Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 09, 2020
New study reveals disturbing surge in violent injuries during stay-at-home orders
The social isolation brought on by stay-at-home orders (SAHO) issued in the early phase of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may have a deadly and dangerous side effect: an increase in intentional penetrating injuries, especially firearm violence, that has remained at high levels even as stay-at-home orders have subsided and as COVID-19 cases are on an upswing.

New research supports clinical utility of CTC count for metastatic breast cancer
Menarini Silicon Biosystems, the pioneer of liquid biopsy technology, today announced the publication of a research study providing support for the reliability of using circulating tumor cell (CTC) count to guide frontline therapy choice for patients with estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), HER2-negative (HER2) metastatic breast cancer.

New cancer drugs saved over 1.2 million people in the US over 16 years, new study shows
More than 1.2 million people in the US prevented facing death following a cancer diagnosis, between the year 2000 and 2016, thanks to ever improving treatment options -- a large new national study shows.

Severe COVID-19 infection rare in newborns
Severe COVID-19 infection appears rare in newborn babies, suggests a new study.

More economic worries mean less caution about COVID-19
Workers experiencing job and financial insecurity are less likely to follow the CDC's guidelines for COVID-19, such as physical distancing, limiting trips from home and washing hands, according to a Washington State University study.

COVID-19 risks: Irregular heartbeat may increase risk, blood pressure medicines do not
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to affect people around the globe, research is ongoing to facilitate a greater understanding of the virus to improve patient care and outcomes.

Extra precautions during CPR due to the pandemic do not have a negative impact on survival
A U.S. medical center compared outcomes of patients in 2019 and 2020 who had in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to determine if safety precautions due to the pandemic affect patient survival.

Scientists unravel how and why Amazon trees die
The capacity of the Amazon forest to store carbon in a changing climate will ultimately be determined by how fast trees die - and what kills them.

NYUAD researchers develop protocol for a more accurate COVID-19 testing technique
Researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi's Biology Program and Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (CGSB) have implemented a new three-step testing approach that promises to significantly - and cost-effectively -- improve testing accuracy.

Machine learning helps predict survival rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Machine learning predictions about the survival rate of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were more accurate when neighborhood-level factors were added to the data analysis.

How ancient dust from the sea floor helps to explain climate history
Iron-containing dust can fuel ocean productivity. Researchers now show that dust travelled a long way in the South Pacific Region during the last Ice Age.

COVID-19 triggers OCD in children and young people
Many children and young people with obsessive thoughts and compulsions experience that their OCD, anxiety and depressive symptoms worsen during a crisis such as COVID-19.

Calories by the clock? Squeezing most of your calories in early doesn't impact weight loss
Time-restricted eating, which restricts eating to specific hours of the day, did not impact weight among overweight adults with prediabetes or diabetes.

Marijuana use associated with complications after heart attack or procedures
Two separate studies find dangerous complications following heart procedures for marijuana users.

More green spaces can help boost air quality, reduce heart disease deaths
The number of trees, shrubs and grasses in an area - known as green space or greenness - can improve air quality, counteract air pollution and may reduce heart disease deaths.

Penn Medicine researchers find link between food insecurity and cardiovascular death risk
According to preliminary research conducted by researchers at Penn Medicine, increasing rates of food insecurity in counties across the United States are independently associated with an increase in cardiovascular death rates among adults between the ages of 20 and 64.

People who eat chili pepper may live longer?
Consumption of chili pepper may reduce the relative risk of cardiovascular disease mortality by 26%, according to an analysis of diet and mortality data from four large, international studies.

How to accelerate solar adoption for the underserved
Berkeley Lab researchers examined if certain policy and business models could improve solar panel adoption equity in terms of household income.

Prescriptions of antipsychotic medications in young children is declining
The use of antipsychotics in young children is declining but doctors continue to prescribe these medications off-label for conditions not approved by the Food and Drug Administration and without the recommended psychiatric consultation, a Rutgers study found.

Low risk of cancer spread on active surveillance for early prostate cancer
Men undergoing active surveillance for prostate cancer have very low rates - one percent or less - of cancer spread (metastases) or death from prostate cancer, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Urology®, an Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA).

Black patients less likely to receive added, higher dose meds to control blood pressure
Racial inequities in treatment intensification - prescribing a new medication for hypertension or increasing the dose for existing medication - may be responsible for nearly one-third of racial disparities in treating the condition.

Serious disparities in care and outcomes found among Black and non-white heart patients
Adults who are Black or from other underrepresented racial/ethnic groups received up to 10% fewer early treatments for heart problems compared to white patients.

Coating plastics by porous nanofilm
A research team has developed a new method for creating metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films that can be applied to sensors and electric devices.

Study confirms spit testing may help doctors diagnose concussions
Doctors may soon be able to more accurately diagnose concussions by measuring the number of certain molecules in a person's saliva, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

Cutting emissions makes North Atlantic focus of ocean heat uptake under global warming
Scientists discover an obvious hemispheric asymmetry in Ocean Heat Undertake (OHU) under the low-emission scenario.

COVID Misinformation a Roadblock to Curbing Pandemic
Two new studies suggest that the spread of misinformation about COVID-19 will make it harder for communities to bring the pandemic under control. stereotypes and fears of stigma may be barriers to COVID testing, a finding that confirms previous studies about stigma around HIV and Ebola.

Half a billion years old microfossils may yield new knowledge of animal origins
When and how did the first animals appear? Science has long sought an answer.

Keep the data coming
A continuous data supply ensures data-intensive simulations can run at maximum speed.

High blood pressure complications in US pregnancies have nearly doubled
Researchers found high blood pressure complicated about 80,000 pregnancies in 2018, nearly twice as many as in 2007.

Children exposed to tobacco smoke at home have worse heart function as adults
The more secondhand tobacco smoke children breathe at home while growing up, the higher their chance of developing markers of decreased heart function as adults.

All weight loss isn't equal for reducing heart failure risk
DALLAS - Nov. 9, 2020 - Reducing the level of body fat and waist size are linked to a lower risk of heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes, a study led by UT Southwestern researchers indicates.

A new model found to predict earthquake propagation speed
In an article published on November 9th in Nature Geoscience, Jean-Paul Ampuero and Huihui Weng, two researchers from Université Côte d'Azur and the French National Research Institute for Sustainable Development (IRD-France) propose a new model to predict the propagation speed of earthquakes.

WFIRM scientists create hybrid tissue construct for cartilage regeneration
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists have developed a method to bioprint a type of cartilage that could someday help restore knee function damaged by arthritis or injury.

Women veterans with PTSD have higher rate of heart disease
Women veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were 44% more likely to develop ischemic heart disease including heart attacks, compared to those without PTSD.

U.S.-born Black women at higher risk of preeclampsia than Black immigrants
Black women born in the United States have a higher risk of developing high blood pressure during pregnancy, a condition known as preeclampsia, compared to Black women who immigrated to the country.

India's clean fuel transition slowed by belief that firewood is better for well-being
India's transition to clean cooking fuels may be hampered by users' belief that using firewood is better for their families' wellbeing than switching to Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), a new study reveals.

Liver scarring relatively common among middle-aged adults
A substantial minority of participants from the Framingham Heart Study, (nearly nine percent), had potentially clinically significant liver fibrosis (scarring).

You drive like a girl: Study shows gender bias in perceptions of ride-sharing performance
While digital brokerages provide a more efficient method for the exchange of goods and services and an improved way for consumers to voice their opinions about the quality of work they receive, bias and discrimination can emerge as part of the review process, according to Notre Dame research.

Home-visiting program shows promise of reducing risk of obesity among Native American children
Lessons on healthy feeding practices delivered to young mothers through a brief home-visiting intervention put Native American infants on a healthier growth trajectory, lowering their risks for obesity.

New discovery may change how dexamethasone is prescribed for some COVID-19 patients
New insights into the way the body distributes dexamethasone could mean that patients with high blood sugar may see diminished effects.

Acute exposure to higher ozone levels linked to higher risk of cardiac arrest
Analysis of data from 187,000 patients found that higher ozone levels were associated with a higher risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

Don't be fooled by pretty food, USC research warns
Consumers confuse pretty food with healthy food, largely due to highly stylized presentations and marketing that appeal to aesthetics and appetite.

Slow-living animal species could be disease 'reservoirs'
Animals that live slowly - breeding less rapidly and living longer - could be ''reservoirs'' of diseases that could jump to new species including humans, new research suggests.

RUDN University soil scientist: Deforestation affects the bacterial composition of the soil
A soil scientist from RUDN University studied the effect of forest conversion on the properties of the soil: its acidity, carbon and nitrogen resources, bacterial composition, and the activity of microorganisms.

Yin and Yang: Two signaling molecules control growth and behavior in bacteria
Bacteria are considered to be true experts in survival. Their rapid adaptive response to changing environmental conditions is based, among other things, on two competing signaling molecules.

People with inflammatory bowel disease still die earlier despite increase in life
A study comparing life expectancy of people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and without found that, while life expectancy increased for both groups, people with IBD generally died sooner.

Newly discovered fossil shows small-scale evolutionary changes in an extinct human species
Males of the extinct human species Paranthropus robustus were thought to be substantially larger than females -- much like the size differences seen in modern-day primates such as gorillas, orangutans and baboons.

Princeton researchers find key to piercing harmful bacteria's armor
Princeton University researchers have identified a new bacterial protein that assists in delivering components to the outer membrane of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, as they report in recent papers in PNAS and Trends in Microbiology.

Many transgender people who receive hormone therapy have unaddressed heart disease risks
Many transgender people who receive gender-affirming hormone therapy have heart disease and stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure and cholesterol, even during young adulthood.

New tool detects unsafe security practices in Android apps
Computer scientists at Columbia Engineering have shown for the first time that it is possible to analyze how thousands of Android apps use cryptography without needing to have the apps' actual codes.

Recommendations for fair and regulated access to a COVID-19 vaccine
The first COVID-19 vaccines could be authorized as early as the start of 2021.

Researchers isolate and decode brain signal patterns for specific behaviors
A standing challenge has been isolating patterns in brain signals that relate to a specific behavior, such as finger movements.

Soldiers benefit from psychological health research
Army scientists developed computer-based training to help Soldiers avoid unnecessary social conflict and mitigate anger-related outcomes.

A biomimetic membrane for desalinating seawater on an industrial scale
Reverse osmosis is one of the most widely used techniques for the desalination of water.

Large, delayed outbreaks of endemic diseases possible following COVID-19 controls
Measures such as mask wearing and social distancing that are key to reducing coronavirus infection have also greatly reduced the incidence of other diseases, such as influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

HSS presents innovative research at 2020 ACR Annual Meeting
At this year's American College of Rheumatology virtual meeting, Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) presented exciting research related to rheumatology and orthopedic surgery.

Formal community forest management policies often lead to reduced access, resource rights
The most comprehensive global analysis of community forestry ever undertaken shows that government policies formalizing local residents' land access and resource rights often backfire by resulting in less access and weakened rights.

Wound-healing biomaterials activate immune system for stronger skin
Researchers at Duke University and the University of California, Los Angeles, have developed a biomaterial that significantly reduces scar formation after a wound, leading to more effective skin healing.

For asymbiotic growth of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, feed them fatty acids
Scientists around the world have been working to grow arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi without their host plants because they can be used as organic fertilizer in agriculture and forestry.

Social distancing is increasing loneliness in older adults
Social distancing introduced in response to COVID-19 is increasing feelings of loneliness in Scotland's older population and impacting their wellbeing, according to a new University of Stirling study.

Trees set sixth-graders up for success
The transition to middle school is undeniably tough for many sixth-graders, even in the best of times.

New method developed by Lithuanian scientists can reach 90% accuracy in detecting melanoma
A team of researchers from Kaunas University of Technology and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences proposed a non-invasive method for detection of melanoma.

A better understanding of coral skeleton growth suggests ways to restore reefs
In a new study, University of Wisconsin-Madison physicists observed reef-forming corals at the nanoscale and identified how they create their skeletons.

New study defines life cycle of a destructive plant pathogen 142 years after its discovery
''Using confocal and electron microscopic imaging, we provide compelling evidence to support the proposed life cycle of P. brassicae, making it more convincing and acceptable to the community,'' explained Liu.

One third of UK fruit and vegetables are imported from climate-vulnerable countries
One third of UK fruit and vegetables are imported from climate-vulnerable countries - and this is on the rise.

Genetic disposition protects immune system from aging
A genetic disposition that plays a role in the development of the heart in the embryo also appears to play a key role in the human immune system.

Researchers examine if online physician reviews indicate clinical outcomes
Dr. Atanu Lahiri and Dr. Zhiqiang Zheng studied the relationship between online reviews of physicians and their patients' actual clinical outcomes.

E-cigarettes can be 'gateway' to cigarettes for teens with no prior intention to smoke
Cigarette smoking remains a leading preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States.

For young athletes, inadequate sleep leads to decreased performance
Most young athletes don't get enough sleep - and that may significantly affect their sports performance, according to a paper in the November issue of Current Sports Medicine Reports, official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).

Young survivors of acute myeloid leukemia have long-term complications from treatment
Adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have a high risk of developing several long-term health complications after treatment, a study led by UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers has found.

Lung symptoms common among users of e-cigarettes and related products
In a 2016 survey, one-third of users of e-cigarettes and related products reported symptoms associated with lung irritation or injury.

A more resistant material against microorganisms is created to restore cultural heritage
The study was performed by a research team at the University Research Institute into Fine Chemistry and Nanochemistry at the University of Cordoba and Seville's Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology of the Spanish National Research Council

Implantable sensor could measure bodily functions -- and then safely biodegrade
Sensors that monitor a patient's condition during and after medical procedures can be expensive, uncomfortable and even dangerous.

Unhealthy dietary habits are associated with the risk of proteinuria onset
Researchers from Kanazawa University found out that unhealthy dietary habits as a risk factor for proteinuria onset which is a key prognostic factor of chronic kidney disease (CKD).

New 'genomic' method reveals atomic arrangements of battery material
Scientists have developed a new way to decipher the atomic-level structure of materials based on data gleaned from ground-up powder samples.

Female mongooses start battles for chance to mate
Female banded mongooses lead their groups into fights then try to mate with enemy males in the chaos of battle, new research shows.

Study examines health literacy and shared decision-making in prostate cancer screening
New research examines the dynamics between men's health literacy, their discussions with their doctors, and their decisions on whether to get tested for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a potential marker of prostate cancer.

Hollow porphyrinic nanospheres
IBS research team developed a template-free, one-pot synthesis of a porphyrin-based gigantic organic cages composed of multi-porphyrin units.

Effect of hydroxychloroquine on clinical status
This randomized trial compares the effects of hydroxychloroquine versus placebo on patients' clinical status at 14 days (home, requiring noninvasive or invasive ventilation or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, hospitalized, died) among adults hospitalized with COVID-19.

Food insecurity linked to higher risk of cardiovascular death
A new, large-scale, national study provides evidence of the link between food insecurity and increased risk of cardiovascular death.

Rapid test shows 'solid performance' for diagnosing infection around joint implants
The recently FDA-authorized alpha-defensin lateral flow test is a highly accurate, ten-minute test for diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) - a serious and costly complication of total joint replacement, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

New medication to treat shock caused by blood or fluid loss found safe and effective
Hypovolemic shock, caused by severe loss of blood or body fluids, can be deadly if not treated promptly.

Infection by parasites disturbs flight behaviour in shoals of fish
Shoal behaviour in fish is an important strategy for them to safeguard their survival.

No matter the size of a nuclear party, some protons and neutrons will pair up and dance
No matter the size of a nuclear party, certain protons and neutrons will always pair up and dance, a new MIT study finds.

Tiny device enables new record in super-fast quantum light detection
Researchers from the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs (QET Labs) and Université Côte d'Azur have made a new miniaturized light detector to measure quantum features of light in more detail than ever before.

Nut consumption causes changes in sperm DNA function
Researchers have evaluated for the first time the effect of a short/middle-term consumption of a mixture of tree nuts (almonds, hazelnuts and walnuts) on sperm DNA methylation patterns in healthy individuals reporting eating a Western-style diet.

Asthmatics working in dusty environments risk a trip to the hospital
Working in farming or the wood industry while suffering from asthma is not a good combination.

Could SARS-CoV-2 evolve resistance to COVID-19 vaccines?
Similar to bacteria evolving resistance to antibiotics, viruses can evolve resistance to vaccines, and the evolution of SARS-CoV-2 could undermine the effectiveness of vaccines that are currently under development, according to a paper published November 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by David Kennedy and Andrew Read from Pennsylvania State University, USA.

New black hole merger simulations could help power next-gen gravitational wave detectors
Rochester Institute of Technology scientists have developed new simulations of black holes with widely varying masses merging that could help power the next generation of gravitational wave detectors.

Loneliness a leading cause of depression in older adults
Loneliness is responsible for 18% of depression among people over 50 in England, according to a new study led by UCL researchers published in The Lancet Psychiatry.

Clinicians who prescribe unnecessary antibiotics fuel future antibiotic use
Receipt of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections makes it more likely that patients and their families will seek care and receive antibiotics for future respiratory viral infections.

Implications of early health care spending reductions for expected spending as COVID-19 pandemic evolves
The effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on health care spending in the U.S. has important implications for payers, clinicians, hospitals, health care systems and patients, and has been the subject of much debate.

Higher fitness levels linked to lower AFib risk in male, African American veterans
Higher fitness levels reduced the risk of developing an irregular heart rhythm, known as atrial fibrillation or AFib, by 30% to 50% in a study of male, African American veterans.

New 'robotic snake' device grips, picks up objects
An invention similar to an elephant's trunk has potential benefits for many industries where handling delicate objects is essential, say the UNSW researchers who developed it.

Association between nursing home crowding, COVID-19 infection, mortality in Ontario, Canada
Researchers examined the association between nursing home crowding and COVID-19 across the entire nursing home system of Ontario, Canada, during the first months of the pandemic.

Putting stock into Twitter: Social media can influence returns, WVU finance professor says
Alexander Kurov, Fred T. Tattersall Research Chair and Professor of Finance in the John Chambers College of Business and Economics, found that firm-level Twitter content has information useful for predicting next-day stock returns, and that it is a stronger predictor of returns for firms with less analyst coverage.

Study finds patients prefer doctors who share their same race/ethnicity
Patients who shared the same racial or ethnic background as their physician were more likely to give the maximum patient rating score, according to a new analysis of 117,589 patient surveys from 2014 to 2017.

Plant inspired: Printing self-folding paper structures for future mechatronics
Natural motion in plants occurs because of cellulose fibers absorbing and releasing water.

Global analysis of forest management shows local communities often lose out
Maintaining forest cover is an important natural climate solution, but new research shows that too often, communities lose out when local forest management is formalised.

Environmental factors affect the distribution of Iberian spiders
Southern small-leaved oak forests are the habitats with a higher level of spider endemism in the Iberian Peninsula, according to an article published in the journal Biodiversity and Conservation.

Healthy habits are key to maintaining health even while taking multiple prescriptions
A healthy diet, regular exercise and not smoking contribute to maintaining overall health regardless of how many medications a person takes.

Why do bats fly into walls?
Bats sometimes collide with large walls even though they detect these walls with their sonar system.

Flu vaccine rate less than 25% in young adults with heart disease, despite increased risk
In 2018, only about 25% of adults between the ages of 18 and 34 with any cardiovascular disease received a flu shot, and in those with a history of a heart attack, only about 20% were vaccinated.

Researchers discover bacterial DNA's recipe for success
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a way of modeling how potentially beneficial packages of DNA called plasmids circulate and accumulate through a complex environment that includes many bacterial species.

Oil-eating worms provide valuable assistance in soil remediation
Bionanotechnology Lab of Kazan Federal University works on adapting nematodes to consuming oil waste.

New insight into a placental gene pathway and its association with vitamin D
Vitamin D status during pregnancy has multifaceted effects on maternal health.

Effect, reach of medical articles posted on preprint servers during COVID-19 pandemic
Researchers compared the effect and reach of studies about therapies for COVID-19 posted on the medRxiv preprint server, subsequent publications in medical journals of some of these studies, and journal articles that were not posted on either medRxiv or another preprint server.

RUDN University biologist found sex differences in inflammatory reactions in rat pups
A biologist from RUDN University studied the development of the immune response in prepubertal male and female animals.

Remote cardiac rehabilitation programs are effective alternatives to on-site services
Outpatient cardiovascular rehabilitation programs were suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic, limiting patients' access to these important services.

Study sheds light on how MSCs suppress inflammation long after they leave the body
A new study released in STEM CELLS might just have solved the mystery behind why mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) continue to suppress inflammation in the body long after the MSCs are cleared from the system.

Risk of severe COVID-19 among workers, their household members
Prepandemic data were used to estimate how many adults at increased risk of severe COVID-19 held essential jobs and couldn't work at home or lived in households with such workers.

Clemson researchers decode thermal conductivity with light
Clemson researchers examine a highly efficient thermoelectric material in a new way - by using light.

Bringing drugs to the brain with nanoparticles to treat neurodegenerative diseases
Researchers from the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) have shown that nanoparticles could be used to deliver drugs to the brain to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

Irish and UK research helps to unravel secrets behind Game of Thrones
A researcher at University of Limerick, Ireland has played a key role in examining some of the secrets behind Game of Thrones.

Maunakea telescopes confirm first brown dwarf discovered by radio observations
A collaboration between the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) radio telescope in Europe, the Gemini North telescope, and the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF), both on Maunakea in Hawai'i, has led to the first direct discovery of a cold brown dwarf from its radio wavelength emission.

Cleveland Clinic researchers identify melatonin as possible COVID-19 treatment
CLEVELAND - Results from a new Cleveland Clinic-led study suggest that melatonin, a hormone that regulates the sleep-wake cycle and is commonly used as an over-the-counter sleep aid, may be a viable treatment option for COVID-19.

Study compares racial disparities in unilateral versus bilateral knee replacement
Analyzing data from the NIS - Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database, researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) found that African Americans were much less likely to undergo bilateral knee replacement compared to white patients.

$1 million to support manufacturing of COVID-19 treatments, vaccines at uOttawa, Ottawa Hospital
Researchers from the University of Ottawa and The Ottawa Hospital have been awarded $1,050,000 million from the Canada Foundation for Innovation to support facilities for manufacturing innovative treatments and vaccines for COVID-19.

A novel finding on Kabuki syndrome, a rare genetic disease
It has a long time since the cause of the disease has been identified: mutations of KMT2D gene codify for MLL4, a protein involved in the regulation of chromatin, which is the complex of proteins and nucleic acids contained in the nucleus of cells.

Distinct slab interfaces found within mantle transition zone
Prof. CHEN Qifu's group from the Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IGGCAS) and their collaborators observed two distinct seismic discontinuities within the mantle transition zone (~410 km to 660 km) beneath the western Pacific.

Electrified magnets: researchers uncover a new way to handle data
The properties of synthesised magnets can be changed and controlled by charge currents as suggested by a study and simulations conducted by physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Central South University in China.

A randomized clinical trial of Greek High Phenolic Early Harvest Extra Virgin Olive Oil in mild cognitive impairment: the MICOIL pilot study
Greek researchers and clinicians investigated for the first time the effect of High Phenolic Early Harvest Extra Virgin Olive Oil (HP-EH-EVOO) versus Moderate Phenolic (MP-EVOO) and Mediterranean Diet (MeDi) as a therapeutic pharmaceutical natural compound for older adults with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI).

Global fisheries could alleviate a global food emergency in extreme situations
A new international study argues that, if managed sustainably in advance, global fisheries could alleviate food shortages even after a nuclear war.

Attending an HBCU may protect Black students from later health problems
African Americans who attend Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCUs) may be at lower risk for health problems later in adulthood compared to African Americans who attend predominantly white institutions, a new study suggests.

Nothing but the truth in the fight against cancer
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have found that TruB1, a protein known to be involved in RNA modification, can directly bind to and promote the maturation of the microRNA let-7.

Researchers present wild theory: Water may be naturally occurring on all rocky planets
Life is deeply dependent on water, but where does water come from?

Cell ageing can be slowed by oxidants
At high concentrations, reactive oxygen species - known as oxidants - are harmful to cells in all organisms and have been linked to ageing.

Trauma hospitalizations fall in Philly during COVID-19 lockdown, but gun violence rises
Non-intentional trauma fell compared to the period before COVID this year, but ratios of gun violence patients increased after stay-at-home orders were implemented, and were high compared to the same timeframe in previous years.

Do spoilers harm movie box-office revenue?
Spoiler reviews have a positive and statistically significant relationship with box office revenue.

Study suggests greater social support linked to lower diabetes distress
Perceived lack of support from family and friends affects a patient's ability to manage type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

Older Latinas please stand up! Simple intervention encourages better health
Overweight, sedentary, postmenopausal Latinas participating in a 12-week standing intervention program greatly reduced daily sitting time, while increasing standing time and stepping time.

'Diseases of despair' have soared over past decade in US
'Diseases of despair', such as substance abuse, alcohol dependency, and suicidal thoughts and behaviours, have soared in the US over the past decade, reveals an analysis of health insurance claims data published in the online journal BMJ Open.

The use of videos in education could improve student pass rates
The results indicate that the videos may help to increase the chances of passing a course.

Study finds evidence of neurobiological mechanism for hallucinations and delusions
A new study from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons has found evidence of a potential neurobiological mechanism for hallucinations and delusions that fits within the hierarchical model of psychosis and can explain their clinical presentation.

Rise of the relationship herbivore -- Japanese increasingly single, disinterested in dates
In 2015 in Japan, 1 in 4 women and 1 in 3 men in their 30s were single, and half of the singles say they are not interested in heterosexual relationships.

New medication may treat underlying causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
Mavacamten, a new investigational cardiac medication, may improve heart function for people with thickened heart muscle leading to obstructed blood flow through the heart, a condition known as obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

The ecology of crop pests
Ecological theory provides insights on pesticide use in agriculture

The natural artistry of disease: a wintry landscape in the eye
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) report a case of frosted branch angiitis in a woman presenting years after being treated for leukemia-lymphoma with allogeneic human stem cell transplant.

Water predictions: Telling when a nanolithography mold will break through droplets
Ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography is powerful method of producing polymer nanostructures by pressing a curable resin onto a mold.

Researchers identify new Rickettsia species in dogs
Researchers have identified a new species of Rickettsia bacteria that may cause significant disease in dogs and humans.

Significant psychological toll from New Zealand COVID-19 lockdown
Research has confirmed the nationwide Alert Level 4 COVID-19 lockdown had a significant toll on New Zealanders' well-being, especially for younger people - but the results were not all negative.

Perspectives of tumor treatment: Researchers investigate combination of carbon ion and immunotherapy
It is still a glance into the future: The combination of carbon ion and immune therapy could become an effective tool in the fight against cancer.

Study finds surprising diversity in early child care
A new study of kindergarteners in one Midwestern state identified seven different pathways the children took in their early education and care before arriving at school.

Blue whirl flame structure revealed with supercomputers
Main structure and flow structure of 'blue whirl' flame revealed through supercomputer simulations.

5 mistakes people make when sharing COVID-19 data visualizations on Twitter
An analysis of coronavirus-related information sharing on Twitter found that average citizens commonly made one of five errors when trying to visually convey the scope of the pandemic, or its effects on society.

Study: Remote learning adds pressure for teachers who work second shift as mothers
The transition to remote learning coupled with an unequal distribution of second-shift responsibilities has placed teachers who are also mothers under immense stress, according to new University at Buffalo research.

Drop in pandemic CO2 emissions previews world of electric vehicles
When the SF Bay Area mandated shelter-in-place March 16, it created a natural experiment for UC Berkeley's Ron Cohen, who had established an inexpensive pollution sensor network in local neighborhoods.

Creating 3D virtual personas of all-solid-state batteries, building a better tomorrow
Scientists are eyeing all-solid-state-lithium batteries as a safer alternative to conventional lithium-ion batteries; but their performance needs much improvement.

New study uses satellites and field studies to improve coral reef restoration
A recent study published in Restoration Ecology by researchers from Arizona State University's Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science (GDCS) found evidence that particulate organic carbon levels are one of the most important factors in determining coral outplant survival.

Machine learning advances materials for separations, adsorption, and catalysis
An artificial intelligence technique -- machine learning -- is helping accelerate the development of highly tunable materials known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) that have important applications in chemical separations, adsorption, catalysis, and sensing.

Uncovering novel genomes from earth's microbiomes
As reported in Nature Biotechnology, the known diversity of bacteria and archaea has been expanded by 44% through a publicly available collection of more than 52,000 microbial genomes from environmental samples, resulting from a JGI-led collaboration involving more than 200 scientists (the IMG Data Consortium) around the world.

Workshop collaboration aims to move tidal marsh research forward
Tidal marshes play a significant role in coastal ecosystems. They are a nursery ground for juvenile fishes and a line of defense in coastal erosion.
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