Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 11, 2020
Vitamin C's effectiveness against COVID may hinge on vitamin's natural transporter levels
High doses of vitamin C under study for treating COVID-19 may benefit some populations, but investigators exploring its potential in aging say key factors in effectiveness include levels of the natural transporter needed to get the vitamin inside cells.

Sorting out viruses with machine learning
Researchers at Osaka University created a machine-learning system to identify single viral particles that cause respiratory diseases, including coronavirus, using silicon nanopores.

Team sport lowers blood pressure in postmenopausal women
Team sport effectively counteracts diminished vascular function in women with high blood pressure, even several years after the onset of menopause.

Researchers discover a new way to produce hydrogen using microwaves
A team of researchers from the Universitat Politècnica de València and the Spanish National Research Council has discovered a new method that makes it possible to transform electricity into hydrogen or chemical products by solely using microwaves - without cables and without any type of contact with electrodes.

Review of plants' role in antibacterial activity clears new paths for drug discovery
Chemical Reviews published the work by researchers at Emory University, which includes 459 plant natural products that met rigorous criteria for demonstrating antibacterial activity.

Targeted therapies developed to reduce lung fibrosis
A new treatment option for lung fibrosis is being developed by Purdue University scientists.

Cascade amplified upconversion luminescence facilitating narrow band NIR photodetection
Facing the fact that selective detection of multiple narrow spectral bands in the near-infrared (NIR) region still poses a fundamental challenge.

Calls to city 311 lines can predict opioid overdose hotspots
Service requests to city non-emergency telephone lines can help identify 'hotspots' for opioid use and overdoses, a study in Columbus found.

Cassava may benefit from atmospheric change more than other crops
A team from the University of Illinois and Monash University studied how the root crop cassava, which feeds over 1 billion people, will adapt to the amount of carbon dioxide expected by the second half of this century.

Tree rings may hold clues to impacts of distant supernovas on Earth
Massive explosions of energy happening thousands of light-years from Earth may have left traces in our planet's biology and geology, according to new research by University of Colorado Boulder geoscientist Robert Brakenridge.

Folding proteins feel the heat, and cold
A new study shows proteins that presumably evolved to avoid water as they fold may actually behave in ways scientists did not anticipate.

UTSA research team makes breakthrough discovery on brain cortex functionality
A team of researchers from UTSA's Neurosciences Institute is challenging the historical belief that the organization of the cortical circuit of GABAergic neurons is exclusively local.

University of Pittsburgh neuroscientists advance understanding of pain from light touch
Researchers from the Pittsburgh Center for Pain Research uncovered additional complexities behind mechanical allodynia - the sensation of pain from innocuous stimuli, such as light touch.

Modelling microswimmers for drug delivery
An international group of theoretical physicists led by Abdallah Daddi-Moussa-Ider from Düsseldorf, Germany, has modelled the motion of microscopic, motile bodies - either powered micro-machines or living cells - in viscous liquid drops, using the Navier-Stokes equations.

Robotic AI learns to be spontaneous
Autonomous functions for robots, such as spontaneity, are highly sought after.

Tips for making nanographene
Nanographene is a material that is anticipated to radically improve solar cells, fuel cells, LEDs and more.

Animation reveals secrets of critical tumour protein
The latest animation technology has revealed the molecular detail of how our bodies are protected from cancer by a key 'tumour suppressor' protein called p53.

Building your professional brand in a prestigious job
Individuals trying to manage their professional brands while holding prestigious posts should strive to strike a balance between benefiting from the affiliation while at the same time maintaining their professional independence.

The lung microbiome may affect lung cancer pathogenesis and prognosis
Enrichment of the lungs with oral commensal microbes was associated with advanced stage disease, worse prognosis, and tumor progression in patients with lung cancer, according to results from a study published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Scientists can now scoop contents of individual cells from their local environment
The new tool combines cell microscopy with the single-cell DNA and protein sequencing technology to enable connecting important information about the cell's physical features and its local environment to its molecular makeup.

Could reduced lead exposure explain the downward trend in hip fractures?
Hip fractures are one of the leading causes of hospitalization among older adults and are a strong predictor of mortality.

Ohio State study finds playing brain games before surgery helps improve recovery
A new study by led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine finds that exercising your brain with ''neurobics'' before surgery can help prevent post-surgery delirium.

Engineering a way out of climate change: Genetically modified organisms could be the key
Fighting the imminent climate change crisis has now become a global priority.

Observation of four-charm-quark structure
Hadrons are composed of quarks, a type of fundamental particle, bound by the strong interaction.

Identifying the microscopic mechanism of vibrational energy harvesters
The Japanese research team elucidated the microscopic mechanism in which amorphous silica becomes negatively charged as a vibrational energy harvester, which is anticipated to achieve self-power generation without charging, as it is needed for IoT that is garnering attention in recent years with its 'trillion sensors' that create a large-scale network of sensors.

New source of lymphatic system leak discovered in children with rare open heart surgery complication
Interventional radiologists with Nemours Children's Health System have identified a new source of abnormal lymphatic flow between the liver and the lungs that may be responsible for some cases of plastic bronchitis.

Sixty-year old cohort study reveals adolescent value predicts wellbeing in older age
Subjective wellbeing leads to better health, but we did not know what in our younger years determines our wellbeing in old age.

DNA repair supports brain cognitive development
Researchers at Osaka University showed that the enzyme Polβ functions in genome maintenance by preventing double-stranded breaks in DNA during brain development in mice.

Cloth face masks that can be disinfected by the sun
During the COVID-19 pandemic, many people have become accustomed to wearing cotton face masks in public places.

Sleep loss hijacks brain's activity during learning
Sleep is crucial for consolidating our memories, and sleep deprivation has long been known to interfere with learning and memory.

Born to be young?
The environment we experience in early-life is known to have major consequences on later-life health and lifespan.

Scientists release genomes of birds representing nearly all avian families
In the Nov. 11, 2020 issue of the journal Nature, scientists report on the genomes of 363 species of birds, including 267 that have been sequenced for the first time.

Climate-adapted plant breeding
Securing plant production is a global task. Using a combination of new molecular and statistical methods, a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) was able to show that material from gene banks can be used to improve traits in the maize plant.

Potential brain damage marker could guide assessment and treatment of strokes
A team of researchers has discovered that a protein found in the nervous system can predict the severity of brain damage and long-term outcomes in patients who have suffered a stroke.

Genetic eraser: Newly developed technology precisely and rapidly degrades targeted proteins
Researchers can now more accurately and precisely target specific proteins in yeast, mammalian cells and mice to study how knocking down specific protein traits can influence physical manifestation in a cell or organism.

240 mammals help us understand the human genome
A large international consortium led by scientists at Uppsala University and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has sequenced the genome of 130 mammals and analysed the data together with 110 existing genomes to allow scientist to identify which are the important positions in the DNA.

Brigham researchers find evidence support relationship between finasteride and suicidality
In JAMA Dermatology, the team reports a signal for suicidality and psychological adverse events among people taking finasteride, namely suicidal ideation among younger men taking the medication for hair loss.

New European consensus on management of osteoporosis in advanced chronic kidney disease
This Consensus is authored by the European Renal Osteodystrophy Working Group, with expertise from the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association and the International Osteoporosis Foundation.

Detecting Alzheimer's disease before symptoms arise
Both of Andrew Kiselica's grandfathers developed dementia when he was in graduate school.

Climate change causes landfalling hurricanes to stay stronger for longer
Climate change is causing hurricanes that make landfall to take more time to weaken, reports a study published 11th November 2020 in leading journal, Nature.

Compounds block stress-enhanced nicotine intake in rats
Stress is a major cause of relapse after people quit smoking.

Treatments for people with early COVID-19 infection is an urgent research focus
COVID-19 treatments for people with early infection are needed urgently, according to a JAMA Viewpoint article by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Director Anthony S.

COVID leads to measurable life expectancy drop in Spain, study finds
Spain's annual life expectancy at birth dropped by 0.9 years between 2019 and the annual period up until July 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sergi Trias-Llimos of the Center for Demographic Studies, Spain, and colleagues.

Uracil switch in SARS-CoV-2 genome alters innate immune responses
Our bodies could be inducing mutations in the COVID-19 virus that activate immune cells to increase the production of pro-inflammatory molecules.

Interlayer ligand engineering of β-Ni(OH)2 for oxygen evolution reaction
Alkoxyl substitution strategy is proposed to enlarge the interlayer distances and tune the interface environments of β-Ni(OH)2.

Conservatives and liberals motivated by different psychological factors, new study shows
Liberalism and conservatism are associated with qualitatively different psychological concerns, notably those linked to morality, shows a new study that explores how political ideology and moral values are connected to motivated social cognition.

Turning heat into power with efficient organic thermoelectric material
Thermoelectric materials can turn a temperature difference into electricity. Organic thermoelectric materials could be used to power wearable electronics or sensors; however, the power output is still very low.

Silicone surface mimics topology, wettability of a real human tongue
The tongue helps people taste food, but structures on its surface also help them sense textures -- something that's also very important when savoring a meal.

New survey reveals toll Covid-19 is taking on mental health in Wales
A new survey has revealed the extent of the impact Covid-19 has had on mental health in Wales with younger adults, women and people from deprived areas suffering the most.

Protein in blood may predict prognosis, recovery from stroke
Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida and collaborators have found that a biomarker in the blood may determine the extent of brain injury from different types of strokes and predict prognosis in these patients.

Professional athletes may not suffer more severe cognitive impairment than others, study indicates
DALLAS - Nov. 11, 2020 - Even though repeated hits to the head are common in professional sports, the long-term effects of concussions are still poorly understood.

Making a case for organic Rankine cycles in waste heat recovery
In a recent research paper, published in the Energy journal, City, University of London's Dr Martin White says cascaded organic Rankine cycle systems could improve the way in which environmentally-friendly power is generated from waste heat.

Virtual reality forests could help understanding of climate change
The effects of climate change are sometimes difficult to grasp, but now a virtual reality forest, created by geographers, can let people walk through a simulated forest of today and see what various futures may hold for the trees.

Employment insecurity linked to anxiety and depression among young adults during COVID-19
Young adults may be less susceptible to the serious adverse health effects of COVID-19, but they have not been absolved from economic and employment downturns -- and there has been little research on how employment insecurity has affected them.

Chemical clues in leaves can reveal ash tree resistance to deadly disease
Naturally occurring compounds in ash leaves could be linked to susceptibility of individual trees to the fungal disease ash dieback (ADB).

Electrochemical oxygen evolution on Hf2B2Ir5 electrode material
Electrochemical oxygen evolution on Hf2B2Ir5 electrode material.

Late-season Arctic research cruise reveals warm ocean temperatures, active ecosystem
Arctic researchers have been visiting the Bering and Chukchi seas off Alaska for nearly 30 years, collecting information about the biological diversity of the watery world under the sea ice.

From 84 days to 5 hours: Telemedicine reduces dermatology consult time
Allowing primary care doctors to take photos and send them to dermatologists improved access to specialty care.

Study of nearly 2,000 Marine recruits reveals asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 transmission
Results suggest the need for widespread surveillance testing to reduce COVID-19 transmission in group settings

AI speeds up development of new high-entropy alloys
POSTECH's joint research team identifies a deep learning method for phase prediction of high-entropy alloys.

Dissecting colloidal glasses using laser as a lancet
IBS researchers in South Korea probe the cage formation of the glass at surgical precision and elucidate the onset of glass transition.

Noise and light alter bird nesting habits and success
By analyzing nesting data from across the contiguous US, the authors found widespread impacts of noise and light pollution on bird nesting habits and success.

Graphene controls laser frequency combs in fiber
Tuning laser frequency combs electrically can enrich diversity of comb outputs and help to stabilize them actively.

MD Anderson researchers present immunotherapy advances at Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer Annual Meeting
Promising clinical results with combination treatments for patients with melanoma and lung cancer highlight immunotherapy advances being presented by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center at The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) 35th Anniversary Annual Meeting & Pre-Conference Programs (SITC 2020) .

COVID-delayed Arctic research cruise yields late-season data
Researchers studying the Bering and Chukchi seas for three weeks in October found no ice and a surprisingly active ecosystem as they added another year's data to a key climate change record.

Trump administration delists gray wolves: Response from the experts
The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscienceaibs.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.

Atmospheric rivers help create massive holes in Antarctic sea ice
Warm, moist rivers of air in Antarctica play a key role in creating massive holes in sea ice in the Weddell Sea and may influence ocean conditions around the vast continent as well as climate change, according to Rutgers co-authored research.

Attosecond boost for electron microscopy
A team of physicists from the University of Konstanz and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München in Germany have achieved attosecond time resolution in a transmission electron microscope by combining it with a continuous-wave laser -- new insights into light-matter interactions.

The transformation of a pair: How electrons supertransport current in 'bad metals'
The repulsive forces between the electrons in bad metals are much stronger than in low-temperature superconductors: so how do particles with the same charge overcome these forces and manage to pair-up and to transport current as it happens in ''traditional'' superconductors?

How molecular chaperones dissolve protein aggregates linked to Parkinson's disease
In many neurodegenerative diseases, proteins clump in the brain, forming so-called amyloid fibrils.

New research explores the thermodynamics of off-equilibrium systems
Arguably, almost all truly intriguing systems are ones that are far away from equilibrium -- such as stars, planetary atmospheres, and even digital circuits.

New prognostic markers for colon cancer identified
The study recently published by MedUni Vienna and collaborative partners nominates ILSs as novel prognostic players orchestrating the pathobiology of metastatic colorectal cancer.

Intelligent surfaces signal better coverage
A mathematical model shows specialized reflective panels could be deployed on a large scale to enhance communication networks in urban areas.

The young resumed risky behaviors earlier than the elderly as COVID-19 pandemic dragged on
Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, old and young individuals did not differ in taking precautions, but over time, older people quickly adopted preventive behaviors and they engaged in more preventive behaviors.

Multiracial congregations in US have nearly tripled, Baylor University study finds
Racially diverse congregations have more than tripled in the United States over the past 20 years, and the percentage of all-white congregations has declined, according to a study by a Baylor University sociologist and two colleagues.

Sugar work: U-M study finds sugar remodels molecular memory in fruit flies
A high-sugar diet reprograms the taste cells in fruit flies, dulling their sensitivity to sugar and leaving a ''molecular memory'' on their tongues, according to a University of Michigan study.

Camel-fur-inspired technology harnesses insulation and evaporation to keep products cool
Scientists developed a passive cooling technology inspired by the way camels stay cool in the hot desert sun.

A survey on artificial intelligence in chest imaging of COVID-19
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review article the authors consider the application of artificial intelligence imaging analysis methods for COVID-19 clinical diagnosis.

Balance dysfunction after traumatic brain injury linked to diminished sensory acuity
Compared with the control group, the TBI group had higher perturbation perception thresholds (PPT) and lower functional scores on balance - findings with important implications.

Scientists discover possible genetic target for treating endometriosis
Michigan State University researchers have identified a potential genetic target for treating an especially painful and invasive form of endometriosis.

Accuracy of rapid COVID test may be lower than previously suggested
The accuracy of a rapid finger-prick antibody test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for covid-19 infection, may be considerably lower than previously suggested, finds a study published by The BMJ.

Selective encapsulation of ultrafine Pd and Pt nanoparticles within the shallow layers of MOF
A solvent assisted ligand exchange-hydrogen reduction (SALE-HR) strategy is demonstrated to selectively encapsulate ultrafine metal nanoparticles (Pd or Pt) within the shallow layers of a MOF, i.e., UiO-67, for highly efficient hydrogenation reactions.

Largest set of mammalian genomes reveals species at risk of extinction
An international team of researchers with the Zoonomia Project has released the whole genomes of more than 80 percent of all mammalian families, spanning almost 110 million years of evolution.

Optoelectronic detectors capable of perceiving light intensity and color
Current optoelectronic detectors are only able to perceive light intensities.

New strategy to 'buffer' climate change: developing cheaper, eco-friendly solar cells
Solar power is an eco-friendly alternative to conventional, non-renewable sources of energy.

Power-free system harnesses evaporation to keep items cool
MIT researchers have developed a two-layer passive cooling system, made of hydrogel and aerogel, that can keep foods and pharmaceuticals cool for days without the need for electricity.

Yale scientists identify protein that protects against Lyme
Yale researchers have discovered a protein that helps protect hosts from infection with the tick-borne spirochete that causes Lyme Disease, a finding that may help diagnose and treat this infection, they report Nov.

Sociologists dispel the 'bad apple' excuse for racialized policing
According to a study by University of Miami sociologists published in the American Sociological Association's Contexts magazine, almost one of five police officers exhibit high levels of implicit, or unconscious, pro-white/anti-Black bias, and roughly one of eight officers exhibit high levels of explicit, or conscious, pro-white bias.

New genome alignment tool empowers large-scale studies of vertebrate evolution
Three papers published November 11 in Nature present major advances in understanding the evolution of birds and mammals, made possible by new methods for comparing the genomes of hundreds of species.

Sensor for smart textiles survives washing machine, cars and hammers
If the smart textiles of the future are going to survive all that we throw at them, their components are going to need to be resilient.

Age gates on alcohol websites are ineffective, Texas A&M research shows
''Age gates'' that aim to keep underage users off alcohol websites are mostly ineffective, a Texas A&M University alcohol researcher found.

Life after COVID hospitalization: Study shows major lasting effects on health, work & more
Outcomes for COVID-19 patients two months after a stay in one of 38 Michigan hospitals include high rates of death, rehospitalization, lingering health issues and problems with work and finances.

Analysis of seroprevalence in Kenya suggests virus exposure more extensive than reported
Researchers analyzing blood samples from blood donors across Kenya estimate that by June 2020, when many COVID-19 deaths were expected in the country but hadn't occurred at such scale, 4.3% of Kenyans had antibodies to the virus.

EMS dispatches for asthma greatly reduced after expanded access to health insurance
The expansion of health insurance in New York City under the Affordable Care Act resulted in a significant reduction in the dispatch of ambulances for asthma emergencies, a study by Massachusetts General Hospital has found.

Vitamin D and Omega-3s bolster health in some active older people
The DO-HEALTH study led by Zurich-based geriatrician Professor Heike Bischoff-Ferrari has examined the effects of simple measures on the health of healthy adults aged 70 or older.

Researchers light-up mouse brain, revealing previously hidden areas susceptible to opioids
New work at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University shows that kappa opioid receptors actually are distributed widely throughout the brain.

Penn researchers develop approach to prevent toxicity tied to neurological gene therapy
Penn Medicine researchers have developed a new targeted approach to prevent a toxicity seen in the sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia after gene therapy to treat neurological disorders.

MTU, UMass researchers preserve viral vaccines without refrigeration
Half of vaccines are wasted annually because they aren't kept cold.

Not all patients with certain type of heart attack receive the same care
An analysis of medical records reveals variability in the tests and treatments that patients with type 2 myocardial infarction receive during and after their hospital stay.

Diagnostic imaging may increase risk of testicular cancer
Early and repeated exposures to diagnostic imaging, such as X-rays and CT scans, may increase the risk of testicular cancer.

Unique access: Doctors, nurses in COVID-19 epicenter aided by proactive personality
A new study from Notre Dame offers the first examination of proactive personality in times of immediate response to a crisis -- the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic at a hospital in Wuhan, China, the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak.

Luddy researchers develop framework to study brain connectivity in living organisms
A new study by IU researchers lays out a large medical analytics framework that can be used in neuroscience and neurology to study brain connectivity in living organisms.

Internal clocks drive beta cell regeneration
Our body can repair itself after a damage. This phenomenon describes how cells that are still functional start to proliferate to compensate for the loss.

National study reveals new insights into avoidable harm in primary care
A national study of general practices in England has revealed the frequency of incidents of significant avoidable harm in primary care, and also important new details.

Golden ticket: Researchers examine what consumers desire in chocolate products
Gold foil, ornate labels and an intriguing backstory are product characteristics highly desired by premium chocolate consumers, according to research conducted by food scientists in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

Connecting two classes of unconventional superconductors
The understanding of unconventional superconductivity is one of the most challenging and fascinating tasks of solid-state physics.

Genetic risk for fatal blood clots identified in IBD patients
In a retrospective study recently published in the journal Gastroenterology, Cedars-Sinai investigators found that a combination of rare and common genetic variants in some IBD patients significantly increased their risk of developing clot-causing thromboembolic diseases.

A molecule from gut bacteria reduces effect of diabetes medication
The action of metformin, the classic drug used to treat diabetes by stabilizing blood sugar, can be blocked by a molecule from the bacteria in our intestines, a University of Gothenburg study shows.

Job interest not a big predictor of job satisfaction
Interest in an occupation matters, but not as much as you might think when it comes to job satisfaction.

Researchers find evidence of pandemic fatigue
A new study from the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology shows that the behavioral responses to COVID-19 differed by age.

In flies, consuming high-sugar diet reduces sensitivity to sweetness
In fruit flies fed a high-sugar diet for one week, a complex that regulates taste-related sensory neurons reprogrammed the neurons to make the flies less sensitive to sweet taste.

Mental health strained by disaster
A new study found that suicide rates increase during all types of disasters -- including severe storms, floods, hurricanes and ice storms -- with the largest overall increase occurring two years after a disaster.

Smell and taste changes provide early indication of COVID-19 community spread
Self-reports of smell and taste changes provide earlier markers of the spread of infection of SARS-CoV-2 than current governmental indicators, according to an international team of researchers.

Use of some contraceptives may temporarily delay a woman's fertility from resuming
Women who stop using some forms of contraception may have to wait up to eight months before their fertility returns, suggests research published online in The BMJ.

How organ functions were shaped over the course of evolution
A large-scale study conducted by molecular biologists from Heidelberg University has yielded groundbreaking new insights into the evolution and regulation of gene expression in mammalian organs.

Studies detail impact of mammal species decline in Neotropics
Group led by Brazilian ecologist shows defaunation wiped out 40% of the ecosystem services provided or supported by mammals, such as ecotourism, disease control and soil formation.

New study points to a better way to ward off asthma triggers
Every day, ten Americans die from asthma. While quick-acting inhalers and medications can reduce inflammation during an asthma attack, people with asthma have few tools to prevent the next attack from coming.

Losing the American Dream
As many Americans struggle to pay their bills, keeping up with mortgage payments can be daunting with the risk of losing one's home.

Dark matter from the depths of the universe
Cataclysmic astrophysical events such as black hole mergers could release energy in unexpected forms.

The mental state of flow might protect against harmful effects of quarantine
A survey of over 5,000 people in Chinese cities affected by COVID-19 in early 2020 suggests that people who quarantined for a longer period of time generally experienced poorer well-being--but that experiencing the mental state of flow reduced or eliminated that link.

On the way to lifelike robots
In order for robots to be able to achieve more than simple automated machines in the future, they must not only have their own ''brain''.

Researchers trap electrons to create elusive crystal
Now, a Cornell-led collaboration has developed a way to stack two-dimensional semiconductors and trap electrons in a repeating pattern that forms a specific and long-hypothesized crystal.

Pediatric surgeon establishes first-ever guidelines for pediatric opioid prescribing
In addition to adults, opioid addiction and misuse affects the pediatric population.

'Smart Wrap' implant may help people better control their bladders
An implantable smart wrap that fits safely and securely around the bladder may one day help people who have under-active bladders, a condition that hinders patients from urinating regularly and comfortably, according to an international team of researchers.

Novel population of neurons identified that control binocular eye movements in 3D space
Researchers have discovered a previously undescribed population of neurons called saccade-vergence burst neurons that help control our eyes as they view in three-dimensional space.

These masked singers are bats
Bats wear face masks, too. Bat researchers got lucky, observing wrinkle-faced bats in a lek, and copulating, for the first time.

Evolution favours new diseases of 'intermediate' severity
New epidemic diseases have an evolutionary advantage if they are of ''intermediate'' severity, research shows.

Researchers show safer, more targeted way to deliver CRISPR gene therapy
Biomedical researchers have come up with a novel way to use a beam of light to deliver CRISPR gene therapy molecules targeting illnesses.

Invisible organic light-emitting diodes reach new world record
You can't see it with the naked eye, but a new fluorescent organic light-emitting diode (OLED) could shed light on the development of innovative applications in devices such as smartphone and television displays using near-infrared light.

Chemists studied the composition of oils extracted from popular medicinal plants
A team of Russian and Vietnamese chemists from RUDN University, Belgorod State University, Ton Duc Thang University, and the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology were the first to study the composition of oils extracted from two flowering plants of the genus Thladiantha that are popular in traditional Chinese medicine.

Governments can curb over-fertilisation
Many countries could be using less nitrogen fertiliser in their agriculture without compromising their crop yields, as an international research team headed up by ETH scientists David Wüpper and Robert Finger are demonstrating.

Is proton therapy the silver bullet for children with brain cancer?
How safe is proton therapy for children with brain cancer compared to the conventional x-ray radiation delivered post-surgery?
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