective treatment.

New study: aspirin use reduces risk of death in hospitalized patients
Hospitalized COVID-19 patients who were taking a daily low-dose aspirin to protect against cardiovascular disease had a significantly lower risk of complications and death compared to those who were not taking aspirin, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM).

Are bushmeat hunters aware of zoonotic disease? Yes, but that's not the issue
A recent paper published in the journal PLOS ONE, outlines how researchers with the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine and Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, measured the attitudes, practices and zoonoses awareness among community members associated with the bushmeat trade in northern Uganda.

Findings shed light on the ancient origins of speed control during movement
Movement in animals is complex. Little has been known about how spinal inhibitory interneurons work to silence other neurons and related muscle groups in coordination with the active muscle groups across changing speeds.

Gender insecurity prompts women MMA fighters to date hypermasculine men
Women who compete in martial arts and combat sports challenge gender norms in their profession but often embrace them wholeheartedly and even overdo them in their personal lives, finds a UC Riverside study published in Sociology of Sport Journal. The findings underscore the need for caution when assigning a feminist label to an organization or activity simply because it features women in powerful positions.

CCS can rapidly reduce emissions in sectors that have few other options to decarbonize, EFI/Stanford
The Energy Futures Initiative (EFI) and Stanford University released ''An Action Plan for Carbon Capture and Storage in California: Opportunities, Challenges, and Solutions,'' a report providing policymakers with options for near-term actions to deploy carbon capture and storage (CCS) to meet the state's climate goals.

'Foreign disinformation' social media campaigns linked to falling vaccination rates
'Foreign disinformation' social media campaigns are linked to falling vaccination rates, reveals an international time trends analysis, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health.

Bat-winged dinosaurs that could glide
Despite having bat-like wings, two small dinosaurs, Yi and Ambopteryx, struggled to fly, only managing to glide clumsily between the trees where they lived, according to a new study led by an international team of researchers, including McGill University Professor Hans Larsson.

Bacterial metabolism of dietary soy may lower risk factor for dementia
A metabolite produced following consumption of dietary soy may decrease a key risk factor for dementia - with the help of the right bacteria, according to a new discovery led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

Thymoquinone induces apoptosis & DNA damage in 5-Fluorouracil-resistant colorectal cancer
Volume 11, Issue 31 from @Oncotarget reported that TQ decreased the expression levels of colorectal stem cell markers CD44 and Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule Ep CAM and proliferation marker Ki67 in colonospheres derived from both cell lines and reduced cellular migration and invasion.

Study helps explain declines in death rates from COVID-19
Fewer New Yorkers are dying from the coronavirus than health experts had anticipated, a new study shows.

New tool can diagnose strokes with a smartphone
A new tool created by researchers at Penn State and Houston Methodist Hospital could diagnose a stroke based on abnormalities in a patient's speech ability and facial muscular movements, and with the accuracy of an emergency room physician -- all within minutes from an interaction with a smartphone.

Multi-mucus barrier segregates colon microbiota from host tissue
Whole-colon imaging in mice has revealed a continuous colonic mucus system, which forms a protective barrier between potentially harmful gut microbiota and host tissue by encapsulating fecal pellets as they form and as they are eliminated from the colon.

New method for upcycling polyethylene creates value from plastic waste
Using a unique catalyst to molecularly deconstruct polyethylene, the most commonly used form of plastic, researchers present a solvent-free way to transform it into higher-value, widely used chemical compounds.

Is spirituality a component of wisdom?
In a recent study, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found a seventh component of wisdom: spirituality.

Tackling alarming decline in nature requires 'safety net' of multiple, ambitious goals
A ''safety net'' made up of multiple ambitious and interlinked goals is needed to tackle nature's alarming decline, according to an international team of researchers analyzing the new goals for biodiversity being drafted by the UN's Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

USC leads massive new artificial intelligence study of Alzheimer's
Forty co-investigators at 11 research centers will team up to leverage artificial intelligence and machine learning to bolster precision diagnostics, prognosis and the development of new treatments for Alzheimer's disease.

COVID-19 study: Meaning in life and self-control protect against stress
During the Corona crisis mental distress increased substantially. What helps people get through this time well?

Humans are born with brains 'prewired' to see words
Humans are born with a part of the brain that is prewired to be receptive to seeing words and letters, setting the stage at birth for people to learn how to read, a new study suggests.

FEFU scientists helped design a new type of ceramics for laser applications
Material scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) joined an international team of researchers to develop new nanocomposite ceramics (Ho3+:Y2O3-MgO) that can be employed in high-capacity laser systems operating in the medium infrared range (IR) of 2-6 micrometers.

Relieving the cost of COVID-19 by Parrondo's paradox
The health and well-being of the population will be affected if the community is kept open, but the lockdown strategy taken on due to COVID-19 also incurs economic and financial impacts.

Eliminating COVID-19: What the world can learn from NZ and Taiwan
Both Taiwan and New Zealand have successfully eliminated COVID-19 with world-leading pandemic responses.

Stigma impacts psychological, physical health of multiracial people
Policy changes can help to fight stigmas of multiracial Americans, one of the fasting growing minority groups in the United States according to a Rutgers University-led study.

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Study provides estimates of the effect of introducing and lifting physical distancing measures on COVID-19 reproduction (R) number
Analysis suggests that individual measures (including school closure, workplace closure, public events ban, ban on gatherings of more than ten people, requirements to stay at home, and internal movement limits) are associated with a reduction in transmission of SARS-CoV-2 but combined measures are more effective at reducing transmission, according to a modelling study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal.

Researchers develop simple way to capture high quality 3d images of live cells and organisms
Researchers have developed a simple method for simultaneously acquiring images at different depths with a standard microscope.

RUDN University chemist suggested synthesizing bioactive substances using a copper catalyst
A chemist from RUDN University used a copper catalyst in the click reaction of triazole synthesis.

The next generation of biodiversity conservation targets must aim higher than ever
Writing this week in Science, 40 researchers argue for a set of holistic actions for new biodiversity goals that are unambiguously clear, sufficiently ambitious, and based on the best knowledge available.

Preventing lead poisoning at the source
Using a variety of public records, researchers from Case Western Reserve University examined every rental property in Cleveland from 2016-18 on factors related to the likelihood that the property could have lead-safety problems.

Details about broadly neutralizing antibodies provide insights for universal flu vaccine
New research from an immunology team at the University of Chicago may shed light on the challenges of developing a universal flu vaccine that would provide long-lasting and broad protection against influenza viruses.

Future VR could employ new ultrahigh-res display
Repurposed solar panel research could be the foundation for a new ultrahigh-resolution microdisplay.

COVID-19 infection may be part of a 'perfect storm' for Parkinson's disease
Can COVID-19 infection increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease?

Nasal septum surgery can affect behaviour, say medics from RUDN University
A team of medics from RUDN University conducted an experiment on rats and confirmed that surgeries in the nasal cavity can cause behavioral changes, namely, make the animals timider.

DNA in fringe-lipped bat poop reveals unexpected eating habits
By examining the poop of the fringe-lipped bat (Trachops cirrhosus), a team at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) encountered surprising results about its eating habits and foraging abilities.

Rapid method of isolating tumor-targeting T cells could propel personalized cancer treatment
When it comes to defeating cancer, some immune cells are mightier than others.

Oregon researchers reveal why heat stress damages sperm
University of Oregon biologists have used the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to identify molecular mechanisms that produce DNA damage in sperm and contribute to male infertility following exposure to heat.

Finally, a way to see molecules 'wobble'
Researchers at the University of Rochester and the Fresnel Institute in France have found a way to visualize those molecules in even greater detail, showing their position and orientation in 3D, and even how they wobble and oscillate.

COVID-19: Dexamethasone discovery carries treatment implications
A new finding about dexamethasone suggests diabetes and other factors may reduce its potentially lifesaving effectiveness for patients with severe COVID-19.

Researchers identify how night-shift work causes internal clock confusion
Night-shift workers face an increased risk of obesity and diabetes, but the underlying reason for that has been a mystery.

Increasing sleep time after trauma could ease ill effects, study says
Increasing the amount of time spent asleep immediately after a traumatic experience may ease any negative consequences, suggests a new study conducted by WSU researchers.

'Mini-lungs' reveal early stages of SARS-CoV-2 infection
'Mini-lungs' grown from tissue donated to Cambridge hospitals has provided a team of scientists from South Korea and the UK with important insights into how COVID-19 damages the lungs.

Time is not on their side: physicians face barriers to voting
Two new UT Southwestern studies published today report some surprising findings: Only half of practicing physicians are registered to vote, and the most common obstacle faced by resident physicians is the lack of time to vote.

Lab-grown mini-lungs mimic the real thing - right down to covid infection
A team of Duke researchers has developed a lab-grown living lung model that mimics the tiny air sacs of the lungs where coronavirus infection and serious lung damage take place.

OSIRIS-REx TAGs surface of asteroid Bennu
Captured on Oct. 20, 2020 during the OSIRIS-REx mission's Touch-And-Go (TAG) sample collection event, this series of images shows the SamCam imager's field of view as the NASA spacecraft approaches and touches down on asteroid Bennu's surface, over 200 million miles away from Earth.

Axillary surgery may not be necessary for all women with invasive breast cancer
More women could potentially be spared an axillary lymph node dissection -- the surgical removal of 10-20 lymph nodes -- a procedure that causes disabling arm swelling in up to 25% of women, according to a UCLA study.

Analyzing web searches can help experts predict, respond to COVID-19 hot spots
Web-based analytics have demonstrated their value in predicting the spread of infectious disease, and a new study from Mayo Clinic indicates the value of analyzing Google web searches for keywords related to COVID-19.

Optical wiring for large quantum computers
Researchers at ETH have demonstrated a new technique for carrying out sensitive quantum operations on atoms.

Aerial images detect and track food security threats for millions of African farmers
New research shows how a combination of imagery from mobile phones, drones and satellites can be used to clamp down on banana threats.

Immune response the probable underlying cause of neural damage in COVID-19
It is probably the immune response to, rather than the virus in itself, that causes sudden confusion and other symptoms from the nervous system in some patients with COVID-19.

Pituitary puzzle gets a new piece, revising evolutionary history
For decades, the front lobe of the pituitary was thought to be an evolutionary development that arose in vertebrates from a particular type of embryonic structure located in the ectoderm.

Wildfires can cause dangerous debris flows
Wildfires don't stop being dangerous after the flames go out.

Researchers solve 'protein paradox' and suggest way to exploit cancer weakness
Researchers from UCPH have discovered how thus far a mysterious function of the so-called MCM proteins protect the human cells against DNA instability, which can cause devastating diseases including cancer.

Multiple sclerosis as the flip side of immune fitness
About half of the people with multiple sclerosis have the HLA-DR15 gene variant.

New experimental blood test determines which pancreatic cancers will respond to treatment
Scientists have developed a simple, experimental blood test that distinguishes pancreatic cancers that respond to treatment from those that do not.

Grafting with epigenetically-modified rootstock yields surprise
Novel grafted plants -- consisting of rootstock epigenetically modified to ''believe'' it has been under stress -- joined to an unmodified scion, or above-ground shoot, give rise to progeny that are more vigorous, productive and resilient than the parental plants.

Study: Malaria-preventive drugs dramatically reduce infections in school children
Use of preventive antimalarial treatments reduces by half the number of malaria infections among schoolchildren, according to a new analysis published today in The Lancet Global Health.

0.5°C matters: Seasonal contrast of rainfall becomes intense in warming target of the Paris agreement
A recent work published in Earth's Future by a team of researchers from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences has found that the seasonal cycle of precipitation is likely to enhance at stabilized 1.5°C and 2°C warming scenarios.

Coronavirus mutations show early safety measures and restrictions limited viral spread
Scientists analyzed genomic information from over 6,000 samples of SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus behind the COVID-19 pandemic.

Researchers develop a simplified method to modify disease signaling with light
Cellular optogenetics is a technique that allows researchers to use light to precisely control cell signaling and function in space and time enabling the investigation of mechanisms involved in disease processes.

Do asymptomatic kids with COVID-19 carry less virus?
New questions are at the forefront as a study published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology from nine children's hospitals finds that most asymptomatic children who tested positive for COVID-19 had relatively low levels of the virus compared to symptomatic children.

AI detects hidden earthquakes
Tiny movements in Earth's outermost layer may provide a Rosetta Stone for deciphering the physics and warning signs of big quakes.

Shared religious experiences bring couples together
Couples that pray together stay together. It's a common religious saying, but a new study from the University of Georgia is giving the proverb some scientific credence.

Voters unlikely to blame politicians for their handling of the pandemic at next election
Politicians are unlikely to be punished or rewarded for their failures or successes in managing the coronavirus pandemic at the next election, suggests an analysis of survey data from the US, the UK and India, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health.

NRL researchers evaluate ultraviolet sources, combat COVID-19
NRL researchers evaluated commercial ultraviolet (UV) sources for viral disinfection to combat COVID-19 on land and at sea, and established a dedicated UV characterization lab in five days.

Ineffective regulation on discharge from hospital in England leaves patients at risk
Regulators have failed to properly address patient safety on discharge from hospital in England, leaving the physical wellbeing and dignity of patients continuously at risk at a time when they should be returning safely home, finds new research.

For the first time: Realistic simulation of plasma edge instabilities in tokamaks
Among the loads to which the plasma vessel in a fusion device may be exposed, so-called edge localised modes are particularly undesirable.

Research shows aging chimps, like humans, value friendships
Chimpanzee and human friendships show many parallels, according to new research published this week in Science by associate professor Martin Muller at The University of New Mexico Anthropology department, associate professor of Anthropology and co-director of the Comparative Human and Primate Physiology Center Melissa Emery Thompson, and their colleagues.
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