Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 30, 2020
Collecting sperm from Covid-19 patients
How does Covid-19 affect sperm and thus the next generation´s immune system?

A new spin on atoms gives scientists a closer look at quantum weirdness
A team of researchers has developed a new way to control and measure atoms that are so close together no optical lens can distinguish them.

A malformation illustrates the incredible plasticity of the brain
One in 4,000 people is born without a corpus callosum, a brain structure consisting of neural fibres that are used to transfer information between hemisphere.

New non-allergenic, anti-inflammatory fragrance can be game changer for dry skin sufferers
Researchers have developed a novel allergen-depleted and anti-inflammatory fragrance that can be used in moisturisers for people with extremely dry, xerotic skin.

Most isolated massive stars are kicked out of their clusters
A pair of University of Michigan studies reveals how some massive stars -- stars eight or more times the mass of our sun--become isolated in the universe: most often, their star clusters kick them out.

Sexual health often overlooked in cancer survivorship care, especially for female patients
A new study points to a need for oncologists to ask their patients about sexual health after chemotherapy, radiation and other cancer treatments.

Asteroid's scars tell stories of its past
Asteroid Bennu, which was just sampled by NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission, only recently migrated into Earth's neighborhood, according to a detailed analysis of impact marks on boulders on its surface.

China's most important trees are hiding in plain sight
A research collaboration between Chinese and American scientists has synthesized long-term biodiversity data from 12 immense forest study plots spanning 1,500 miles, from China's far north to its southern tropics.

Stereotypes and discrimination contribute to HIV-related stigma among nursing staff
To describe the attitudes of the university nursing faculty toward caring for PLHIV; and to identify the relationship between faculty attitudes and explanatory factors such as age, education, religion, nationality, teaching in a clinical setting, years of experience, and university attributes.

Photopharmacology - A light-trigger for the proteasome
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have designed a light-sensitive inhibitor that can control cell division and cell death - and provides a promising approach for studies of essential cellular processes and the development of novel tumor therapies.

New drone technology improves ability to forecast volcanic eruptions
Specially-adapted drones developed by a UCL-led international team have been gathering data from never-before-explored volcanoes that will enable local communities to better forecast future eruptions.

Stars and skulls: New ESO image reveals eerie nebula
This ethereal remnant of a long dead star, nestled in the belly of The Whale, bears an uneasy resemblance to a skull floating through space.

Mobile smartphone technology is associated with better clinical outcomes for OHCA
Mobile smartphone technology can accelerate first responder dispatch and may be instrumental to improving out?of?hospital cardiac arrest (OCHA) survival.

Well oriented
Polypropylene (PP) is one of the most widely used plastics in the world.

Specially-adapted drones gather data from unexplored volcanoes to better forecast eruptions
Specially-adapted drones developed by an international team have been gathering data from never-before-explored volcanoes that will enable local communities to better forecast future eruptions.

VUMC study finds faster, wider spread of COVID-19 in US households
COVID-19 spreads faster and more widely throughout US households than previously reported, according to new preliminary research from a multicenter study led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers and published in MMWR, a weekly report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

COVID-19 a "golden opportunity" for terror organisations to intensify their propaganda
The uncertainty and confusion caused by the COVID-19 pandemic is being ''widely exploited by terror groups for spinning a plethora of sinister schemes'', which could lead to a new tide of violence against people and governments.

Giving the immune system a double boost against cancer
Cancer immunotherapies are very effective for some patients, but many cancers do not respond to the currently available treatments.

Children with asymptomatic brain bleeds as newborns show normal brain development at age 2
A study by UNC researchers finds that neurodevelopmental scores and gray matter volumes at age two years did not differ between children who had MRI-confirmed asymptomatic subdural hemorrhages when they were neonates, compared to children with no history of subdural hemorrhage.

For Black LGBQ+ Americans, intersectional experiences can hurt -- or help, YSPH study finds
Using a new method for quantifying intersectional experiences, a new Yale School of Public Health study finds that Black LGBQ+ Americans tend to feel better about themselves after encountering events that affirm their identity.

New study reveals United States a top source of plastic pollution in coastal environments
The United States ranks as high as third among countries contributing to coastal plastic pollution when taking into account its scrap plastic exports as well as the latest figures on illegal dumping and littering in the country.

Researchers devise new method to get the lead out
Researchers in the lab of Daniel Giammar, in McKelvey School of Engineering have devised a simple, quick and inexpensive way to quantify how much lead is trapped by a water filter.

To survive asteroid impact, algae learned to hunt
Tiny, seemingly harmless ocean plants survived the darkness of the asteroid strike that killed the dinosaurs by learning a ghoulish behavior -- eating other living creatures.

First Australian night bees recorded foraging in darkness
Australian bees are known for pollinating plants on beautiful sunny days, but a new study has identified two species that have adapted their vision for night-time conditions for the first time.

Carbon-releasing 'zombie fires' in peatlands could be dampened by new findings
New simulations have provided clues on reducing uncontrolled peat fires, which hide underground and are notoriously bad for human health and the environment.

New fault zone measurements could help us to understand subduction earthquake
University of Tsukuba researchers have conducted detailed structural analyses of a fault zone in central Japan to identify the specific conditions that lead to devastating earthquake.

The order of life
A new model that describes the organization of organisms could lead to a better understanding of biological processes

Healthcare app reduces symptoms of COPD compared to regular treatment
A Southampton-developed healthcare app that helps people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) manage their condition can speed up recovery after hospital admission and reduce flare-ups of symptoms, a newly published study has shown.

Physician burnout, sleep disorders
Researchers investigated the association between sleep disorders and symptoms of burnout among faculty and staff in a large teaching hospital system.

Difficult to build a family after exposure to chemical weapons
People who have been exposed to chemical warfare agents (CWAs) feel uncertain, decades after the exposure, about their survival and ability to build a family, a University of Gothenburg study shows.

Cancer patients, clinicians find value in electronic real-time symptom
Both cancer patients and their medical teams found it beneficial when patients shared their symptoms in real time using a web- or telephone-based reporting system, according to a national multi-institutional study led by researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Galaxies in the very early universe were surprisingly mature
Massive galaxies were already much more mature in the early universe than previously expected.

Wistar creates a new synthetic DNA vaccine against Powassan virus
Wistar scientists have designed and tested the first-of-its-kind synthetic DNA vaccine against Powassan virus (POWV), targeting portions of the virus envelope protein.

Water on ancient Mars
A meteorite that originated on Mars billions of years ago reveals details of ancient impact events on the red planet.

In a hurry to develop drugs? Here's your cHAT
Rice University scientists develop cHAT to simplify the reduction of alkenes to more useful intermediate molecules for drugs and other useful chemical compounds.

New artificial skin functions like natural skin
Researchers at RIKEN in Japan have developed an improved human-skin equivalent that reproduces a property that controls the structure and physiological function of skin.

Dynamic photonic barcodes record energy transfer at the biointerface
Chen's group recently developed bioresponsive dynamic barcodes, introducing the concept of resonance energy transfer at the interface of the microcavity.

Collective impact partnership models help close health care workforce gap
New research published in the VASCD Journal, A Case Study in Growing the Health Workforce Pipeline in Virginia, seeks to address these critical shortages in Virginia's health care workforce by evaluating collective impact partnership models in Career and Technical Education (CTE) for educators and health care providers.

Researchers develop a new way to create a spectrum of natural-looking hair colors
Northwestern University researchers have developed a new way to create a spectrum of natural-looking hair colors, ranging from blond to black, by using enzymes to catalyze synthetic melanin.

Compression garments reduce strength loss after training
Regular training enhances your strength, but recovery is equally important.

Parasitology - Bringing the locals onboard
A new study examines local perceptions of Chagas disease in a region where the infectious agent is endemic.

Skilled surgeons boost colon cancer survival by 70%
Patients of more technically skilled surgeons, as assessed by review of operative video, have better long-term survival after surgery for the treatment of colon cancer, reports a new study.

COVID-19 test result turnaround time for residents, staff in US nursing homes
This study used the Medicare COVID-19 Nursing Home Database, a federally mandated weekly survey of all Medicare-certified skilled nursing facilities, to examine facility-reported test result turnaround time.

Coronavirus mutation may have made it more contagious
A study involving more than 5,000 COVID-19 patients in Houston finds that the virus that causes the disease is accumulating genetic mutations, one of which may have made it more contagious.

Future lake food webs in subarctic have more biomass and contain more omega-3 fatty acids
Subarctic regions are facing rapid changes in climate and land-use intensity.

AI teachers must be effective and communicate well to be accepted, new study finds
The increase in online education has allowed a new type of teacher to emerge -- an artificial one.

Washing hands and Halloween candy can mitigate COVID-19 contamination risks
New research shows that COVID-19 exposure risk from contaminated candy could be successfully mitigated both by washing hands and washing candy using a simple at-home method.

Living near green space linked to lower rates of smoking and higher chances of quitting
A study led by the University of Plymouth showed people living in areas with a high proportion of greenspace were 20% less likely to be current smokers than those in less green areas, and up to 12% more likely to have successfully quit smoking.

Beetroot peptide as potential drug candidate for treating diseases
In a recent study, a research group led by Christian Gruber at MedUni Vienna's Institute of Pharmacology isolated a peptide (small protein molecule) from beetroot.

Bacilli and their enzymes show prospects for several applications
This publication is devoted to the des­cription of different microbial enzymes with prospects for practical application.

Experts see substantial danger to democratic stability around 2020 election
The latest Bright Line Watch survey finds substantial risks to the legitimacy of the election, including potential problems in the casting and counting of votes, the Electoral College, and in the resolution of electoral disputes.

Denisovan DNA found in sediments of Baishiya Karst Cave on Tibetan Plateau
A joint research team from China, Germany and Australia has now reported their findings of Denisovan DNA from sediments of the Baishiya Karst Cave (BKC) on the Tibetan Plateau where the Xiahe mandible was found.

Microbes in the gut could be protective against hazardous radiation exposure
A study by scientists at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and colleagues showed that mice exposed to potentially lethal levels of total body radiation were protected from radiation damage if they had specific types of bacteria in their gut.

Radical changes in ecosystems
Earth and all the living organisms on it are constantly changing.

Laboratory findings associated with severe illness, mortality among hospitalized patients with COVID
This observational study examined how well sociodemographic features, laboratory value and comorbidities of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in Eastern Massachusetts might predict a course of severe illness.

Plankton turn hunters to survive dinosaur-killing asteroid impact
New research by an international team of scientists shows how marine organisms were forced to 'reboot' to survive following the asteroid impact 66 million years ago which killed three quarters of life on earth.

Smart tablecloth can find fruit and help with watering the plants
This interactive fabric can identify items and find lost valuables.

New drug candidate for the treatment of COVID-19
Researchers from the University of Kent, the Goethe-University in Frankfurt am Main (Germany), and the Hannover Medical School (Germany) have identified a drug with the potential to provide a treatment for COVID-19.

Breakthrough nano-particle technology provides fresh solution for smelly feet
New research (1) presented at the 29th EADV Congress, EADV Virtual, shows that socks coated in zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) can prevent bromodosis (foot odour) and pitted keratolysis (bacterial infection causing smelly feet).

Minimally invasive Ellipsys system creates fused, permanent vascular access for dialysis
A new case report published in the Journal of Vascular Surgery provides one of the first known opportunities to directly visualize the permanent and fused connection (anastomosis) that is created with the minimally invasive Ellipsys® Vascular Access System.

Novel adoptive cell transfer method shortens timeline for T-cell manufacture
MUSC Hollings Cancer Center researchers find a new way to generate T-cells faster, making immediate treatment with this therapy possible.

Malaria parasites adapt to survive the dry season, research shows
The main parasite that causes malaria can alter its gene expression to survive undetected in the human blood stream, new research has shown.

Decaying jellyfish blooms can cause temporary changes to water column food webs
Decaying jellyfish blooms fuel the rapid growth of just a few specific strains of seawater bacteria, causing temporary changes to the water column food web.

Can glucose-lowering drugs impact mortality in COVID-19 patients with type 2 diabetes?
Peer reviews of a new study examining the relationship between Type 2 Diabetes and COVID-19 say the research is reliable and relevant, but also call for further investigation of this vital topic.

Trial targets deadly lung cancer
With more than 650 Australians diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma last year, Flinders University is leading new research to discover alternatives to chemotherapy and even prevent deaths by early detection in future.

SARS-CoV-2 might attack red marrow and block new erythrocytes formation
Specialists from the Department of Fundamental Medicine of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with Russian and Japanese colleagues have probed into mechanisms of COVID-19 inside-the-body distribution linked to erythrocytes damaging.

Diet quality, survival among individuals with metastatic colorectal cancer
Whether quality of diet was associated with overall survival among patients beginning treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer was examined in this study.

RUDN University chemist developed green method for malaria and leprosy drug production
A chemist from RUDN University suggested an eco-friendly method for the synthesis of dapsone, a substance that inhibits the growth of malaria and leprosy agents.

Evolution of consumption: A psychological ownership framework
Technological innovations are rapidly changing how we consume goods and services.

Hospital floors are hotspot for bacteria, creating route of transfer to patients
The floors of hospital rooms are frequently contaminated with antibiotic-resistant bacteria within hours of patient admission, creating a route of transfer of potentially dangerous organisms to patients, according to a study published today as part of the proceedings from Decennial 2020: The Sixth International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections.

Infection by confection: COVID-19 and the risk of trick-or-treating
Researchers determined that COVID-19 transmission risk via Halloween candies is low, even when they are handled by infected people, but handwashing and disinfecting collected sweets reduces risk even further.

Melding biology and physical sciences yields deeper understanding of cancer
An evolving understanding of cancer that incorporates the physical properties of tumors and their surrounding tissues into existing biologic and genetic models can direct cancer researchers down previously uncharted avenues, potentially leading to new drugs and new treatment strategies, say investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School (HMS) and the Ludwig Center at HMS.

New cause of inflammation in people with HIV identified
A new study led by researchers at Boston Medical Center examined what factors could be contributing to this inflammation, and they identified the inability to control HIV RNA production from existing HIV DNA as a potential key driver of inflammation.
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