Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 12, 2020
People of Black and Asian ethnicity up to twice as likely to be infected with COVID-19 as those of White ethnicity
People of Black ethnicity are twice as likely to be infected with COVID-19 compared to those of White ethnicity.

Years of life lost associated with school closures during COVID-19
Potential years of life lost among U.S. primary school-age children associated with school closures during the COVID-19 pandemic are estimated in this decision analytical model.

Exposure to air pollution during pregnancy may increase blood pressure in early life
Researchers study the impact on childhood blood pressure of pre- and post-natal exposure to environmental factors such as pollution, noise, and a dense built environment.

Early-life events linked to lung health in young adulthood
Early-life events, such as the exposure to air pollutants, increases the risk of chronic lung disease in young adulthood, according to new results by researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, published in the European Respiratory Journal and Thorax.

In mice, cadmium exposure during pregnancy linked to obesity in female offspring
In a mouse study aimed at modeling human exposure to the toxic metal cadmium, researchers found that female offspring of mice exposed to cadmium during pregnancy became obese in adulthood, developed fatty livers and could not process glucose normally.

Personalized drug screens could guide treatment for children with brain cancer
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Hopp Children's Cancer Center Heidelberg (KiTZ) have demonstrated that personalized drug screens can be used to identify new therapeutic candidates for medulloblastoma.

Researchers simulate privacy leaks in functional genomics studies
In a study publishing November 12 in the journal Cell, a team of investigators demonstrates that it's possible to de-identify raw functional genomics data to ensure patient privacy.

Researchers find connection between household chemicals and gut microbiome
A team of researchers for the first time has found a correlation between the levels of bacteria and fungi in the gastrointestinal tract of children and the amount of common chemicals found in their home environment.

New maps document big-game migrations across the western United States
For the first time, state and federal wildlife biologists have come together to map the migrations of ungulates across America's West.

Brain metastases cause severe brain damage that can be inhibited by treatment
By using a specific treatment to override this activation, the researchers were able to return cerebrovascular flow to healthy levels.

Low speed on a bumpy road is dangerous for vehicle body, says a RUDN University professor
An associate professor from RUDN University developed a computer model that describes all types of vehicle body damage caused by fatigue failure.

Assessment of SARS-CoV-2 RNA test results among patients who recovered from COVID-19 with prior negative results
Positive real-time polymerase chain reaction nasal-oropharyngeal swab results from patients who recovered from COVID-19 with prior negative results are examined in this study.

Student medical records at UC San Diego make epic change and a California first
UC San Diego was the first university in California to connect 40,000 student health records to the electronic health record platform of its top-ranked academic medical center, UC San Diego Health.

C4 rice's first wobbly steps towards reality
An international long-term research collaboration aimed at creating high yielding and water use efficient rice varieties, has successfully installed part of the photosynthetic machinery from maize into rice.

Soccer players' head injury risk could be reduced with simple adjustments to the ball
To reduce risk of soccer player head injury, a new study recommends preventing how hard a ball hits the head by inflating balls to lower pressures and subbing them out when they get wet.

Canadian discovery: A potential game-changer to reverse alcohol intoxication
In a study published today in Scientific Reports, a Nature Research Journal, a team of researchers led by Dr.

Climate change: Ending greenhouse gas emissions may not stop global warming
Even if human-induced greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced to zero, global temperatures may continue to rise for centuries afterwards, according to a simulation of the global climate between 1850 and 2500 published in Scientific Reports.

Environmentally friendly method could lower costs to recycle lithium-ion batteries
A new process for restoring spent cathodes to mint condition could make it more economical to recycle lithium-ion batteries.

Smaller than ever--exploring the unusual properties of quantum-sized materials
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) synthesize sub-nanometer particles with precisely controlled proportions of indium and tin using specific macromolecular templates called dendrimers.

Bitcoin is COVID immune!
The SARS-CoV-1 coronavirus pandemic has left a significant footprint on the global economy.

In a warming climate, can birds take the heat?
We don't know precisely how hot things will get as climate change marches on, but animals in the tropics may not fare as well as their temperate relatives.

Green Deal: Good for a climate-neutral Europe - bad for the planet
Europe is to become the first climate-neutral continent- this goal of the 'Green Deal' was announced by the EU in late 2019.

Combined intimate partner violence that includes sexual violence is common & more damaging
Women who experience sexual violence combined with other forms of intimate partner violence suffer greater damage to their health and are much more likely to attempt suicide, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care published in the International Journal of Epidemiology today [12 November 2020].

Hearing test may detect autism in newborns
University of Miami and Harvard Medical School researchers who explored responses to the standard hearing test administered to millions of newborns around the world are closing in on a way to detect early indicators of autism--perhaps as early as at birth.

RUDN University chemists developed cheap and eco-friendly surfactants
An international team including chemists from RUDN University suggested an economically feasible and environmentally friendly method to synthesize surfactants.

Stretchable 'skin' sensor gives robots human sensation
Cornell University researchers have created a fiber-optic sensor that combines low-cost LEDs and dyes, resulting in a stretchable ''skin'' that detects deformations such as pressure, bending and strain.

Effect of vitamin B12 injection on vocal performance of professional singers
Researchers in this randomized clinical trial looked at whether a vitamin B12 injection improved mild singing-related symptoms such as reduced stamina and vocal fatigue among professional singers.

Men feel less powerful in their private lives
Men perceive themselves as having less power in their private than in their public lives, a new study from Lund University has suggested.

Racial disparities in pediatric diabetes treatment
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the third most common pediatric chronic disease in the United States, and the risk of the disease has risen sharply in non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children in the last 20 years, data show.

Cannabis to treat gynecological conditions
A significant number of women would consider using cannabis to treat gynecological conditions, primarily gynecological pain.

Novel deep learning method enables clinic-ready automated screening for diabetes-related eye disease
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München together with LMU University Eye Hospital Munich and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) created a novel deep learning method that makes automated screenings for eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy more efficient.

COVID-19 shutdown effect on air quality mixed
In April 2020, as remote work and social distancing policies were in place in Delaware and a number of other states, there was a sense the skies were clearer and less polluted with fewer people on the road.

Pollution and pandemics: A dangerous mix
According to new research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St.

Researchers generate a brain cell type crucial to support neural activity
Researchers of the Department of Cellular Biology, Genetics and Physiology of the University of Malaga (UMA) have succeeded in generating human OLs from pluripotent stem cells derived from patients with nervous system diseases, specifically multiple sclerosis or ALS.

Yale team finds way to protect genetic privacy in research
In a new report, a team of Yale scientists has developed a way to protect people's private genetic information while preserving the benefits of a free exchange of functional genomics data between researchers.

Possible 1,000-kilometer-long river running deep below Greenland's ice sheet
Computational models suggest that melting water originating in the deep interior of Greenland could flow the entire length of a subglacial valley and exit at Petermann Fjord, along the northern coast of the island.

Convenient antioxidant capacity measurement of food
Japanese researchers have developed a system to quickly and easily measure the antioxidant capacity of food.

The COVID-19 pandemic: How US universities responded
A new George Mason University study found that the majority of university announcements occurred on the same day as the World Health Organization's pandemic declaration.

New molecular atlases reveal how human cells grow and develop
Two cell atlases have been created that track gene expression and chromatin accessibility during the development of human cell types and tissues.

Breaking it down: How cells degrade unwanted micrornas
UT Southwestern researchers have discovered a mechanism that cells use to degrade microRNAs (miRNAs), genetic molecules that regulate the amounts of proteins in cells.

Some U.S. states hit harder by COVID-19 food insecurity
Food insecurity in America is reaching an all-time high during the COVID-19 pandemic.

A therapeutic option for glioblastoma using pH-sensitive nanomicelles
A polymeric nanomicelle that effectively delivers to glioblastoma (GBM) was developed.

How willing are patients to enroll in cancer clinical trials amid COVID-19 pandemic?
Researchers surveyed a large group of cancer survivors about their attitudes toward trial participation during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Effect of fluvoxamine vs placebo on clinical deterioration in outpatients with symptomatic COVID-19
This randomized trial compares the effects of fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor with immunomodulatory effects, versus placebo on a composite of dyspnea or pneumonia and oxygen desaturation among adult outpatients with polymerase chain reaction-confirmed mild COVID-19 illness.

Increased early-stage cancer diagnoses tied to ACA's Medicaid expansion, Pitt study finds
The study showed that health insurance expansions increased early-stage cancer diagnoses, while rates of late-stage cancer decreased.

Physics can assist with key challenges in artificial intelligence
Two challenges in the field of artificial intelligence have been solved by adopting a physical concept introduced a century ago to describe the formation of a magnet during a process of iron bulk cooling.

3D printing -- a 'dusty' business?
3D printers are becoming increasingly popular. They can be used to create a wide variety of three-dimensional objects based on computer templates.

Chemists discover the structure of a key coronavirus protein
MIT chemists have determined the molecular structure of a protein found in the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Study: exercise classes reduce loneliness, social isolation in seniors
Seniors who joined group exercise classes experienced decreased loneliness and social isolation, according to a new Cedars-Sinai study conducted before the COVID-19 pandemic.

Advanced atomic clock makes a better dark matter detector
JILA researchers have used a state-of-the-art atomic clock to narrow the search for elusive dark matter, an example of how continual improvements in clocks have value beyond timekeeping.

Interactive virtual reality emerges as a new tool for drug design against COVID-19
Bristol scientists have demonstrated a new virtual reality [VR] technique which should help in developing drugs against the SARS-CoV-2 virus - and enable researchers to share models and collaborate in new ways.

Unexplained brightness from colossal explosion
Astronomers may have potentially spotted a magnetar born from a neutron star merger for the very first time.

New approach to circuit compression could deliver real-world quantum computers years ahead of schedu
A major technical challenge for any practical, real-world quantum computer comes from the need for a large number of physical qubits to deal with errors that accumulate during computation.

Research shows what happens in the sensory cortex when learning and recognising patterns
A study by scientists at the University of Sussex is challenging the common understanding of how mammalian brains work.

Survey: Americans likely to attend large holiday gatherings despite COVID-19
A new national survey by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds that although a majority of Americans plan to take precautions at holiday gatherings, such as social distancing and asking those with COVID symptoms not to attend, many will also put themselves at risk.

UC research finds low rates of contraceptive use in women with kidney failure
New research from the University of Cincinnati finds that women with kidney failure have low rates of contraceptive use.

Special issue: Cooling in a Warming World
In this special issue of Science, Cooling in a Warming World, three Perspectives and three Reviews highlight the wide array of new and improved technologies and solutions that aim to keep us and the materials we rely on cool, in our rapidly warming planet.

JAMA reports fluvoxamine as potential early treatment for COVID-19
The COVID-19 Early Treatment Fund (CETF) announced that JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association, published the results of a Washington University School of Medicine in St.

Dopamine surge reveals how even for mice, 'there's no place like home'
''There's no place like home,'' has its roots deep in the brain.

Catalyzing a zero-carbon world by harvesting energy from living cells
Scientists from Nagoya University have achieved a breakthrough in converting energy-deficient metabolites to a biorenewable resource thanks to a versatile catalyst.

Continuity determines whether physical activity on prescription works for the least active
Ongoing support for several years and focus on the individual.

Astrocytes identified as master 'conductors' of the brain
A team of Duke scientists has found that glial astrocytes are involved in regulating inhibitory synapses by binding to neurons through an adhesion molecule called NrCAM.

UNC Charlotte study finds success in Charlotte-Mecklenburg's efforts to end homelessness
A new comprehensive study from UNC Charlotte's Urban Institute, College of Health and Human Services and School of Social Work shows an effective approach to ending chronic homelessness that helps those in need and benefits communities.

Illuminating tiny proteins in living cells using single-residue labeling tags
SciLifeLab Fellow Simon Elsässer laboratory at Karolinska Institutet reports a method, which allows fluorescent tagging of proteins with the small perturbation -- a single amino acid -- added genetically on either end of a (micro)protein of interest.

Skoltech scientists developed a novel bone implant manufacturing method
Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Design, Manufacturing, and Materials (CDMM) have developed a method for designing and manufacturing complex-shaped ceramic bone implants with a controllable porous structure, which largely enhances tissue fusion efficiency.

Common SARS-CoV-2 mutation may make COVID-19 more susceptible to a vaccine
A common strain of coronavirus has mutated to help it spread quickly, but the spike mutation may make SARS-CoV-2 more susceptible to vaccines under development, according to a new study in Science.

Weather-proof chip aims to take self-driving tech, wireless communications to next level
A new device created by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin can overcome challenges like bad weather to deliver more secure, reliable communications.

Study reveals how to improve natural gas production in shale
A new hydrocarbon study contradicts conventional wisdom about how methane is trapped in rock, revealing a new strategy to more easily access the valuable energy resource.

Cellular survivors
When it comes to complex life -- that of the multicellular variety -- cell death can be just as important as survival.

Time for a new state of matter in high-temperature superconductors
Scientists from Universität Hamburg have pointed out how to create a time crystal in an intriguing class of materials, the high-temperature superconductors.

Children born extremely preterm are more likely to be diagnosed with depression
A study using extensive nationwide registry data showed that girls born extremely preterm, earlier than 28 weeks gestational age, were three times more likely to be diagnosed with depression than peers born close to the expected date of delivery.

This tableware made from sugarcane and bamboo breaks down in 60 days
Scientists have designed a set of 'green' tableware made from sugarcane and bamboo that doesn't sacrifice on convenience or functionality and could serve as a potential alternative to plastic cups and other disposable plastic containers, which can take as long as 450 years or require high temperatures to degrade.

The Strategic Stockpile failed; experts propose new approach to emergency preparedness
A new analysis of the United States government's response to COVID-19 highlights myriad problems with an approach that relied, in large part, on international supply chains and the Strategic National Stockpile.

Image release: Galaxies in the Perseus Cluster
New VLA images show how the crowded environment of a cluster of galaxies affects the individual galaxies, helping astronomers better understand some of the complex details of such an environment.

New study outlines steps higher education should take to prepare a new quantum workforce
A new study outlines ways colleges and universities can update their curricula to prepare the workforce for a new wave of quantum technology jobs.

Research produces intense light beams with quantum correlations
Potential applications of research conducted at the University of São Paulo include high-precision metrology and information encoding.

New prediction algorithm identifies previously undetected cancer driver genes
A new study, led by researchers from the University of California, Irvine, has deepened the understanding of epigenetic mechanisms in tumorigenesis and revealed a previously undetected repertoire of cancer driver genes.

Sustainable tourism--or a selfie? Ecotourism's fans may be in it for the 'gram
A new study by researchers at the University of Georgia suggests ecotourism's altruistic attractions may be overshadowed by another benefit: photos for social media.

How to maximize the potential of marketing agility
Marketing agility is best suited for those marketing decisions where the market response is highly unpredictable, the decision parameters can be broken down into smaller components, and when it is feasible to get quick customer feedback, and when there is less dependence on third parties for executing the marketing activity.

State-level lung cancer screening rates not aligned with lung cancer burden in the US
A new study reports that state-level lung cancer screening rates were not aligned with lung cancer burden.

Nearly 1 in 5 cancer patients less likely to enroll in clinical trials during pandemic
A significant portion of cancer patients may be less likely to enroll in a clinical trial due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Fluvoxamine may prevent serious illness in COVID-19 patients
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have completed a clinical trial suggesting that the antidepressant drug fluvoxamine may help prevent deterioration in COVID-19 patients, making hospitalization less likely.

Re-mapping taste in the brain
A new study from Stony Brook University found that the map of neural responses mediating taste perception does not involve, as previously believed, specialized groups of neurons in the brain, but rather overlapping and spatially distributed populations.

Adaptive governance could help build trust in COVID-19 digital contact tracing apps
Adaptive governance could help earn social license of digital contact tracing apps as a way of managing COVID-19, authors say in this Policy Forum.

Individualized brain stimulation therapy improves language performance in stroke survivors
Individualized brain stimulation therapy improves language performance in stroke survivors.

Innovative machine-learning approach for future diagnostic advances in Parkinson's disease
In a new study led by the Immune Systems Biology research group of the LIH Department of Infection and Immunity, researchers adopted a holistic machine-learning approach to elucidate how the interactions between neuronal mitochondria can serve as a powerful tool to distinguish nerve cells from Parkinson's patients from those belonging to healthy subjects, thereby providing new insights in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this neurodegenerative disorder.

Difficult to implement national corona restrictions in Malawi
Households need financial support if Covid-19 restrictions are to be successful in Malawi.

Exoskeleton-assisted walking improves mobility in individuals with spinal cord injury
''Participants showed improvement regardless of level of injury, completeness, or duration of injury,'' noted Dr.

Research breakthrough achieves fish-free aquaculture feed that raises key standards
After six years of research, a team of scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz has developed a cost-effective new aquaculture feed that eliminates conventional fish meal and fish oil ingredients while also providing better fish weight gain and higher nutritional value in the filet for humans.

Weekly physical activity may help prevent mild cognitive impairment conversion to dementia
Exercising more than once per week is associated with a lower risk of developing Alzheimer's disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment, research published in the open access journal Alzheimer's Research and Therapy suggests.

New bird genomes give insight into evolution of genomic diversity
The Bird 10,000 Genome Project (B10K), an initiative to sequence the genomes of all living bird species, announces the completion of its second milestone--the release of genomes representing 92% of all bird families.

Machine learning algorithm could provide Soldiers feedback
A new machine learning algorithm, developed with Army funding, can isolate patterns in brain signals that relate to a specific behavior and then decode it, potentially providing Soldiers with behavioral-based feedback.

Predicting the risk of severe side effects of cancer treatment
The risk of serious adverse effects on the blood status and bone marrow of patients during chemotherapy can be predicted by a model developed at Linköping University, Sweden.

Birth of magnetar from colossal collision potentially spotted for first time
Researchers spotted a short gamma ray burst 10 times brighter than predicted.

NIST designs a prototype fuel gauge for orbit
Liquids aren't as well behaved in space as they are on Earth.

Transport of water to mars' upper atmosphere dominates planet's water loss to space
Instead of its scarce atmospheric water being confined in Mars' lower atmosphere, a new study finds evidence that water on Mars is directly transported to the upper atmosphere, where it is converted to atomic hydrogen that escapes to space.

Advancing fusion energy through improved understanding of fast plasma particles
PPPL scientists have developed a unique program to track the zig-zagging dance of hot, charged plasma particles that fuel fusion reactions.

Researchers at Goethe University create artificial cell organelles for biotechnology
Cells of higher organisms use cell organelles to separate metabolic processes from each other.

Risk of childhood asthma by caesarean section is mediated through the early gut microbiome
New study highlights long-term perturbations of the early gut microbiome as a possible mechanism for the observed association between caesarean section and increased risk of developing asthma.

Dogs are sensitive to their owners' choice despite their own preference
Inspired by work on infants, researchers investigated whether dogs' behaviors are guided by human displays of preference or by the animals' own choices.

Antiferromagnetic material's giant stride towards application
The quest for high throughput intelligent computing paradigms - for big data and artificial intelligence - and the ever-increasing volume of digital information has led to an intensified demand for high-speed and low-power consuming next-generation electronic devices.

Research finds that UK consumers dislike hormones in beef and chlorine washed chicken
New reveals the extent to which UK consumers dislike food produced using production methods such as hormones in beef and chlorine washed chicken.

New study reveals a holistic way to look at neurons in the brain
A new lens on visual neurons is laying the groundwork for a more complete ''family tree'' of the mammalian brain.

Landslide along Alaskan fjord could trigger tsunami
Scientists noted that the slope on Barry Arm fjord on Prince William Sound in southeastern Alaska slid some 120 meters from 2010 to 2017, a slow-moving landslide caused by glacial melt that could trigger a devastating tsunami.

Mimicking SARS-CoV-2 nasal infection in monkeys
A new rhesus macaque animal model recapitulates the clinical and pathological manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) observed in humans by mimicking natural infection via the nasal route, according to a study published November 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Longding Liu, Qihan Li, Zhanlong He, and colleagues.

Researchers make key advance for printing circuitry on wearable fabrics
Electronic shirts that keep the wearer comfortably warm or cool, as well as medical fabrics that deliver drugs, monitor the condition of a wound and perform other tasks, may one day be manufactured more efficiently thanks to a key research advance.

The connectivity of multicomponent fluids in subduction zones
A team of researchers has discovered more about the grain-scale fluid connectivity beneath the earth's surface, shedding new light on fluid circulation and seismic velocity anomalies in subduction zones.

Charges cascading along a molecular chain
A team of researchers led by Berkeley Lab has developed a method to fabricate a one-dimensional array of individual molecules and to precisely control its electronic structure.

Repeated small blasts put military, law enforcement at risk for brain injury
Military and law-enforcement personnel repeatedly exposed to low-level blasts have significant brain changes - including an increased level of brain injury and inflammation -- compared with a control group, a new study has found.

Vaping may increase respiratory disease risk by more than 40%: BU study
A growing body of evidence points to the health risks of using e-cigarettes (or ''vaping'').

JNCCN study evaluates cost-effectiveness of olaparib for metastatic pancreatic cancer
New research in the November 2020 issue of JNCCN identifies metastatic pancreatic cancer patient subgroups with the highest relative cost-effectiveness from maintenance olaparib, a PARP inhibitor.

Scientists pinpoint two new potential therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis
A collaborative team of scientists has pinpointed two new potential therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis - a painful inflammatory disease that affects an estimated 350 million people worldwide.

Stretchable fiber optic sensors detect complex deformations simultaneously
A novel dual-core optical fiber made from stretchable materials offers a flexible approach to optomechanical sensing, researchers report.

Examining impact of a point mutation in SARS-Cov-2 spike on virus transmission and pathogenicity
The current dominant variant of SARS-CoV-2, containing a D614G substitution in the spike protein, appears to have evolved to enhance transmissibility, according to a new study in human cells and animal models.

Are the movements of tiny hairlike structures a key to our health?
New research from USC scholars identifies the mechanisms in play for cilia to work effectively and productively to push particles and fluid along, which is especially important given their critical role in health and in even ensuring reproduction.

In Europe, climate change counter movement think tanks are conservative and neoliberal
They follow similar patterns to those found in the US, according to a study of which Núria Almiron, a researcher at the Department of Communication, is the first author, carried out in collaboration with researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder (USA) and the International University of Catalonia within the framework of the THINKClima project.

Escape from Mars: how water fled the red planet
Mars once had oceans but is now bone-dry, leaving many to wonder how the water was lost.

Teacher quality scores change depending on students, school, PSU study finds
School districts across the U.S. are increasingly using student test scores to rate the effectiveness of teachers, but a new Portland State University study found that the scores have less to do with individual teachers and more to do with their students and the schools.

Applying environmental genomics to coral conservation
Coral reefs are extremely sensitive to temperature, making them particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

Rats also capable of transmitting hantavirus
A group of researchers from Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have confirmed Germany's first-ever case of animal-to-human transmission involving a specific species of virus known as the 'Seoul virus'.

Once-discounted binding mechanism may be key to targeting viruses
Researchers detail subtle stabilizing effects in cells' ability to recognize coronaviruses that compromise the immune system.

Cysteine synthesis was a key step in the origin of life
All proteins are built from the same 20 amino acids.

San Diego zoo global biobanking advances wildlife conservation and human medicine worldwide
In a study that has unprecedented implications to advance both medicine and biodiversity conservation, researchers have sequenced 131 new placental mammal genomes, bringing the worldwide total to more than 250.

'Rewiring' metabolism in insulin-producing cells may aid Type 2 diabetes treatment
Researchers have discovered a previously unknown way that pancreatic cells decide how much insulin to secrete.

New research reveals potential treatment to delay and manage osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis (OA), a widely acknowledged cause of disability that affects patients' quality of life and has significant economic impact through healthcare costs and loss of earnings.

How will COVID-19 affect our next generation?
Exposure to COVID-19 could pose a risk to the health and aging of individuals who aren't even born yet, according to a newly published analysis.

Model helps predict which infants may develop NAS
A new Vanderbilt-designed prediction model may make it easier to determine which infants will go on to develop neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), a drug withdrawal syndrome in newborns that occurs after exposure to opioids during pregnancy.

Two engineers design and donate a technique to make N95 masks reusable
Two Stanford optics experts provided the proofs that light-based decontamination would be feasible and effective, and designed prototype mask sterilization devices to serve as models for do-it-yourself photonics engineers around the world to copy for use wherever they might be.

First published peer reviews of the WHO solidarity trials
Forthcoming COVID-19 research in Rapid Reviews: adjuvants could improve vaccine efficiency; what are the risks of reinfection; understanding autophagy could inspire new antivirals.

An epidemic outbreak of Mesoamerican Nephropathy in Nicaragua linked to nickel toxicity
For over 20 years, researchers have tried to solve the medical mystery behind Mesoamerican Nephropathy, a form of chronic kidney disease that has caused more than 50,000 deaths in coastal South America.

UCLA researchers create armored emulsions as tiny test tubes for parallel reactions
UCLA bioengineers and mathematicians have invented the first-ever 'armored' emulsions.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.