Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 10, 2020
Penn researchers present findings on cardiac risks for cancer patients
Physician-researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will present findings about cardiac care for cancer patients and survivors at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2020.

Getting single-crystal diamond ready for electronics
Researchers from Osaka University and collaborating partners polished single-crystal diamond to near-atomic smoothness without damaging it.

Study shows walnuts may have anti-inflammatory effects that reduce risk of heart disease
Findings from a randomized controlled trial recently published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, indicate that people in their 60s and 70s who regularly consume walnuts may have reduced inflammation, a factor associated with a lower risk of heart disease, compared to those who do not eat walnuts.

Chemicals in your living room cause diabetes
A new UC Riverside study shows flame retardants found in nearly every American home cause mice to give birth to offspring that become diabetic.

The Lancet: Older adults are at greater risk of cardiovascular events than younger people, and benefit at least as much from cholesterol-lowering medications, two studies suggest
Peer-reviewed / 1 Observational study + 1 Systematic review and meta-analysis / People

New research identifies 'triple trouble' for mangrove coasts
Some of the world's most valuable ecosystems are facing a ''triple threat'' to their long-term durability and survival, new research shows.

Valves on N95 masks do not filter exhaled droplets
Matthew Staymates, fluid dynamicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, is studying different mask types to determine which are the most effective at reducing disease transmission.

Tracking down the causes of heart attack
Heart attacks strike suddenly and have a range of different triggers.

Empathy and perspective taking: How social skills are built
Being able to feel empathy and to take in the other person's perspective are two abilities through which we understand what is going on in the other's mind.

Demolishing abandoned houses does not reduce nearby crime, study finds
A study conducted by the University of Kansas compared crime rates near abandoned houses that were demolished and similar properties that were not, finding no reduction in violent or property crime near those torn down.

New technique may revolutionize accuracy and detection of biomechanical alterations of cells
Scientists have developed an optical elastography technique that could revolutionise the accuracy and ease to which health professionals can detect biomechanical alterations of cells and tissues.

Scientists develop AI-powered 'electronic nose' to sniff out meat freshness
Scientists led by NTU Singapore have invented an artificial olfactory system that mimics the mammalian nose to assess the freshness of meat accurately.

Schools unfairly targeting vulnerable children with exclusion policies
Australian schools are unfairly suspending and excluding students - particularly boys, Indigenous students, and students with a disability - according to new research from the University of South Australia.

Researchers find a backup mechanism that removes cellular debris from the brain
Microglia -- the brain's immune cells -- play a primary role in removing cellular debris from the brain.

Induced liver regeneration enhances CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene repair
Use of thyroid hormone to boost hepatocyte proliferation enhanced the efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene correction in the mouse liver.

Printable ink guides cell growth, offers nerve injury hope
New research has cracked a major challenge in the emerging field of nerve engineering.

Stanford researchers develop DNA approach to forecast ecosystem changes
The rapid, low-cost technique is the first to analyze DNA left behind in animals' feces to map out complex networks of species interactions in a terrestrial system.

Analysis of Trump's tweets reveals systematic diversion of the media
New research published today in Nature Communications claims to provide the first evidence-based analysis demonstrating the US President's Twitter account has been routinely deployed to divert attention away from a topic potentially harmful to his reputation, in turn suppressing negative related media coverage.

Plasma treatments quickly kill coronavirus on surfaces
Researchers from UCLA believe using plasma could promise a significant breakthrough in the fight against the spread of COVID-19.

Methods developed by biorobotics engineers help make hydropower plants more fish-friendly
In the Europe-wide FIThydro project, TalTech researchers worked with industry partners to study existing hydroelectric power plants.

Researchers model source of eruption on Jupiter's moon Europa
A new model shows how brine on Jupiter's moon Europa can migrate within the icy shell to form pockets of salty water that erupt to the surface when freezing.

Researchers 3D print biomedical parts with supersonic speed
Forget glue, screws, heat or other traditional bonding methods. A Cornell University-led collaboration has developed a 3D printing technique that creates cellular metallic materials by smashing together powder particles at supersonic speed.

Shedding new light on the origin of metastases
Before an effective treatment can be devised, we have to be able to understand the specific effect of an anti-cancer substance on the cell type that produces metastases in the cellular heterogeneity of tumours.

SwRI scientist studies tiny craters on Bennu boulders to understand asteroid's age
Last week NASA snagged a sample from the surface of asteroid Bennu, an Empire State Building-sized body that Southwest Research Institute scientists have helped map with nearly unprecedented precision.

Speed, evidence, safety characteristics of vaccine approvals by FDA
Amid an urgent need to develop a safe and effective vaccine to prevent COVID-19, researchers evaluated all new vaccines approved by the US Food and Drug Administration over the last decade, characterizing premarket development and regulatory review times, the clinical evidence on which approval was based, and the size and follow-up duration of the prelicensure safety database.

November/December 2020 Annals of Family Medicine tip sheet
Annals of Family Medicine is a peer-reviewed, indexed research journal that provides a cross-disciplinary forum for new, evidence-based information affecting the primary care disciplines.

Microbe "rewiring" technique promises a boom in biomanufacturing
Berkeley Lab researchers have achieved unprecedented success in modifying a microbe to efficiently produce a compound of interest using a computational model and CRISPR-based gene editing.

Study reveals how premature menopause increases risk of cardiovascular disease
New research has found that premature menopause was associated with a 36 percent higher likelihood of having certain blood cell mutations which, in turn, were linked with a 36 percent higher risk of developing coronary artery disease.

Group size and makeup affect how social birds move together
Scientists have shown that the size and makeup of groups of social birds can predict how efficiently they use and move through their habitat, according to new findings published today in eLife.

New primary care tool to prescribe referrals for community health and social services
CommunityRx-H3 is a practice-level, customizable community resource referral system that uses evidence-based algorithms to auto-generate a list of community resources to address such needs.

3D printed stents that treat inflammation
POSTECH Professor Dong-Woo Cho's research team develops bioink-loaded esophageal stents for treating radiation esophagitis.

Tomosynthesis with synthetic mammography improves breast cancer detection
Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), in combination with synthetic mammography, improves cancer detection over digital mammography alone, according to a new study.

Personalized cancer vaccine clinical trial to expand following promising early results
A University of Arizona Health Sciences clinical trial to study safety and effectiveness of a personalized cancer vaccine combined with immunotherapy drug Pembrolizumab will expand after promising preliminary data was presented at the Society for the Immunotherapy of Cancer's annual meeting.

Solar perovskite production on a roll
High-performance perovskite solar cells are made using a manufacturing-friendly liquid-based process suitable for roll to roll production.

Diabetes epidemic detected among Xavante indigenous community in Central Brazil
Researchers examine retinas and find high prevalence of type 2 diabetes as well as ocular problems caused by the disease.

Jacky dragon moms' time in the sun affects their kids
A new study conducted at the University of New South Wales and published in the November/December 2020 issue of Physiological and Biochemical Zoology sheds light on a possible connection between an animal's environmental conditions and the traits of its offspring.

Potentially preventable hospitalizations among older adults: 2010-2014
When complications due to diabetes, asthma, urinary tract infections, high blood pressure and other common conditions lead patients to visit the ER, researchers and health care quality administrators may label these visits as ''potentially preventable hospitalizations.'' That is, with good outpatient care, these visits could have been potentially avoided.

Efforts needed to better integrate family caregivers into health care teams
An estimated 53 million family members and friends provide care assistance to loved ones in the United States, yet family caregivers face significant barriers coordinating their efforts with the formal health care team.

Fossil shark turns in to mystery pterosaur
Lead author of the project, University of Portsmouth PhD student Roy Smith, discovered the mystery creature amongst fossil collections housed in the Sedgwick Museum of Cambridge and the Booth Museum at Brighton that were assembled when phosphate mining was at its peak in the English Fens between 1851 and 1900.

Study: loneliness highest in the 20s and lowest in the 60s
Seeking to develop effective interventions, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine examined the psychological and environmental factors that lead to patterns of loneliness in different age groups.

Psychological status rather than cognitive status is associated with incorrect perception of risk of falling in patients with moderate stage dementia
Dementia is associated with an impaired self-perception with potentially harmful consequences for health status and clinical risk classification in this patient group with an extraordinary high risk of falling.

New fossil seal species rewrites history
An international team of biologists, led by Monash University, has discovered a new species of extinct monk seal from the Southern Hemisphere -- describing it as the biggest breakthrough in seal evolution in 70 years.

Gambling addiction: an aid from patients' stories
How do people affected by pathological gambling tell their story?

Predicting colorectal cancer risk among average risk persons
Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine research scientists have developed and tested one of the first U.S.-based models to predict personal risk for advanced precancerous polyps and colon cancer in average risk individuals.

Dietary overlap of birds, bats and dragonflies disadvantageous in insect decline
According to a new Finnish study, different groups of insectivores compete for the same type of food.

Studies outline key ethical questions surrounding brain-computer interface tech
Brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies are no longer hypothetical, yet there are fundamental aspects of the technology that remain unaddressed by both ethicists and policy-makers.

A viable vaccine for tough tumors
While immunotherapies work well for some cancers, others are immune-resistant and condemn patients to the severe side effects of long-term chemo treatment.

Explaining the religious vote for Trump
New research by Louisiana State University sociologists indicate it wasn't Christian nationalism that drove churchgoers' Trump vote in 2016.

Research identifies 'volume control' in the brain that supports learning and memory
A molecular regulator made of analog signals is found to regulate electrical signals in the brain.

Gene signature predicts whether localized prostate cancer is likely to spread
Columbia researchers have identified a gene signature in localized prostate cancer that predicts the cancer's odds of spreading and its response to a common treatment for advanced disease.

Representation of female authors in family medicine academic journals is trending upward
After decades of underrepresentation in medicine, women are now entering many specialties in the United States, including family medicine, at higher rates than men.

Low fitness linked to higher depression and anxiety risk
People with low aerobic and muscular fitness are nearly twice as likely to experience depression, finds a new study led by UCL researchers, published in BMC Medicine.

Understanding declining teenage pregnancies in England
Declining rates of teenage pregnancies in England are related to local areas experiencing less youth unemployment, growing Black or South Asian teenage populations, more educational attainment, unaffordable housing, and a lack of available social housing, a recent study has found.

Vocational rehabilitation helps lift people with disabilities out of poverty
Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits do not always keep individuals with disabilities out of poverty.

Researchers discover enzyme suppressing immune response to viral infections
Viruses such as HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C evade or disrupt the immune system to create persistent infections.

Glioblastoma nanomedicine crosses into brain in mice, eradicates recurring brain cancer
A new synthetic protein nanoparticle capable of slipping past the nearly impermeable blood-brain barrier in mice could deliver cancer-killing drugs directly to malignant brain tumors, new research from the University of Michigan shows.

Animal groups consider multiple factors before fighting
Groups of animals consider multiple factors before deciding whether to fight rivals, researchers say.

In the Netherlands, two-way transmission of SARS-CoV-2 transmission on mink farms
In the Netherlands, whole genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks on 16 mink farms has revealed virus transmission between human to mink, as well as from mink to human.

Researchers discover the secret of how moss spreads
University of Copenhagen researchers have discovered how mosses became one of our planet's most widely distributed plants -- global wind systems transport them along Earth's latitudes, to rooftops, sidewalks and lawns worldwide, and as far away as Antarctica.

Effect of vitamin D, omega-3 supplements, strength training on health of older adults
This randomized clinical trial investigated whether vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acid supplements and a strength-training exercise program, alone or in combination, improved health outcomes such as blood pressure and cognitive function among adults age 70 and older.

Veganism: Vitamin B12 is well supplemented, iodine is a matter of concern
Those following a vegan diet have an increased risk of iodine deficiency.

Sticky electrons: When repulsion turns into attraction
Scientists in Vienna explain what happens at a strange 'border line' in materials science: Under certain conditions, materials change from well-known behaviour to different, partly unexplained phenomena.

Chronic stress causes genetic changes in chickens
How can stress in animals be measured? Scientists from Uppsala University and elsewhere have now found that what are known as epigenetic biomarkers could be used to detect long-term exposure to stress in commercially raised chickens.

Respirator 2.0: new n95-alternative introduces sensors for a better fit
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have been working to design a better, reusable respirator that could serve as an alternative to an N95 respirator.

'Goldilocks' neonatal immune response may protect against autism
The causes of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) - including genetic and environmental factors - are not entirely understood.

Burnout can exacerbate work stress, further promoting a vicious circle
Work stress and burnout are mutually reinforcing; surprisingly, the effect of work stress on burnout is much smaller than the effect of burnout on work stress.

New airflow videos show why masks with exhalation valves do not slow the spread of COVID
Using high-speed video and schlieren imaging, NIST researcher Matthew Staymates created videos that show how air flows through masks with and without exhalation valves.

Improving high-energy lithium-ion batteries with carbon filler
Lithium-ion batteries are the major rechargeable power source for many portable devices as well as electric vehicles, but their use is limited, because they do not provide high power output while simultaneously allowing reversible energy storage.

Scientists speed up artificial organoid growth and selection
The method currently used to produce stem cell-derived tissues has a very limited throughput.

Large volcanic eruption caused the largest mass extinction
Researchers in Japan, the US and China say they have found more concrete evidence of the volcanic cause of the largest mass extinction of life.

Optogenetic stimulation improves alterations in Huntington's disease experimental models
A study led by researchers of the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro) has characterized one of the neuronal circuits involved in the development of the Huntington's disease.

Scientists have discovered an ancient lake bed deep beneath the Greenland ice
Scientists have detected what they say are the sediments of a huge ancient lake bed sealed more than a mile under the ice of northwest Greenland--the first-ever discovery of such a sub-glacial feature anywhere in the world.

Frugal science--a low-cost way to decontaminate PPE equipment
In the age of COVID-19, being able to MacGyver a solution to reliably decontaminate masks and other PPE equipment could make a real impact.

High temperatures threaten the survival of insects
Insects have difficulties handling the higher temperatures brought on by climate change, and might risk overheating.

Surrey helps to produce the world's first neutron-rich, radioactive tantalum ions
An international team of scientists have unveiled the world's first production of a purified beam of neutron-rich, radioactive tantalum ions.

Editorial: New research strengthens the case for e-cigarettes as smoking cessation aids
Using FDA-approved smoking cessation aids increases the likelihood of success, but many smokers who use these therapies still struggle to remain tobacco free, says Nancy Rigotti, an investigator at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Stanford-led team creates a computer model that can predict how COVID-19 spreads in cities
The study merges demographic data, epidemiological estimates and anonymous cellphone location information, and appears to confirm that most COVID-19 transmissions occur at ''superspreader'' sites like full-service restaurants, fitness centers and cafes, where people remain in close quarters for extended periods.

Mari and Karelian respondents share ideas on how to improve local education
Based on the findings, researchers have come up with a list of recommendations that would support the development of education systems and educational opportunities in the Republic of Mari El and the Republic of Karelia in accordance with the wishes and needs of their Indigenous communities.

Scientists use bacteria as micro-3D printers
A team at Aalto University has used bacteria to produce intricately designed three-dimensional objects made of nanocellulose.

Racial/ethnic minorities comprise small portion of patients referred with AL amyloidosis
Despite being theoretically at an increased risk for AL amyloidosis, underrepresented minorities make up only a small percentage of patients seen at specialized treatment centers for this disease.

Radioactive elements may be crucial to the habitability of rocky planets
The amount of long-lived radioactive elements incorporated into a rocky planet as it forms may be a crucial factor in determining its future habitability.

Study of LGBTQ+ experience in the geosciences finds difficulties, dangers in fieldwork
An investigation from University of Kansas researchers examines the challenges of fieldwork for LGBTQ+ geoscientists.

Six ways primary care "medical homes" are lowering health care spending
New analysis of 394 U.S. primary care practices identifies the aspects of care delivery that are associated with lower health care spending and lower utilization of emergency care and hospital admissions.

Making 3D nanosuperconductors with DNA
A platform for making 3D superconducting nano-architectures with a prescribed organization could find application in quantum computing and sensing.

Smart devices to schedule electricity use may prevent blackouts
Power plants generate electricity and send it into power lines that distribute energy to nodes where it can be used.

Skills development in Physical AI could give birth to lifelike intelligent robots
New research suggests combining educational topics and research disciplines to help researchers breathe life into lifelike intelligent robots.

Do neurosurgeons face sexual harassment in their profession?
Describes sexual harassment in the profession of neurosurgery based on questionnaire results.

As cancer has evolved, it is time for cancer research to do the same
Marking Lung Cancer Awareness month, a new study investigates the extent to which human-based, non-animal approaches are supplanting animal models in cancer research - comparing number of publications, funding, and publications associated with clinical trials between xenograft models and human organoids.

Rapid test can ID unknown causes of infections throughout the body
UC San Francisco scientists have developed a single clinical laboratory test capable of zeroing in on the microbial miscreant afflicting patients hospitalized with serious infections in as little as six hours -- irrespective of what body fluid is sampled, the type or species of infectious agent, or whether physicians start out with any clue as to what the culprit may be.

Hundreds of copies of Newton's Principia found in new census
A systematic search for copies of the first edition of Newton's Principia (1687) unearthed copies in at least 27 countries, yielding new insights about how people engaged with the famous book.

Postpartum care fails to provide women with key recommended services
Most women are receiving fewer than half the services recommended during their comprehensive postpartum medical checkup, according to a study by University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers.

Weighing space dust with radar
It is thought that over 1,000 kilograms of so-called interplanetary dust falls to Earth every day.

Concurrent sharing of an avatar body by two individuals in virtual reality
Two participants were embodied within a shared avatar in virtual reality.

Organoids produce embryonic heart
Bioengineers at EPFL have used organoids - tiny lab-grown organs - to mimic the early development of the heart in the mouse embryo.

Exoskeletons can reduce strain also in health care
Wearable exoskeletons are increasingly being used in physically demanding jobs to support good ergonomics and augment muscular strength.

Mount Sinai develops machine learning models to predict critical illness and mortality in COVID-19 patients
Could Help Improve Patient Care, Health Outcomes, and Allocation of Hospital Resources

Lack of positivity bias can predict relapse in bipolar disorder
Relapse in people with bipolar disorder can be predicted accurately by their tendency towards having pessimistic beliefs, according to a study published today in eLife.

Changes needed to improve UK COVID-19 testing and build strong diagnostic services
More investment and important changes are needed to boost UK testing services, to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic and build a diagnostics service that will head off future UK health challenges, says a meeting report* published by the Academy of Medical Sciences today [Wednesday 11 November 2020].

Do consumers enjoy events more when commenting on them?
Generating content increases people's enjoyment of positive experiences.

Sweet taste reduces appetite?
To date, very little is known about how sweetness perception contributes to satiety.

Oncotarget: IGF2 expression in breast cancer tumors and in breast cancer cells
The Oncotarget authors propose that methylation of DVDMR represents a novel epigenetic biomarker that determines the levels of IGF2 protein expression in breast cancer.

Study identifies new "hidden" gene in COVID-19 virus
Researchers have discovered a new ''hidden'' gene in SARS-CoV-2--the virus that causes COVID-19--that may have contributed to its unique biology and pandemic potential.

Simultaneous kidney transplant plus weight loss surgery safe for obese patients
A new study shows that robotic-assisted kidney transplant and weight loss surgery can be performed safely.

UChicago scientists uncover secrets to designing brain-like devices
Pritzker Molecular Engineering researchers predicted design rules for devices that mimic what occurs in our brain's neurons and synapses.

Two genes regulate social dominance
Using the Nobel Prize gene-editing technique, a University of Houston researcher has found that two genes regulate social dominance in cichlid fish and - possibly - humans.

RUDN University linguists: Vocabulary size affects ability to differentiate foreign language vowels
A team of linguists from RUDN University established that a person's ability to accurately differentiate between vowel sounds of a foreign language correlates with the size of their vocabulary in said language.

Swedish, Finnish and Russian wolves closely related
The Scandinavian wolf originally came from Finland and Russia, and unlike many other European wolf populations its genetic constitution is virtually free from dog admixture.

Russian scientists created a chemical space mapping method and cracked the mystery of Mendeleev number
Scientists from Skoltech puzzled out the physical meaning of the mysterious Mendeleev Numbers and suggested calculating them based on the fundamental properties of atoms.

Trace amine-associated receptor 5 (TAAR5) to rewire your brain naturally
Researchers have found a new role for recently discovered neurotransmitter system that uses the trace amine-associated receptor 5 (TAAR5) for neurotransmission.

Taking a scalpel to opioid painkiller risks: New studies show progress and opportunity
Several new studies add to the understanding of risks from surgical opioids, and show what happens when surgical teams work together to reduce the emphasis on, and supply of, opioid painkillers while still seeking to ease surgery patients' pain.

Study: crop diversification can improve environmental outcomes without sacrificing yields
Diversifying agricultural systems beyond a narrow selection of crops leads to a range of ecosystem improvements while also maintaining or improving yields, according to a new study that analyzed thousands of previously conducted experiments.

Fish give insight on sound sensitivity in autism
Scientists at The University of Queensland used zebrafish that carry the same genetic mutations as humans with Fragile X syndrome and autism, and discovered the neural networks and pathways that produce the hypersensitivities to sound in both species.

USPSTF statement on screening for high blood pressure in children, adolescents
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to make a recommendation about screening for high blood pressure in children and adolescents.

Mining rocks in orbit could aid deep space exploration
The first mining experiments conducted in space could pave the way for new technologies to help humans explore and establish settlements on distant worlds, a study suggests.

Urban gulls adapt foraging schedule to human activity patterns
If you've ever seen a seagull snatch a pasty or felt their beady eyes on your sandwich in the park, you'd be right to suspect they know exactly when to strike to increase their chances of getting a human snack.

RNA structures of coronavirus reveal potential drug targets
The SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus RNA genome structure was studied in detail by researchers from the University of Groningen, the International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology in Warsaw, and Leiden University.

Galaxies have gotten hotter as they've gotten older
Who says you can't get hotter with age? Researchers from Johns Hopkins University and other institutions have found that, on average, the temperature of galaxy clusters today is 4 million degrees Fahrenheit.

Diseases of despair diagnoses increase in Pennsylvania
Medical diagnoses involving alcohol-related disorders, substance-related disorders and suicidal thoughts and behaviors -- commonly referred to as diseases of despair -- increased in Pennsylvania health insurance claims between the years 2007 and 2018, according to researchers from Penn State Clinical and Translational Science Institute and Highmark Health Enterprise Analytics.

Weight loss shouldn't be the goal of PE
For adults, the goal of exercise is often to shed some pounds, but new research from the University of Georgia suggests the objective should be different for kids.

Survey of COVID-19 research provides fresh overview
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have explored all COVID-19 research published during the initial phase of the pandemic.

Under-insured transgender americans turn to riskier sources for gender-affirming hormones
Transgender people who lack access to insurance coverage for gender-affirming hormone therapy are more likely to use hormones from sources other than a licensed prescriber, compared to those with insurance coverage.

New analysis finds lung cancer screening reduces rates of lung cancer-specific death
Low-dose CT screening methods may prevent one death per 250 at-risk adults screened, according to a meta-analysis of eight randomized controlled clinical trials of lung cancer screening.

Treating opioid addiction in primary care helps patients and cash-strapped medical practices
Buprenorphine-based treatment for opioid addiction is in short supply in many areas of the United States.

Black hole or no black hole: On the outcome of neutron star collisions
A new study lead by GSI scientists and international colleagues investigates black-hole formation in neutron star mergers.

Effectiveness of e-cigarettes plus counseling vs only counseling for quitting smoking
Researchers in this randomized clinical trial compared the effect on adults trying to quit smoking of using e-cigarettes plus individual counseling versus counseling alone.

New research maps potential global spread of devastating papaya mealybug pest
CABI scientists have mapped the potential global spread of the devastating papaya mealybug (Paracoccus marginatus), highlighting new areas in Africa, Asia and the Americas into which this pest could potentially invade.

CrystEngComm celebrates the CSD in a special issue
The journal CrystEngComm has published a special issue to mark the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) reaching 1 million structures, with 33 papers that highlight the breadth of applications made possible with this data.

Mindfulness interventions can change health behaviors -- integrated model helps to explain how they work
A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness of mindfulness approaches to promote positive changes in health behaviors.

Study finds lasting fatigue common after COVID-19 infection
More than half of people with acute COVID-19 infection continue to have persistent fatigue 10 weeks after their initial illness, according to a new study published November 9 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Liam Townsend of Trinity College Dublin, Ireland and colleagues.

The universe is getting hot, hot, hot, a new study suggests
The universe is getting hotter, a new study has found.

Strenuous work during pregnancy increases likelihood of high birth weight
For the first time, researchers have attributed an understudied adverse fetal outcome to the strenuousness of an expectant mother's job.

The EAR-PC study findings encourages screening for hearing loss in older adults
Hearing loss is the second most common disability in the United States and comes with it a higher risk for being diagnosed with significant health conditions, such as hypertension, diabetes, dementia and depression, as well as higher health care cost and use.

New primate species discovered in Myanmar
100 year-old London museum sample gave decisive hints.

When kids watch a lot of TV, parents may end up more stressed
The more TV kids watch, the more ads they see and the more likely they are to ask for things on shopping trips.

Electrical stimulation reduces swallowing problems in patients with neurological conditions
Using electrical stimulation in the throats of patients recovering from conditions such as strokes or head injuries will help to relieve swallowing problems, leading to a quicker recovery time, according to a new study.

Ultrafast laser experiments pave way to better industrial catalysts
Arizona State University's Scott Sayres and his team have recently published an ultrafast laser study on uncharged iron oxide clusters, which could ultimately lead to the development of new and less-expensive industrial catalysts.

3D-printed weather stations could enable more science for less money
3D printing and low-cost sensors have made it possible to build a weather station for a few hundred dollars.

Rice has many fathers but only two mothers
University of Queensland scientists studied more than 3000 rice genotypes and found diversity was inherited through two maternal genomes identified in all rice varieties.

Faster disclosure under RTRS delivering transparency that helps muni market stakeholders
University of Oregon researchers have found three-fold benefits when the gap in trade reporting in municipal bond markets changed from a full day to fifteen minutes after implementation of the Real-Time Transaction Reporting System.

New study finds a link between sleep apnea and increased risk of dementia
A new study by Monash University has found that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been linked to an increased risk of dementia.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.