Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 05, 2020
Tokyo's voluntary standstill may have stopped COVID-19 in its tracks
Research shows that Japan's noncompulsory state of emergency generally succeeded in reducing human movement.

Rapid changes in biomarker of inflammation may be a key predictor of COVID-19 outcomes
Brigham and Women's Hospital researchers analyzed patients' levels of inflammation, known to be associated with severity of illness, by looking at C-reactive protein (CRP) trends in 100 COVID-19 patients admitted to the hospital.

Eco-engineered tiles enhance marine biodiversity on seawalls in Hong Kong and beyond
A joint-study led by a team of marine ecologists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has found that the eco-engineered tiles can increase habitat complexity on seawalls in Hong Kong, thereby effectively enhancing the marine biodiversity.

Know when to unfold 'em: Applying particle physics methods to quantum computing
Borrowing a page from high-energy physics and astronomy textbooks, a team of physicists and computer scientists at Berkeley Lab has successfully adapted and applied a common error-reduction technique to the field of quantum computing.

Serial screening for COVID-19 in asymptomatic patients receiving anticancer therapy
The implementation of swab screening program for COVID-19 cancer patients prior to each cycle of anticancer therapy at a hospital in the United Arab Emirates was assessed in this study.

Metal pollution in British waters may be threatening scallops, study reveals
Research, led by an interdisciplinary team at the University of York, suggests that the contamination of Isle of Man seabed sediments with zinc, lead and copper from the mining of these metals, which peaked on the island in the late 19th century, is causing the shells of king scallops to become significantly more brittle

Boosting treatments for metastatic melanoma
University of Cincinnati clinician-scientist Soma Sengupta, MD, PhD, says that new findings from her and Daniel Pomeranz Krummel's, PhD, team might have identified a treatment-boosting drug to enhance effectiveness of therapies for metastatic cancer and make them less toxic, giving patients a fighting chance at survival and improved quality of life.

Parents, MDs agree: genome sequencing as first-tier diagnostic benefits infants in ICU
A vast majority of doctors and parents of babies in intensive care, with diseases of unknown origin, believe genomic sequencing is beneficial in managing care, according to two new papers published by Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine.

Blue phosphorus: How a semiconductor becomes a metal
Blue phosphorus, an atomically thin synthetic semiconductor, becomes metallic as soon as it is converted into a double layer.

Technique to regenerate optic nerve offers hope for future glaucoma treatment
Scientists have used gene therapy to regenerate damaged nerve fibres in the eye, in a discovery that could aid the development of new treatments for glaucoma, one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide.

Natural enemy of Asian fruit fly - previously thought to be one species - is in fact two
CABI scientists have led new research which reveals strong evidence that a natural enemy of the prolific Asian fruit fly Drosphila suzukii - previously believed to be one species - is in fact two with only one of the parasitoid proving suitable as a biological control agent against the pest.

Llama nanobodies could be a powerful weapon against COVID-19
Today in Science, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine describe a new method to extract tiny but extremely powerful SARS-CoV-2 antibody fragments from llamas, which could be fashioned into inhalable therapeutics with the potential to prevent and treat COVID-19.

Ecological "big-data" reveals insights into a changing arctic
The Arctic Animal Movement Archive (AAMA) - a new ecological dataset, which combines three decades of animal tracking studies from across the Arctic - provides a powerful new ecological tool to understand the rapidly changing region better.

Water striders learn from experience how to jump up safely from water surface
Water striders jump upwards from the water surface without breaking it.

Brain magnetic stimulation for veterans with concussion: Need is high, but evidence is limited
Studies using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a noninvasive technique, to help veterans and active-duty service members living with depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and other lasting consequences of concussion have shown promise.

New genus of chimaerid fish classified with help from Kazan University expert
A dental plate was found by Canadian national Stephen Suntok on the Pacific coast of British Columbia.

Clay subsoil at Earth's driest place may signal life on Mars
Diverse microbes discovered in the clay-rich, shallow soil layers in Chile's dry Atacama Desert suggest that similar deposits below the Martian surface may contain microorganisms, which could be easily found by future rover missions or landing craft.

Prejudice, poverty, gender - illustrations show the reality of living with disease
Illustrations by a local artist in Nigeria have helped highlight the prejudice, barriers and stigma experienced by people living with diseases.

Better health - for people and the planet - grows on trees
Tropical fruit trees can improve health, reduce hunger, boost incomes and fight climate change.

The ebb and flow of brain ventricles
Enlarged ventricles in the brains of people with multiple sclerosis were previously considered a sign of tissue loss.

Analysis reveals high burden of musculoskeletal disorders across the globe
Musculoskeletal disorders--which affect muscles, tendons, ligaments, bones, and joints--can severely affect individuals' physical and mental health, and they're especially prevalent among aging adults.

?NTU scientists develop energy-saving 'liquid window'
Scientists at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a liquid window panel that can simultaneously block the sun to regulate solar transmission, while trapping thermal heat that can be released through the day and night, helping to reduce energy consumption in buildings.

Reducing global food system emissions key to meeting climate goals
Reducing fossil fuel use is essential to stopping climate change, but that goal will remain out of reach unless global agriculture and eating habits are also transformed.

When new males take over, these female primates hurry up and mature
Most mammals--including humans and other primates--reach sexual maturity early or late depending on lots of different factors, such as how much food there is to eat.

RUDN University physicist developed software solution to measure the black holes stability
Even if a black hole can be described with a mathematical model, it doesn't mean it exists in reality.

Past is key to predicting future climate, scientists say
In a review paper published in the journal Science, a group of climate experts make the case for including paleoclimate data in the development of climate models.

Archive of animal migration in the Arctic
A global archive with movement data collected across three decades logs changes in the behaviour of Arctic animals

HKUST scientists make breakthrough discovery of new therapeutic targets for Alzheimer's
An HKUST team have identified several new potential molecular targets in endothelial cells and microglia for AD drug development.

After election: making the endangered species act more effective
Following the presidential election, a leading group of scientists are making the case that a 'rule reversal' will not be sufficient to allow the Endangered Species Act to do its job.

Virus that causes COVID-19 puts a plug in cellular defenses
One of the novel coronavirus' most insidious tricks is that it can block the ability of cells to produce protective proteins without hindering its own ability to replicate.

Smokers switching exclusively to glo significantly reduce exposure to certain toxicants
New study finds that smokers switching exclusively to glo significantly reduce their exposure to certain toxicants, potentially reducing risk of smoking-related disease

Conflicts in kindergarten can reduce children's interest in reading and math
Teacher-perceived conflict predicts lower interest and pre-academic skills in math and literacy among kindergarteners, a new study from Finland shows.

Resensitizing 'last-resort' antibiotics for treatment of infections
A research team led by Professor Hongzhe SUN, Chair Professor from the Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, in collaboration with Dr Pak-Leung HO, Director of the HKU Carol Yu Centre for Infection from the Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong (HKU) discovers that by repurposing an antirheumatic gold drug, auranofin (AUR), 'last-resort' antibiotics can be resensitized for treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant superbugs including bloodstream infections, pneumonia and wound infections.

New study shows that football fixture pile-ups are forcing layers and coaches to change
Footballers may be fitter than ever before but congested fixture lists are forcing players to pace themselves while team managers are forced to increasingly juggle their resources, according to new research on elite level men's football by a University of Huddersfield academic.

Earliest example of a rapid-fire tongue found in 'weird and wonderful' extinct amphibians
Fossils of bizarre, armored amphibians known as albanerpetontids provide the oldest evidence of a slingshot-style tongue, a new Science study shows.

New research on imposter stars may improve astronomical data
Quick flashes of light reflecting from satellites and debris in Earth's orbit are extremely common, according to new findings from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill that may improve the accuracy of astronomical data.

Urban air pollution estimates may overshadow full picture for China
For the first time, researchers have compared air pollution in urban and suburban areas across all of China.

Poor nutrition in school years may have created 20 cm height gap across nations
A new global analysis led by Imperial College London, and published in journal The Lancet, has assessed the height and weight of school-aged children and adolescents across the world.

Blocking energy pathway reduces GVHD while retaining anti-cancer effects of T-cells
MUSC Hollings Cancer Center researchers identified that blocking an alternative energy pathway for T-cells after hematopoietic stem cell transplant helps reduce graft-versus-host disease in an animal model of leukemia.

SARS-CoV-2 uses 'genome origami' to infect and replicate inside host cells
Scientists at the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with Justus-Liebig University, Germany, have uncovered how the genome of SARS-CoV-2 - the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 - uses genome origami to infect and replicate successfully inside host cells.

COVID-19 is making tinnitus worse -- new study
New research reveals that tinnitus, a common condition that causes the perception of noise in the ear and head, is being exacerbated by COVID-19.

New technology allows cameras to capture colors invisible to the human eye
New research from Tel Aviv University will allow cameras to recognize colors that the human eye and even ordinary cameras are unable to perceive.

Researchers use genomics to reconstitute yellow fever outbreak in São Paulo
Three waves of the disease swept the state between 2016 and 2018.

Antiangiogenic therapy can cause malignancy in kidney cancers
In some cases, this type of therapy increases the invasiveness and metastasis of kidney tumors.

USask researchers find face masks don't hinder breathing during exercise
A new University of Saskatchewan (USask) study has found that exercise performance and blood and muscle oxygen levels are not affected for healthy individuals wearing a face mask during strenuous workouts.

Nanobodies that neutralize SARS-CoV-2
Two separate studies have identified nanobodies - which could be produced less expensively than monoclonal antibodies - that bind tightly to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and efficiently neutralize SARS-CoV-2 in cells.

Shifts in water temperatures affect eating habits of larval tuna at critical life stage
Small shifts in ocean temperature can have significant effects on the eating habits of blackfin tuna during the larval stage of development, when finding food and growing quickly are critical to long-term survival.

Host genetic factors shape composition of virus communities
Plants can be infected by multiple viruses at once. However, the composition of the pathogen community varies, even if individuals belong to the same species and the same population.

How parental involvement affects children's performance in school
Using data from the HSE University longitudinal study Trajectories in Education and Careers (TrEC), Ilya Prakhov, Olga Kotomina and Alexandra Sazhina determined which forms of family engagement in the school are useful and which are harmful to the student.

Study suggests most humans are vulnerable to type 2 diabetes
Scientists have found that insulin has met an evolutionary cul-de-sac, limiting its ability to adapt to obesity and thereby rendering most people vulnerable to Type 2 diabetes.

Physical activity and dietary counselling slows down development of insulin resistance in children
A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that individualised and family-based physical activity and dietary counselling considerably slows down the development of insulin resistance, which is a precursor of type 2 diabetes, in 6-9-year-old children.

Medicaid expansion linked to lower mortality rates for three major types of cancer
In states that have expanded Medicaid availability as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), mortality rates for three major forms of cancer are significantly lower than in states that have not expanded their Medicaid, a new study by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard University shows

NIH researchers identify gene in mice that controls food cravings, desire to exercise
National Institutes of Health researchers have discovered a gene in mice that controls the craving for fatty and sugary foods and the desire to exercise.

Mystery molecule in bacteria is revealed to be a guard
Unusual structures in bacterial cells keep viral infection from spreading; a list of new ones could provide improved biotech tools.

Population dynamics and the rise of empires in Inner Asia
In a new study published in Cell, researchers seek to understand the genetic, sociopolitical and cultural changes surrounding the formation of the eastern Eurasian Steppe's historic empires.

Surprising insights into the role of autophagy in neuron
Autophagy protects our neurons in the brain, but for entirely different reasons than previously assumed, as researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) and Charité in Berlin have shown.

Ecologically friendly agriculture doesn't compromise crop yields
Research published in Science Advances--based on an analysis of 5,188 studies comparing diversified and simplified agricultural practices--indicates crop yield was maintained or even increased under diversified practices.

Changes in cancer survival after Medicaid expansion
Researchers compared the rate of death for patients diagnosed with breast, colorectal or lung cancer and living in states that expanded Medicaid under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act with states that didn't.

The biggest trees capture the most carbon: Large trees dominate carbon storage in forests
A recent study examining carbon storage in Pacific Northwest forests demonstrated that although large-diameter trees (21 inches) only comprised 3% of total stems, they accounted for 42% of the total aboveground carbon storage.

COVID-19: Enzyme targeted by virus also influences gut inflammation
An enzyme that helps COVID-19 (coronavirus) infect the body also plays a role in inflammation and patient outcomes in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a new study led by Cedars-Sinai.

Large-scale cancer proteomics study profiles protein changes in response to drug treatments
Through large-scale profiling of protein changes in response to drug treatments in cancer cell lines, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have generated a valuable resource to aid in predicting drug sensitivity, to understand therapeutic resistance mechanisms and to identify optimal combination treatment strategies.

Why big-box chains' embrace of in-store click-and collect leaves money on the table
Shoppers' different needs for convenience benefits mean that using click-and-collect types results in vastly different performance outcomes.

Shining a light on the issue of wine fraud
University of Adelaide wine researchers are developing a fast and simple method of authenticating wine - a potential solution against the estimated billions of dollars' worth of wine fraud globally, but also offering a possible means of building regional branding.

Utilizing a 'krafty' waste product: Toward enhancing vehicle fuel economy
Researchers from Kanazawa University have chemically modified Kraft lignin -- ordinarily considered in the paper industry to be a waste product -- and used it to produce quality carbon fiber.

New database shows Arctic animals' changing behavior in face of climate change
Three decades of data on animal migration and movements in the Arctic, tracked through a massive database developed by environmental engineers, shows that animals in one of Earth's coldest regions are shifting their behaviors because of climate change.

LipiDiDiet finds broadly sustainable effects of nutrient intervention in early Alzheimer's
There is no known cure for dementia at the present time and existing drug therapies have to focus on treating the symptoms of the disease.

Hospitalizations for drug use-related eye infections in US
Changes in rates and risk factors over more than a decade in the US for hospitalizations for a vision-threatening eye infection related to intravenous (IV) drug use were investigated in this study.

Children produce different antibodies in response to SARS-CoV-2
Compared with adults, children produce a very different antibody response after infection with the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, suggesting they clear the virus easily.

Health care use drops during pandemic; switch to telemedicine creates disparities
One of the first studies to quantify the cuts in elective medical care experienced in March and April found that the number of mammograms and colonoscopies dropped by more than 65% during the period.

The burning question of Bonfire Night pollution
Bonfire Night celebrations contaminate our air with 100 times more soot than usual.

Biological clock and extra gene pairs control important plant functions
New understanding of circadian rhythms could be key to stronger, drought-resistant crops in the face of climate change.

Core value of the Chengjian fauna: evolution of animals and birth of basic human organs
The Chengjiang lagerstatte is an extraordinarily diverse fossil site in Yunnan Province, China.

Forthcoming COVID-19 preprints to be peer reviewed in Rapid Reviews
Forthcoming COVID-19 research in Rapid Reviews include manuscripts examining the risk of infection in commercial aircraft, classrooms, sporting events; a preprint that concludes universal mask mandates could save 815K lives; and studies of race/socioeconomics and mortality.

NYCHA secondhand smoke policy needs more time and effort to show how well it works
One year into a smoking ban in buildings run by the nation's largest public housing authority, tenant exposure to secondhand smoke in hallways, stairwells, and apartments has not declined, a new study shows.

Large-area flexible organic photodiodes can compete with silicon devices
The performance of flexible large-area organic photodiodes has advanced to the point that they can now offer advantages over conventional silicon photodiode technology, particularly for applications such as biomedical imaging and biometric monitoring that require detecting low levels of light across large areas.

Researchers study strength-training gender gap, possible solutions
Strength training is an important part of any exercise routine, but some women may not be getting the recommended hours.

Global food system emissions threaten achievement of climate change targets
Even if greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel use in the global food system were immediately halted, the remaining greenhouse gasses otherwise produced from global food production would make meeting the Paris Agreement's target of limiting temperature increases to 1.5° Celsius (C) above preindustrial levels very difficult, a new study reports.

Trehalose 6-phosphate promotes seed filling by activating auxin biosynthesis
Plants undergo several developmental transitions during their life cycle. The differentiation of the young embryo from a meristem like structure into a highly specialized storage organ, is believed to be controlled by local connections between sugars and hormonal response systems.

Stable protein decoy neutralized SARS-CoV-2 in cells and protected hamsters from viral challenge
Researchers have designed a protein 'decoy' that mimics the interface where the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein binds a human cell, one version of which could neutralize virus infection in cells and protect hamsters from viral challenge.

Immunotherapy may work better in stomach cancer when combined with chemo, given earlier
Immunotherapy, often ineffective against stomach cancer, was more effective when combined with chemotherapy and given earlier, finds a new study in mice.

Keeping our cool
Fossil fuel burning accounts for the majority of global greenhouse gas emissions, and to the world's credit, several countries are working to reduce their use and the heat-trapping emissions that ensue.

A species identified in 2016 as an ancient form of chameleon was misidentified at that time, say researchers
A species identified in 2016 as an ancient form of chameleon was misidentified at that time, say researchers, many of whom were part of the original 2016 report.

Astronomers discover clues that unveil the mystery of fast radio bursts
UNLV astrophysicist Bing Zhang and international collaborators recently observed fast radio bursts, powerful radio waves coming from deep space that have been among the most mysterious astronomical phenomena ever observed.

Pay people to get COVID-19 jab to ensure widespread coverage, says leading ethicist
Governments should consider incentivising people to get a COVID-19 jab, when the vaccine becomes available, to achieve the required level of herd immunity--which could be up to 80%+ of the population--and stamp out the infection, argues a leading ethicist in an opinion piece accepted for publication in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

Light pollution at night severely disrupts the reproductive cycle of corals
Studying the reproductive cycle of two coral species from the Indo-Pacific Ocean over the course of three months, researchers found that light pollution caused delayed gametogenesis and unsynchronized gamete release.

Changes in health services use among commercially insured US populations during COVID-19 pandemic
Researchers examined whether the first two months of the COVID-19 pandemic were associated with changes in non-COVID health care use among a large population of individuals with employer-sponsored insurance, specifically preventive services (e.g., pediatric vaccinations), elective services (e.g., orthopedic surgery) and nonelective services (e.g., labor and delivery care) in March and April 2020 compared with the same months in 2018 and 2019.

Artificial Intelligence has learned to estimate oil viscosity
A group of Skoltech scientists developed machine learning (ML) algorithms that can teach artificial intelligence (AI) to determine oil viscosity based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data.

Story tips: Ice breaker data, bacterial breakdown, catching heat and finding order
ORNL story tips: Ice breaker data, bacterial breakdown, catching heat and finding order

Nervous systems of insects inspire efficient future AI systems
Study explores functions of fruit fly's nervous system in food seeking / results valuable for the development and control of artificial intelligence.

Using machine learning to track the pandemic's impact on mental health
Researchers have found an increase in anxiety and in thoughts about suicide in response to Covid-19 after analyzing Reddit posts.

Global-scale animal ecology reveals behavioral changes in response to climate change
An international team including University of Maryland biologists developed a data archive of animal movement studies from across the global Arctic and sub-Arctic and conducted three case studies that revealed surprising patterns and associations between climate change and the behavior of golden eagles, bears, caribou, moose and wolves.

For quick COVID-19 testing, iSCAN can
A new test kit could enable quick and effective COVID-19 tests for people arriving at airports.

Blood cell mutations confound prostate cancer liquid biopsy results
Unrelated mutations, when present in the blood, can give false positive results in men with advanced prostate cancer undergoing liquid biopsies.

Researchers urge healthcare providers to routinely ask patients about cannabis use
Healthcare providers should talk to patients about their cannabis use the same way they talk about other habits like smoking and drinking: routinely and without judgment.

Next-generation computer chip with two heads
EPFL engineers have developed a computer chip that combines two functions - logic operations and data storage - into a single architecture, paving the way to more efficient devices.

Disparities in uptake of telemedicine during COVID-19 surge in multidisciplinary head, neck cancer population
The association between patient demographic characteristics and socioeconomic status and engagement in telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic is examined in this observational study.

COVID-19 linked to worse stroke outcomes
People who experience strokes while infected with COVID-19 appear to be left with greater disability after the stroke, according a study led by UCL and UCLH researchers.

Soil carbon changes in transition areas suggest conservation for Amazon, scientists say
Conservation efforts on the edges of the Amazon forest, especially in light of recent deforestation by human disturbance, could help the region weather the storm of climate change, researchers say.

ACA results in fewer low-income uninsured, but non-urgent ER visits haven't changed
Since the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) Medicaid expansion program went into effect 10 years ago, the U.S. has seen a larger reduction in the number of uninsured low-income, rural residents, compared to their urban contemporaries.

Scientists work to shed light on Standard Model of particle physics
In a collaborative project with Fermilab, Argonne scientists mapped the magnetic field inside a vacuum with unprecedented accuracy.

The first duckbill dinosaur fossil from Africa hints at how dinosaurs once crossed oceans
The first fossils of a duckbilled dinosaur have been discovered in Africa, suggesting dinosaurs crossed hundreds of kilometres of open water to get there.

Minor fluctuations in sound make it hard to identify in which concert hall music is played
The volume and timbre of music have a significant impact on how people perceive the acoustics in a concert hall, according to two recent studies carried out by the research group of Aalto University Professor Tapio Lokki.

From hard to soft: making sponges from mussel shells
Scientists have discovered a spongy form of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), a material found in limestone, chalk, marble, and the shells of mussels and other shellfish.

Learning disorders and Parkinson's disease: tremor predicts effects of medication
The effect of dopaminergic medication on the learning abilities of patients with Parkinson's disease turns out to be linked to the presence of tremor symptoms.

Research reveals infertile spikelets contribute to yield in sorghum and related grasses
A team of scientists at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, in laboratories led by Elizabeth (Toby) Kellogg PhD, member and Robert E.

Scientists define binary tropical cyclones
A new research established an objective standard for defining binary tropical cyclones.

How does the brain process fear?
CSHL Professor Bo Li's team explores the brain circuits that underlie fear.

Sugar-coated viral proteins hijack and hitch a ride out of cells
Many viruses - including coronaviruses ¬- have protective outer layer made of proteins, fats and sugars.

Researchers shrink imaging spectrometer without compromising performance
Researchers have developed a new imaging spectrometer that is much lighter and smaller than state-of-the-art instruments while maintaining the same high level of performance.

Corn and other crops are not adapted to benefit from elevated carbon dioxide levels
Although rising carbon dioxide levels can boost plant growth, a new review from the University of Illinois shows that some crops, including corn, are adapted to a pre-industrial environment and cannot distribute their resources effectively to take advantage of extra CO2.

Graz researchers identify biomarker for cardiovascular diseases
The role of the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 3 in the blood pressure-regulating renin-angiotensin system was investigated in the inter-university cooperation project BioTechMed-Graz.

Improving the Endangered Species Act requires more than rule reversal
Although species are disappearing at an alarming rate worldwide, the Trump administration recently finalized a series of substantial changes to the regulations that underpin the U.S.

Down Syndrome-associated gene suppresses age-related corneal clouding
Down syndrome and hypercholesterolemia mouse models suggest that the DSCR-1 gene protects against abnormal cornea vascularization and associated blindness by suppressing oxidized LDL cholesterol production and downstream angiogenic signaling during chronic high cholesterol.

Precision chemo-immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer?
Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal: according to the National Cancer Institute, only about 10 percent of patients remain alive five years after diagnosis.

Species more likely to die out with rapid climate changes
The great tit and other birds can adapt to changes in their food supply as a result of climate change, but they run into trouble if the changes happen too quickly.

Trends in positive BRCA test results among older women
National health record data were used to examine whether the rate of positive tests for variants of the BRCA gene that increase the risk for certain cancers changed among older women in the United States between 2008 and 2018.

Crystals reveal the danger of sleeping volcanoes
Most active volcanoes on Earth are dormant and are normally not considered hazardous.

De novo protein decoys block COVID-19 infection in vitro and protect animals in vivo
Publication in Science by Neoleukin Therapeutics of research describing novel molecules designed to treat or prevent infection by the virus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2.

Subarachnoid hemorrhage causes more deaths among middle-aged women than other strokes
According to a recently published Finnish study, subarachnoid hemorrhage, which has so far been considered a relatively rare type of stroke, causes a significant share of all fatalities among middle-aged people.

Human intelligence just got less mysterious says Leicester neuroscientist
NEUROSCIENCE EXPERTS from the University of Leicester have released research that breaks with the past fifty years of neuroscientific opinion, arguing that the way we store memories is key to making human intelligence superior to that of animals.

Costs to informal carers for people in the last three months of life are larger than those to formal
Findings from an international study into the costs and outcomes of informal end of life care have today been published BMC Medicine.

Two motivational artificial beings are better than one for enhancing learning
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that offline consolidation of a motor task was enhanced by praise delivered by robots, whether they were presented on a screen or were physically present.

Asian ethnicity strongly linked to COVID-related stroke
Asian ethnicity is strongly linked to COVID-related stroke, reveals an analysis of stroke centre activity in England and Scotland during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic, and accepted for publication in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

Cockroach mating habits and developmental features help uncover insect evolution
A research team led by the University of Tsukuba examined the mating habits of an often-overlooked cockroach family, Nocticolidae, to provide clues about insect evolution.
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