Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 26, 2020
Weight-reduction surgery for severely obese adults may prevent second heart attack, death
Adults with severe obesity (BMI >35) and a prior heart attack who undergo weight-reduction surgery may lower their risk of a second heart attack, major cardiovascular event, heart failure and death.

Shifts in flowering phases of plants due to reduced insect density
A research group of the University of Jena and the iDiv has discovered that insects have a decisive influence on the biodiversity and flowering phases of plants.

Powering the future: new insights into how alkali-metal doped flexible solar cells work
A group of scientists from Korea has discovered that the amount of alkali metal introduced into crystals of flexible thin-film solar cells influences the path that charge carriers take to traverse between electrodes, thereby affecting the light-to-electricity conversion efficiency of the solar cell.

Hydrogen sulfide helps maintain your drive to breathe
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that the production of hydrogen sulfide gas is necessary to breathe normally.

Irregular appearances of glacial and interglacial climate states
AWI researcher Peter Köhler has now discovered that the irregular appearance of interglacials has been more frequent than previously thought.

Treating spinal mets with fewer, higher doses of radiation reduces pain more effectively
A new study shows using fewer and higher doses of high-precision radiation therapy is a more effective approach for treating painful spinal tumors than conventional radiation therapy.

High-thermoresistant biopolyimides become water-soluble like starch
This is the first report for the syntheses of water-soluble polyimides which are Interestingly derived from bio-based resources, showing high transparency, tunable mechanical strength and the highest thermoresistance in water-soluble polymers reported ever.

New genes related to autism spectrum disorder
The lack of some genes in the BEC/TCEAL cluster could be related to some alterations associated with the autism spectrum disorder, according to a preclinical study published in the journal Genome Biology, and led by Professor Jordi Garcia Fernàndez, from the Faculty of Biology and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Barcelona (IBUB), and researcher Jaime Carvajal, from the Andalusian Centre for Developmental Biology - University Pablo de Olavide (CSIC-UPO).

The uncertain future of the oceans
Marine food webs and biogeochemical cycles react very sensitively to the increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) - but the effects are far more complex than previously thought.

Concrete structure's lifespan extended by a carbon textile
The Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology (KICT) has announced the development of an effective structural strengthening method using a noncombustible carbon textile grid and cement mortar, which can double the load-bearing capacities of structurally deficient concrete structures and increase their usable lifespan by threefold.

3D printing the first ever biomimetic tongue surface
Scientists have created synthetic soft surfaces with tongue-like textures for the first time using 3D printing, opening new possibilities for testing oral processing properties of food, nutritional technologies, pharmaceutics and dry mouth therapies.

Wrinkled 'super pea' could be added to foods to reduce diabetes risk
A type of wrinkled 'super pea' may help control blood sugar levels and could reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, suggests a new study.

New insights into a potential target for autoimmune disease
With insights into a molecular pathway that regulates the activity of Tregs, a type of T cell involved in immunosuppression, research by the University of Pennsylvania's George Hajishengallis and colleagues opens up possibly new avenues for treating inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

On-surface synthesis of graphene nanoribbons could advance quantum devices
An international multi-institution team of scientists has synthesized graphene nanoribbons -- ultrathin strips of carbon atoms -- on a titanium dioxide surface using an atomically precise method that removes a barrier for custom-designed carbon nanostructures required for quantum information sciences.

How to prevent the spread of tumor cells via the lymph vessels
Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center and the Mannheim Medical Faculty of the University of Heidelberg identified a new way to block the dangerous spread of tumor cells via lymphatic vessels.

A heart-breast cancer-on-a-chip monitoring system
Dual-organ system enables the measurement of cardiac toxicity arising from breast cancer chemotherapy.

A blast of gas for better solar cells
Treating silicon with carbon dioxide gas in plasma processing brings simplicity and control to a key step for making solar cells.

Surprised researchers: Number of leopards in northern China on the rise
Most of the world's leopards are endangered and generally, the number of these shy and stunning cats is decreasing.

Duke-NUS study uncovers why bats excel as viral reservoirs without getting sick
Study confirms bats adopt multiple strategies to reduce pro-inflammatory responses, thus mitigating potential immune-mediated tissue damage and disease.

Mythbusting: 5 common misperceptions surrounding the environmental impacts of single-use plastics
Stand in the soda pop aisle at the supermarket, surrounded by rows of brightly colored plastic bottles and metal cans, and it's easy to conclude that the main environmental problem here is an overabundance of single-use containers: If we simply recycled more of them, we'd go a long way toward minimizing impacts.

ALS and frontotemporal dementia: early diagnosis thanks to an experimental test
A test to diagnose two very serious diseases such as ALS and FTD when the pathologies have not yet appeared: a new methodology succeeds in detecting the protein TDP-43 - the same that accumulates in the brain of patients - even when it is present in minute quantities in the body.

New map of the immune landscape in pancreatic cancer could guide immunotherapy
A new analysis highlights the diversity of immune response in pancreatic cancer, and points toward the need for treatments tailored to individual patients.

Tiny golden bullets could help tackle asbestos-related cancers
Gold nanotubes - tiny hollow cylinders one thousandth the width of a human hair - could be used to treat mesothelioma, a type of cancer caused by exposure to asbestos, according to a team of researchers at the Universities of Cambridge and Leeds.

Scientists develop genetic 'monitors' that detect when genes are active
Genetic sensors that can detect the activity from genes, rather than just the genes themselves, have been developed by a team led by University of Warwick scientists.

Odds are good for unique 2D compound
Rice University engineers make 2D materials for valleytronics, a platform for information processing and storage that relies on the manipulation of electrons' positions in energetic 'valleys.'

War songs and lullabies behind origins of music
Love is not the primary reason humans developed music. A new evolutionary theory of the origins of music argues more evidence supports music coming from the need for groups to impress allies and foes, and for parents to signal their attention to infants.

New control architecture defends complex interconnected systems against cyberattacks
Distributed systems are becoming more and more essential in everyday life.

Illinois study tracks evolution of SARS-CoV-2 virus mutations
Since COVID-19 began its menacing march across Wuhan, China, in December 2019, and then across the world, the SARS-CoV-2 virus has taken a 'whatever works' strategy to ensure its replication and spread.

Brazilian youth's important role in fight against climate change - study
Marginalised young people in Brazilian cities can play an important role in responding to the threat of climate change, but youth engagement needs to be both 'playful' and take youth 'seriously' to support them in expressing their full potential in bringing about local change according to a new study.

State gun laws may help curb violence across state lines: study
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health researchers find that strong state firearm laws are associated with fewer firearm homicides--both within the state where the laws are enacted and across state lines.

Breast cancer risk and disease-causing mutations in women over age 65
In a new study presented at the ASHG 2020 Virtual Meeting, researchers investigated the prevalence of disease-causing variants in established breast cancer predisposition genes in women over age 65.

Ontario should vaccinate newborns for hepatitis B, study suggests
Not all pregnant women are universally screened for hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Ontario, even though this screening is recommended, and the majority of those who test positive do not receive follow-up testing or interventions, leading to infections of newborns, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Discovery adds new species to Rice lab's ghoulish insect menagerie
A horrifying insect soap opera with vampires, mummies and infant-eating parasites plays out on the stems and leaves of oak trees every day, and Rice University evolutionary biologist Scott Egan found the latest player, a new species of predatory wasp, within walking distance of his lab.

DNA sleuths target ivory poachers
The tiniest amount of DNA is being accurately analysed to identify the origins of old ivory.

Cancer anti-sickness drug offers hope for hallucinations in Parkinson's
A world-first double-blind clinical trial, will investigate if a powerful drug used to treat nausea in chemotherapy patients, could alleviate hallucinations in people with Parkinson's.

Couples share heart disease risk factors and behaviors
In 79 percent of couples, both people fell into the non-ideal category for cardiovascular health, with most sharing unhealthy diets and getting inadequate exercise.

Hospitalizations for chronic disease, acute conditions during COVID-19
Researchers looked at the frequency of hospitalization for all non-COVID-19-related conditions in a New York health system during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dog training methods help JHU teach robots to learn new tricks
With a training technique commonly used to teach dogs to sit and stay, Johns Hopkins University computer scientists showed a robot how to teach itself several new tricks, including stacking blocks.

Medicine and grief during the COVID-19 era
The difficulties associated with mourning in the time of COVID-19 are discussed in this essay.

Genetic predisposition to increased weight is protective for breast and prostate cancer
A research study presented at the ASHG 2020 Virtual Meeting suggests that found that increasing weight is causally protective for breast and prostate cancer.

Timeline of early eukaryotic evolution unveiled
By analyzing duplicates of thousands of genes, researchers have reconstructed the evolutionary events leading to the creation of eukaryotic cells, the precursors to virtually all life you can see with the naked eye.

Phytoplasma effector proteins devastate host plants through molecular mimicry
'Our group has been studying the proteins that are targeted by the phytoplasma effector proteins for almost 30 years,' said Günter Theißen, one of the scientists involved in the study.

Emerging treatment helps reverse heart failure in some patients
In a new multicenter study, researchers report that an emerging heart failure treatment could potentially reverse structural damage to the heart, allowing it to heal itself over time.

Poverty linked to higher risk of death in children with cancer undergoing transplant
Despite the increasing use and promise of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as curative therapy for children with cancer and other life-threatening diseases, new research suggests that children transplanted for cancer are more likely to die from treatment-related complications if they live in poorer neighborhoods.

Ancient lake contributed to past San Andreas fault ruptures
he San Andreas fault, which runs along the western coast of North America and crosses dense population centers like Los Angeles, California, is one of the most-studied faults in North America because of its significant hazard risk.

Oncotarget: An integrative microenvironment approach for follicular lymphoma
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 33 features Figure 8, ''Haplotype estimates in follicular lymphoma patients,'' by Assis-Mendonça, et al. which reported that the authors tested associations between SNPs, clinicopathological features and TME composition, and proposed survival models in R-CHOP/R-CVP-treated patients.

Haunted house researchers investigate the mystery of playing with fear
Haunted houses, horror movies, and ghost stories can be chilling delights, provided the fear they evoke remains in a 'Goldilocks zone' that is neither too terrifying nor too tame.

Taking the itch out of cancer immunotherapy
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have determined that PD-1 expression on CD8 T cells is the biological pathway that leads to psoriasis-like dermatitis, an unfavorable side effect of cancer immunotherapy with PD-1 inhibitors.

UCF researcher is working to extend battery life in smartphones, electric cars
A University of Central Florida researcher is working to make portable devices and electric vehicles stay charged longer by extending the life of the rechargeable lithium-ion batteries powering them.

Radiosurgery reduces cognitive decline without compromising survival for pts with 4+ brain mets
Results of a new randomized phase III trial suggest that stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) should replace whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) as the standard of care for patients with four or more brain metastases.

Improved survival after obesity operation in patients with previous myocardial infarction
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Danderyd Hospital in Sweden have studied the risk of additional myocardial infarctions and early death in severely obese patients who undergo metabolic surgery following a myocardial event.

Research provides a new understanding of how a model insect species sees color
Through an effort to characterize the color receptors in the eyes of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, University of Minnesota researchers discovered the spectrum of light it can see deviates significantly from what was previously recorded.

Coronavirus volunteers: Greater satisfaction thanks to online platforms
Shortly after the lockdown began, a huge number of volunteers signed up to help people in coronavirus risk groups - primarily via online platforms.

MFS Is a strong surrogate endpoint for OS for men receiving salvage RT for recurrent prostate cancer
An analysis of the phase III NRG Oncology clinical trial RTOG 9601 on men receiving salvage radiotherapy (SRT) following prostatectomy for recurrent prostate cancer indicated that, while biochemical failure (BF) was not a strong surrogate endpoint to determine overall survival (OS), metastasis-free survival (MFS) was in this patient population.

Microplastics in groundwater (and our drinking water) present unknown risk
Microplastics (plastics <5mm) and their negative health impacts have been studied in oceans, rivers, and even soils, and scientists are beginning to grapple with the myriad human health impacts their presence might have.

Personal and financial costs of ADHD in Australia revealed
Researchers have revealed the key factors that can improve outcomes in children with ADHD, a disorder that costs Australia US$13 billion a year in social and economic losses.

Scientists establish NanDeSyn Database to support international cooperation on industrial microalgae
To promote resource sharing and research cooperation for the synthetic biology and molecular breeding of industrial oil-producing microalgae, an international team led by Single-Cell Center (SCC), Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), has released the ''NanDeSyn Database'' (http://www.nandesyn.org).

Single brain region links depression and anxiety, heart disease, and treatment sensitivity
Over-activity in a single brain region called the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) underlies several key symptoms of mood and anxiety disorders, but an antidepressant only successfully treats some of the symptoms.

Solar hydrogen: let's consider the stability of photoelectrodes
As part of an international collaboration, a team at the HZB has examined the corrosion processes of high-quality BiVO4 photoelectrodes using different state-of-the-art characterisation methods.

Hard physical work significantly increases the risk of dementia
Men in jobs with hard physical work have a higher risk of developing dementia compared to men doing sedentary work, new research from the University of Copenhagen reveals.

Penn Study supports use of radiation before CAR therapy for multiple myeloma
Administering radiation therapy to multiple myeloma patients waiting for CAR T cells to be manufactured was found to be safe and undisruptive to CAR T therapy.

Motorists' smartphones may help highways bosses keep roads safe
Motorists with smartphones could help highway chiefs maintain road quality by sending 'crowdsourced' data from their mobiles that would allow engineers to assess when carriageway repairs are needed, according to a new study.

CRISPR screen identifies genes, drug targets to protect against SARS-CoV-2 infection
Study demonstrates how changes in human genes can reduce SARS-CoV-2 infection and describes a wide array of genes that have not previously been considered as therapeutic targets for SARS-CoV-2.

Liver cancer diagnoses and deaths impacted by geography and household income
An analysis of information from a large U.S. cancer database indicates that patients with liver cancer from rural regions and lower income households often have more advanced cancer at the time of diagnosis and face a higher risk of death compared with other patients.

Bridges with limb-inspired architecture can withstand earthquakes, cut repair costs
Structural damage to any of the nation's ailing bridges can come with a hefty price of billions of dollars in repairs.

Risk score predicts prognosis of outpatients with COVID-19
A new artificial intelligence-based score considers multiple factors to predict the prognosis of individual patients with COVID-19 seen at urgent care clinics or emergency departments.

Neuron-based gene expression study reveals insights on fear and its regulation
The expression of a gene called CREB in certain neurons may function as a switch to regulate feelings of fear and its extinction.

New York City's coronavirus outbreak spread from more European sources than first reported
The COVID-19 pandemic started earlier than previously thought in New York City and Long Island by dozens of people infected mostly with strains from Europe.

Making biodiesel from dirty old cooking oil just got way easier
Researchers develop a new sponge-like catalyst that is so tough it can make biodiesel from low-grade ingredients containing up to 50% contaminants.

Changes in hospital volumes for common medical emergencies during COVID-19
Whether the number of cases at hospitals of common medical emergencies such as heart attack and appendicitis have changed during the COVID-19 pandemic was investigated in this study.

Racial, socioeconomic disparities in extensive-stage small cell lung cancer treatment
A new study shows that Black individuals with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer are less likely to receive chemotherapy for their disease compared to white and other racial groups.

Kid influencers are promoting junk food brands on YouTube -- garnering more than a billion views
Kids with wildly popular YouTube channels are frequently promoting unhealthy food and drinks in their videos, warn researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health and NYU Grossman School of Medicine in a new study published in the journal Pediatrics.

T-Cells from recovered COVID-19 patients show promise to protect vulnerable patients from infection
T-cells taken from the blood of people who recovered from a COVID-19 infection can be successfully multiplied in the lab and maintain the ability to effectively target proteins that are key to the virus's function, according to a new study published Oct.

Estimating risk of airborne COVID-19 with mask usage, social distancing
In Physics of Fluids, researchers used a model to understand airborne transmission that is designed to be accessible to a wide range of people, including nonscientists.

Photon IMRT treatment group displays no significant survival difference between arms
A preliminary analysis of photon therapy treatment group 1 from the phase II NRG Oncology clinical trial NRG-BN001 indicates that there is no statistically significant overall survival (OS) or toxicity differences between dose-intensification radiation therapy (DI-RT) using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and standard-dose radiation therapy (SD-RT) with temozolomide treatments for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM).

How cells use mechanical tension sensors to interact with their environment
In a painstaking experiment, scientists suspended a single protein filament between two microscopic beads.

Effectiveness of gemcitabine & daily RT for bladder preservation in muscle-invasive bladder cancer
Bladder preservation with trimodality therapy can be a safe and effective alternative to cystectomy for selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

Dartmouth study examines well water testing promotion in pediatric primary care
Findings from a new study conducted by a team of researchers at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and published in the journal Preventive Medicine Reports, show that involving pediatric practices in the promotion of private well water testing can influence parental compliance.

Hidden losses deep in the Amazon rainforest
New research shows that animal patterns are changing in the absence of landscape change, which signals a sobering warning that simply preserving forests will not maintain rainforest biodiversity.

Air pollution, green space and built environment characteristics may influence body mass index durin
A new study of almost 80,000 children living in urban areas of Catalonia has, for the first time, analysed the relationship between urban exposures and BMI growth trajectories

ACP leaders urge consideration of presidential candidates' proposals for better US health care
As voters cast their ballots, it is important for them to know the health care proposals of the two presidential candidates and how they will address and improve the U.S. health care system especially in light of the problems with the system that have been underscored this year during the COVID-19 pandemic, say leaders from the American College of Physicians (ACP).

Nearly one in three young adults in the US does not know common stroke symptoms
Nearly 30% of U.S. adults younger than 45 don't know all five of the most common stroke symptoms, according to a recent survey.

Destroying cancer cells with non-surgical ultrasound treatment
Dr. Ki Joo Pahk's research team at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology Center for Bionics confirmed the possibility of precisely fractionating target tumor cells, as though it is cut out using a knife, without causing heat damage to any other part of the body by using high-intensity focused ultrasound.

Low cost, customized prosthesis using 3D printing
The Singapore University of Technology and Design, together with Singapore's Tan Tock Seng Hospital, developed a novel 3D printed non-metallic self-locking prosthetic arm for a patient with a forequarter amputation - it is more comfortable, flexible and 20% cheaper than a conventional prosthesis.

Researcher found female candidates are more likely to discuss the economy than males
In a new study published in Politics & Policy, Deserai Crow, PhD, associate professor at the University of Colorado Denver in the School of Public Affairs, found significant differences in discussion topics between both party affiliation and gender.

Rice rolls out next-gen nanocars
Rice University researchers continue to advance the science of single-molecule machines with a new lineup of nanocars, in anticipation of the next international Nanocar Race in 2022.

The BrainHealth project could create a resilient economy
Scientists at Center for BrainHealth® worked with researchers across the world to develop a science-based plan that could help the economy recover and prevent similar collapses in the future.

Best practices for COVID-19-positive or exposed mothers--breastfeeding and pumping milk
This Patient Page offers breastfeeding and pumping milk guidelines for mothers who have tested positive for COVID-19, who have been exposed to COVID-19 or work in a setting with increased risk of exposure to the virus.

The Darwinian diet: you are what you eat
Ant farmers in tropical forests respond to the nutritional needs of their fungus gardens.

Can scientists take the STING out of common respiratory viruses?
University of North Carolina School of Medicine scientists have made a curious discovery about a well-known human protein that helps the immune system fight viral infections.

Data reveals evidence of molecular absorption in the atmosphere of a hot Neptune
An international team of scientists recently measured the spectrum of the atmosphere of a rare hot Neptune exoplanet, whose discovery by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) was announced just last month.

Researchers present findings on role of google search early in COVID-19 pandemic
A team from the George Washington University will present at the American College of Emergency Physicians annual conference, on results of their study exploring the role of Google searches during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States.

Impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal species on heterodera glycines
University of Illinois and USDA plant pathologists found that several different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi species from different families reduced the number of cysts on soybean roots by 59 to 80 percent.

A molecular break for root growth
The dynamic change in root growth of plants plays an important role in their adjustment to soil conditions.

Stanford researchers reveal US corn crop's growing sensitivity to drought
New management approaches and technology have allowed the US. Corn Belt to increase yields despite some changes in climate.

1 in 12 parents say their teen has attended a demonstration about racism or police reform
A growing number of demonstrators taking to the streets to protest police brutality and racial injustice may include teenagers, a new national poll suggests.

Drug-resistant hospital bacteria persist even after deep cleaning
Scientists have used genome sequencing to reveal the extent to which a drug-resistant gastrointestinal bacterium can spread within a hospital, highlighting the challenge hospitals face in controlling infections.

Healthcare as a climate solution
Although the link may not be obvious, healthcare and climate change -- two issues that pose major challenges around the world -- are in fact more connected than society may realize.

Modern computational tools may open a new era for fossil pollen research
By integrating machine-learning technology with high-resolution imaging, scientists are improving the taxonomic resolution of fossil pollen identifications and greatly enhancing the use of pollen data in ecological and evolutionary research.

New COVID-19 related genes -- helpful and harmful -- found in massive screen
Researchers at Yale University and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard screened hundreds of millions of cells exposed to the COVID-19 and MERS viruses and identified dozens of genes that both enable the viruses to replicate in cells and also those that seem to slam the door on the virus.

City, University of London academics develop algorithm to analyse HeLa cancer cells
Dr Constantino Carlos Reyes-Aldasoro and Dr Cefa Karabag collaborate with the Francis Crick Institute on a novel approach published in the PLoS ONE journal, which significantly reduces the amount of time taken to analyse the cell line named after Henrietta Lacks, an African-American woman whose contribution to medical science was only formally acknowledged decades after her death.

Most dentists have experienced aggression from patients
Roughly half of US dentists experienced verbal or reputational aggression by patients in the past year, and nearly one in four endured physical aggression, according to a new study led by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry.

Summer road trip finds small streams have big impacts on Great Lakes
While decades of monitoring and regulatory efforts have paid little attention to Lake Michigan's tiny tributaries, new research shows that they play an outsized role in feeding algae blooms and impacting coastal waters.

'What wound did ever heal but by degrees?' delayed wound healing due to gene mutations
Scientists at Fujita Health University, Japan, have discovered how deficiencies of the IL-36Ra protein -- caused by mutations in the IL36RN gene -- delay wound healing via the flooding of the wound with several types of immune cells.

Land management in forest and grasslands: How much can we intensify?
Intensive land-use reduces beneficial effects of biodiversity on ecosystem services.

Severity of depressive symptoms among at-risk individuals during COVID-19
The levels of severity of depressive symptoms among at-risk individuals during the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK were examined in this study.

Cell-Free DNA provides a dynamic window into health
A new study presented at the ASHG 2020 Virtual Meeting shows how cfDNA testing can be used to provide insight into a patient's health.

COVID-19 and the athletic heart
This article summarizes findings on the approach for return to play in athletes in various age groups who have recovered from COVID-19.

Tiny moon shadows may harbor hidden stores of ice
Hidden pockets of water could be much more common on the surface of the moon than scientists once suspected, according to new research led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

New technology tracks role of macrophages in cancer spread
A Morgridge imaging study of macrophages -- immune cells that are important to human health, but paradoxically can help some cancers grow and spread -- is offering better ways to understand these cells and target them with immunotherapies.

High fat or 'ketogenic' diets could prevent, reverse heart failure
Research from Saint Louis University finds that high fat or ''ketogenic'' diets could completely prevent, or even reverse heart failure caused by a metabolic process.

UCalgary researchers discover new tactic to stop the growth of a deadly brain cancer
UCalgary scientists and members of the Clark H. Smith Brain Tumour Centre at the Arnie Charbonneau Cancer Institute at the Cumming School of Medicine have discovered a way to stop the growth of glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer.

Robots help to answer age-old question of why fish school
Study using biomimetic fish-like robots shows that swimming closely together offers fish hydrodynamic benefits - research project with participation from University of Konstanz researchers provides first experimental validation of an answer to an old question.

The first ever international Wounds Week was a resounding success
The 8th International Skin Integrity and Infection Prevention Conference: Demystifying Wound Infection: Improving Patient Outcomes was redesigned into an online Wounds Week and has proved to be so successful it will most certainly happen again.

Gut bacteria associated with animal-based diet may mitigate risk of cardiovascular disease
Researchers have found that a type of common gut bacteria sometimes associated with inflammation, abscesses, bowel disease and cancer has a major silver lining: It seems to help prevent cardiovascular disease.

Some rectal cancer patients can safely avoid an aggressive operation
A nonsurgical treatment option for rectal cancer that preserves quality of life is safe for carefully selected patients, according to a new study comparing it with the standard operation.

A simple, cost-effective molecular assay may help manage growing spread of drug-resistant gonorrhea
A drug-resistant strain of the Neisseria (N.) gonorrhoeae has emerged around the world with the potential to make gonorrhea untreatable.

Former rebel groups become more moderate after gaining political power in nations with democracy, research shows
Former rebel groups who transform into political parties have adopted a moderate stance after gaining power in more democratic political systems, a study shows.

Study finds PTSD interacts with klotho gene, may cause premature aging in the brain
Genetics and the environment (including psychiatric stress) may contribute to the pace of cellular aging, causing some individuals to have a biological age that exceeds their chronological age.

Wildlife flock to backyards for food from people
A new study helps explain why some animals are sometimes more often found in suburban areas than wild ones.

COVID-19 containment shaped by strength, duration of natural, vaccine-induced immunity
New research suggests that the impact of natural and vaccine-induced immunity will be key factors in shaping the future trajectory of the global coronavirus pandemic, known as COVID-19.

Adding advanced PET scans to radiation plans for prostate cancer increases FFS rates
Adding the advanced PET radiotracer fluciclovine to conventional imaging to help guide radiation treatments for recurrent prostate cancer can improve disease-free survival rates, a new study finds.

For pregnant women with heart disease, multidisciplinary care may be essential
Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of maternal mortality in the United States, but a new study suggests specialized cardio-obstetrics teams may improve outcomes.

UM researcher proposes sea-level rise global observing system
University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researcher Shane Elipot proposes a new approach to monitoring global sea-level rise.

Light on efficiency loss in organic solar cells
A deeper understanding of efficiency-limiting processes provides design rules for organic solar cell materials.

FSU researchers investigate material properties for longer-lasting, more efficient solar cells
FSU researchers are helping to understand the fundamental processes in a material known as perovskites, work that could lead to more efficient solar cells that also do a better job of resisting degradation.

Tracking the Himalayan history from the evolution of hundreds of frogs, lizards and snakes
We examined two hypotheses about the uplift of the Himalaya based on biotic assembly through time of the herpetofauna.

Evenness is important in assessing progress towards sustainable development goals
Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) emphasize a holistic achievement instead of cherry-picking a few.

Study shows how exercise stalls cancer growth through the immune system
People with cancer who exercise generally have a better prognosis than inactive patients.

Common liverwort study has implications for crop manipulation
A new study on genetic pathways in the common liverwort could have future implications for crop manipulation.

People with type 2 diabetes need not avoid eating potatoes based on glycemic index
People with type 2 Diabetes (T2D) are frequently told to avoid eating potatoes, and other high Glycemic Index (GI) foods, because of the longstanding perception that these foods make it difficult to control blood sugar levels.

Group trial bolsters case for stereotactic radiation for tumors that travel to the lungs
A new study, conducted across 13 medical centers in Australia and New Zealand, strengthens the case for radiation therapy as a treatment for cancer that has begun to spread throughout the body.

SwRI study offers more complete view of massive asteroid Psyche
A new study authored by Southwest Research Institute planetary scientist Dr.

From sea to shining sea: new survey reveals state-level opinions on climate change
A new report analyzing state-level opinions on climate change finds the majority of Americans believe in and want action on climate change--but factors like state politics and local climate play important roles.

Why do certain chemotherapies increase the likelihood of blood cancer?
MSK investigators uncover new findings about the relationship between clonal hematopoiesis in cancer patients and the risk of later developing a treatment-related blood cancer.

Floating gardens: More than just a pretty place
Floating gardens sound so idyllic. Now, a study proves that they are more than just a pretty place.

Uncertainties key to balancing flood risk and cost in elevating houses
What do you have on your 2020 Bingo Card? Wildfire, heat wave, global pandemic, or flooding?

Aged cell variations may control health and onset of age-related diseases
Researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan have proposed that cellular senescence variations during the aging process could lead to control of health and onset of age-related diseases.

Divide and conquer: a new formula to minimize 'mathemaphobia'
Maths - it's the subject some kids love to hate, yet despite its lack of popularity, mathematics is critical for a STEM-capable workforce and vital for Australia's current and future productivity.

Insights into the genetic architecture of penicillin allergy
In a study presented at the ASHG 2020 Annual Meeting, researchers found that thehistocompatibility complex gene HLA-B in penicillin allergy.

How to figure out what you don't know
Sometimes, what seems like a good way to explain the world--a model--turns out to be wrong.

Global 'BiteMap' reveals how marine food webs may change with climate
Where are small marine animals most vulnerable to getting eaten?

Localized vaccination surveillance could help prevent measles outbreaks
Access to more localized data on childhood vaccination coverage, such as at the school or neighborhood levels, could help better predict and prevent measles outbreaks in the United States, according to a new University of Michigan study.
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