Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 16, 2020
Dairy cows exposed to heavy metals worsen antibiotic-resistant pathogen crisis
Dairy cows, exposed for a few years to drinking water contaminated with heavy metals, carry more pathogens loaded with antimicrobial-resistance genes able to tolerate and survive various antibiotics.

Corporate fraud may lead to neighborhood financial crimes
After a major corporate fraud case hits a city, financially motivated neighborhood crimes like robbery and theft increase in the area, a new study suggests.

New ALS guideline establishes national standard for managing neurodegenerative disease
The first Canadian guideline for the care and management of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) -- Lou Gehrig's disease -- recommends a patient-focused approach, with attention to holistic and emotional aspects of well-being.

Peel-off coating keeps desalination cleaner and greener
A polyelectrolyte coating enables clean seawater desalination systems without harmful chemicals.

Dieting and weight worries on rise in teens
Significantly higher numbers of Generation Z boys and girls in the UK are dieting to lose weight, and are likely to overestimate their own weight, finds a new UCL-led study published in JAMA Pediatrics.

Cancer metastasis: From problem to opportunity
When cancer metastasizes, it often ends up in the lungs, where the new tumors unleash a cascade of chemical cues that thwart the body's immune response.

Scientific journal launches new series on the biology of invasive plants
The journal Invasive Plant Science and Management (IPSM) announced the launch of a new series focused on the biology and ecology of invasive plants.

Minorities benefit less from regionalizing heart attack care
California's Black and Hispanic communities may be falling further behind whites in the quality of care they receive for heart attacks, despite recent medical efforts aimed at improving the standards of care for these populations, according to a new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco.

New method brings physics to deep learning to better simulate turbulence
Deep learning, also called machine learning, reproduces data to model problem scenarios and offer solutions.

Screening younger women for hereditary cancers may be cost effective
Population-wide screening for genetic variants linked to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer may be cost effective in women between the ages of 20 and 35, according to a study published in JAMA Network Open.

Pharmacy dropboxes can help improve proper drug disposal, PSU study finds
Drug take-back boxes are a safe and secure way to dispose of unwanted medications, but a new Portland State University study shows awareness of these dropboxes as well as knowledge about risks of improper disposal remain low.

Study finds antibiotics before age 2 associated with childhood health issues
In a retrospective case study, Mayo Clinic researchers have found that antibiotics administered to children younger than 2 are associated with several ongoing illnesses or conditions, ranging from allergies to obesity.

Antibiotic exposure in children under age 2 associated with chronic conditions
Children under age 2 who take antibiotics are at greater risk for childhood-onset asthma, respiratory allergies, eczema, celiac disease, obesity and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to a paper written jointly by Mayo Clinic and Rutgers researchers.

Virginia Tech lab proves the concept of a natural approach to antiperspirants
The Virginia Tech Nature-Inspired Fluids and Interfaces Lab, led by Associate Profesor Jonathan Boreyko, has just made a major breakthrough in the study of natural antiperspirants.

New Fred Hutch-led trial shows no benefits of dairy foods for blood sugar regulation
Results from a new trial published by a team led by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center suggests lower dairy intake may be beneficial for people with metabolic syndrome.

Half of researchers worried about long-term impact of COVID-19 to funding -- global study
The impact of the coronavirus pandemic has created concerns amongst the scientific research community that funding to their area will be impacted in the long term, a global survey shows.

Scientists map and forecast apex predator populations at unprecedented scale
Findings will help wildlife managers track and predict the dynamics of large carnivore populations.

Patients at risk of atrial fibrillation may need additional monitoring after heart surgery
There appears to be a high rate of unrecognized atrial fibrillation in the month following heart surgery among people who have an increased risk of stroke, even when atrial fibrillation was not detected immediately following surgery.

Evidence shows human transmission in deadly outbreak of mysterious disease in Bolivia
Researchers have discovered that a deadly virus found in Bolivia can spread from person to person in healthcare settings, raising potential concerns of additional outbreaks in the future, according to new findings presented today at the annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH).

TAVR is dominant form of aortic valve replacement, outcomes steadily improving in the US
Since the approval of the first TAVR device in 2011, more than 276,000 patients have undergone a TAVR procedure in the U.S.

Henderson island fossils reveal new Polynesian sandpiper species
Fossil bones collected in the early 1990s on Henderson Island, part of the Pitcairn Group, have revealed a new species of Polynesian sandpiper.

SwRI scientists expand space instrument's capabilities
A new study by Southwest Research Institute scientists describes how they have ex-panded the capabilities of the prototype spaceflight instrument Chemistry Organic and Dating Experiment (CODEX), designed for field-based dating of extraterrestrial materi-als.

New optical method paves way to breath test for cancer biomarker
Researchers have developed an extremely sensitive, yet simple optical method for detecting formaldehyde in a person's breath.

'The global built environment sector must think in new, radical ways, and act quickly'
The construction sector, the real estate industry and city planners must give high priority to the same goal - to drastically reduce their climate impacts.

Liver condition identified in patients using urine samples: new research
Fifty fragments of proteins, termed peptides, have been identified in the urine of liver fibrosis patients in a new study that could pave the way for a potential diagnostic urine test for the condition if further validated.

Study reconstructs ancient storms to help predict changes in tropical cyclone hotspot
. New research from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) published in Nature Geoscience reveals that tropical cyclones were actually more frequent in the southern Marshall Islands during the Little Ice Age, when temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere were cooler than they are today.

Diaphragm pathology in critically ill patients with COVID-19
The aim of this study was to investigate the association of severe COVID-19 with the respiratory muscles in critically ill patients and compare the findings with those who had been critically ill without COVID-19.

Understanding astrophysics with laser-accelerated protons
Bringing huge amounts of protons up to speed in the shortest distance in fractions of a second -- that's what laser acceleration technology, greatly improved in recent years, can do.

Mediterranean diet helps reduce effects of stress in animal model, study shows
Even before the pandemic and the presidential election, Americans reported some of the highest perceived levels of stress in the world, according to the American Psychological Association.

Analysis paves way for more sensitive quantum sensors
Theoretical researchers at Pritzker Molecular Engineering have found a way to make quantum sensors exponentially more sensitive by harnessing a unique physics phenomenon.

Actively speaking two languages protects against cognitive decline
According to a study led by Marco Calabria, a researcher of the Speech Production and Bilingualism research group and of the Cognitive NeuroLab at the UOC, the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment in Alzheimer patients with a higher degree of bilingualism is delayed.

New molecules derived from cannabidiol are designed with more potent antioxidants
This could be used in treating skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis and epidermolysis bullosa, as well as in the fields of cosmetics and nutrition

OHIO's Franz publishes study on strategies hospitals adopt to address opioid epidemic
Ohio University professors Berkeley Franz, Ph. D., and assistant professor Cory Cronin, Ph.D., along with New York University professor José Pagán, Ph.D., co-authored the article, ''What Strategies Are Hospitals Adopting to Address the Opioid Epidemic?

Cynical hostility presents a potential pathway to cardiovascular disease
Cynical hostility is a potential pathway to cardiovascular disease by preventing a healthy response to stress over time, according to a Baylor University study.

Preventing heart disease should be a priority for people with Type 2 diabetes
Even when risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease are optimally controlled, adults with Type 2 diabetes still have a greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease compared to the general population, according to new research published today in the American Heart Association's flagship journal Circulation.

Early life risk factors predict higher obesity and cardiometabolic risk
Early life risk factors in the first 1000 days cumulatively predict higher obesity and cardiometabolic risk in early adolescence, according to new research led by the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute.

Novel technique 'stuns' arthritis pain in shoulder and hip
A novel outpatient procedure offers lasting pain relief for patients suffering from moderate to severe arthritis in their hip and shoulder joints, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Solar cells: Mapping the landscape of Caesium based inorganic halide perovskites
Scientists at HZB have printed and explored different compositions of caesium based halide perovskites (CsPb(BrxI1−x)3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1)).

Chronic inflammation causes a reduction in NAD+
NAD+, a metabolite central to metabolism, declines with age. This previously unexplained phenomena is associated with numerous age-related diseases and has spawned the development of supplements aimed at restoring NAD+ to youthful levels.

Overly reactivated star-shaped cells explain the unpredictability of Alzheimer's disease
IBS-KIST researchers have demonstrated that the severity of 'reactive astrocytes' is a key indicator for the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

Crossing international borders can be deadly for forced migrants
Crossing international borders can be dangerous, if not deadly, for refugees and asylum seekers, who have been displaced by conflict or a humanitarian crisis.

Reversal of glial scar tissue back to neuronal tissue through neuroregenerative gene therapy
Brain or spinal cord injury often results in glial scar tissue that is correlated to neural functional loss.

Measles outbreaks likely in wake of COVID-19 pandemic
Major measles outbreaks will likely occur during 2021 as an unexpected consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new academic article.

No losses: Scientists stuff graphene with light
Physicists from MIPT and Vladimir State University, Russia, have achieved a nearly 90% efficiency converting light energy into surface waves on graphene.

Novel glass materials made from organic and inorganic components
Researchers from the Universities of Jena and Cambridge have succeeded in creating a new class of hybrid glass materials that combine organic and inorganic components.

Parasite infection discovery could assist mental health treatments
New research into how a common parasite infection alters human behaviour could help development of treatments for schizophrenia and other neurological disorders.

Paleontologists uncover three new species of extinct walruses in Orange County
Millions of years ago, in the warm Pacific Ocean off the coast of Southern California, walrus species without tusks lived abundantly.

Implementing carbon pricing during the pandemic could help countries recover greener, smarter
As economies ''build back better,'' it may be an opportune time to introduce carbon pricing to tackle climate change, according to new Princeton University research.

Seafood mislabeling is having negative impacts on the marine environment
As the most globally traded food commodity, seafood production and its supply chains are often complex and opaque.

Former piece of Pacific Ocean floor imaged deep beneath China
In a study that gives new meaning to the term ''rock bottom,'' seismic researchers have discovered the underside of a rocky slab of Earth's lithosphere that has been pulled more than 400 miles beneath northeastern China by the process of tectonic subduction.

New fiber optic sensors transmit data up to 100 times faster
Fiber optic sensors - used in critical applications like detecting fires in tunnels, pinpointing leaks in pipelines and predicting landslides - are about to get even faster and more accurate.

Researchers discover how to boost vaccine designed to prevent melanoma recurrence
A vaccine created to prevent the recurrence of the deadly skin cancer melanoma is about twice as effective when patients also receive two components that boost the number and effectiveness of immune system cells called dendritic cells, according to phase 2 clinical trial results published in Nature Cancer in November.

Peptide is a key mediator in the regulation of compulsive alcohol drinking
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified that a peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating mediator of compulsive consumption of alcohol.

Computer scientists launch counteroffensive against video game cheaters
University of Texas at Dallas computer scientists have devised a new weapon against video game players who cheat.

X-ray study explores potential of hepatitis C drugs to treat COVID-19
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory investigated the binding properties of several hepatitis C drugs to determine how well they inhibit the SARS-CoV-2 main protease, a crucial protein enzyme that enables the novel coronavirus to reproduce.

Making the best decision: Math shows diverse thinkers equal better results
A Florida State University researcher found that networks that consisted of both impulsive and deliberate individuals made, on average, quicker and better decisions than a group with homogenous thinkers.

A change of heart -- new drug for HCM reduces heart mass
For the first time, a medication has impacted heart muscle thickness and function for patients with the most common inherited heart condition, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rather than simply addressing their symptoms.

Teeth grinding and facial pain increase due to coronavirus stress and anxiety
The stress and anxiety experienced by the general population during Israel's first lockdown brought about a significant rise in orofacial and jaw pain, as well as jaw-clenching in the daytime and teeth-grinding at night, according to a new study from Tel Aviv University (TAU).

Key source of memories
Researchers identify a region of the brain as a key source of signals encoding past experiences in the neocortex.

Scientists discover a new mineral
The research team headed by Stanislav Filatov, Professor at the Department of Crystallography at St Petersburg University, has discovered a new mineral species in Kamchatka - petrovite.

New technology allows more precise view of the smallest nanoparticles
Scientists have reported a new optical imaging technology, using a glass side covered with gold nanodiscs that allows them to monitor changes in the transmission of light and determine the characteristics of nanoparticles as small as 25 nanometers in diameter.

US nephrology fellows' perceptions on home dialysis training
This study assessed nephrology fellows' confidence and clinical experience with these therapies near the completion of their training.

Healthy sleep habits help lower risk of heart failure
Healthy sleep habits are associated with a lower risk of heart failure.

Newly discovered enzyme helps make valuable bioactive saponins
A team led by researchers from Osaka University discovered a new enzyme, closely related to the CSyGT family of enzymes involved in producing cellulose in plant cell walls.

New tool predicts geological movement and the flow of groundwater in old coalfields
A remote monitoring tool to help authorities manage public safety and environmental issues in recently abandoned coal mines has been developed by the University of Nottingham.

Scientists discover new mechanism controlling brain size
International research headed by Danish Scientists has led to the discovery of a new mechanism that controls the size of our brains.

Study identifies patients with lung cancer most likely to respond to immunotherapy
In a new study, researchers at UCLA found patients with a particular type of HLA, a protein scaffold involved in presenting pieces of proteins described as peptides to the immune system, were particularly likely to benefit from immunotherapy.

Who is the world's best super-recogniser? This test could help us find them
Psychologists are hoping the UNSW Face Test will help unearth more of Australia's top performers in facial recognition, known as super-recognisers.

National supplies of protein, carbs and fats can predict your lifespan
A new global study from the University of Sydney has looked at how macronutrient supplies (proteins, carbohydrates and fats) of different countries are associated with the risk of death at different ages.

Fish carcasses deliver toxic mercury pollution to the deepest ocean trenches
The sinking carcasses of fish from near-surface waters deliver toxic mercury pollution to the most remote and inaccessible parts of the world's oceans, including the deepest spot of them all: the 36,000-foot-deep Mariana Trench in the northwest Pacific.

Trifarotene in moderate acne: No study data for the assessment of the added benefit
Trifarotene in moderate acne: no study data for the assessment of the added benefit.

Suffering in silence: two-thirds of older adults say they won't treat their depression
A new nationwide poll, the GeneSight Mental Health Monitor, shows that nearly two-thirds (61%) of Americans age 65 or older who have concerns about having depression will not seek treatment.

Highly sensitive detection of circularly polarized light without a filter
Japanese scientists developed a photodiode using a crystalline film composed of lead perovskite compounds with organic chiral molecules to detect circularly polarized light without a filter.

People in developing countries eat less bushmeat as they migrate from rural to urban areas
New Princeton University research finds that when people in developing countries move from rural areas to cities, they consume less bushmeat over time, perhaps because other sources of animal protein are more readily available

Songbird parents evict young for their own benefit
Parents, you might know the feeling. When kids get pushy and demanding, it's a tempting fantasy to shove them out of the house and let them survive on their own.

Boosted signal
First introduced into wide use in the middle of the 20th century, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has since become an indispensable technique for examining materials down to their atoms, revealing molecular structure and other details without interfering with the material itself.

One-month of dual anti-platelet therapy is safe and feasible after stent placement
A short, one-month treatment combining antiplatelet medication and aspirin followed by an aspirin-only regime was as effective as a 6- to 12-month course of dual treatment at preventing death, heart attacks, strokes, bleeding or the need for additional stent placement.

Cosmic flashes come in all different sizes
By studying the site of a spectacular stellar explosion seen in April 2020, a Chalmers-led team of scientists have used four European radio telescopes to confirm that astronomy's most exciting puzzle is about to be solved.

Chronic alcohol use reshapes the brain's immune landscape, driving anxiety and addiction
Deep within the brain, a small almond-shaped region called the amygdala plays a vital role in how we exhibit emotion, behavior and motivation; it's also strongly implicated in alcohol abuse.

Low levels of choline in pregnant Black American women associated with higher levels of stress
Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that many pregnant Black Americans have low levels of choline, an essential nutrient that aids in prenatal brain development.

SCORED and SOLOIST trials add to evidence for treating diabetes with SGLT2 inhibitors
In these two paired trials, teams of investigators led by Brigham cardiologist Deepak L.

Center for Justice Research Police Reform Action Brief: Ban chokeholds
A chokehold ban will help move this country further toward the elimination of racially-motivated police violence and the longstanding tensions/distrust between minority communities and the police.

A sweeping climate model of the Red Sea
An all-inclusive climate model for the entire Red Sea region is supporting Saudi Arabia's plans for a sustainable future.

The first detection of marine fish DNA in sediment sequences going back 300 years
Far too little is known about the long-term dynamics of the abundance of most macro-organism species.

Tiny cave snail with muffin-top waistline rolls out of the dark in Laos
Recent cave exploration has turned up a tiny, top-heavy snail that glistens under the light of the microscope lens.

Building blocks of life can form long before stars
An international team of scientists have shown that glycine, the simplest amino acid and an important building block of life, can form under the harsh conditions that govern chemistry in space.

Does the human brain resemble the Universe?
An astrophysicist of the University of Bologna and a neurosurgeon of the University of Verona compared the network of neuronal cells in the human brain with the cosmic network of galaxies... and surprising similarities emerged

Deafening insects mask true biodiversity assessed via acoustic surveys in Japan
A collaborative team of ecologists, led by those from Trinity College Dublin, has been using recordings of animal noises to assess biodiversity in sub-tropical Japan.

Solitary bees are born with a functional internal clock - unlike honeybees
Individuals of the solitary bee Osmia bicornis show a 24-h behavioral cycle as soon as they emerge, unlike young honeybee workers who need to perform brood care around the clock and only develop a daily cycle later in life.

Cleveland Clinic led trial shows drug effective in 96% of patients with recurrent pericarditis
Cleveland: Cleveland Clinic researchers leading a global clinical trial have found that rilonacept, an FDA approved drug for other inflammatory diseases, resolved acute pericarditis episodes and reduced risk of pericarditis recurrence.

When temperatures rise, dog ticks more likely to choose humans over canines
A variety of ticks that carry the bacteria causing the deadly disease Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) are more than twice as likely to shift their feeding preference from dogs to humans when temperatures rise, a sign that climate change could expand and intensify human disease risks, according to a new study presented today at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH).

Children misdiagnosed with "impairment of language acquisition"
Around 45% of children in Austrian day nurseries have a first language other than German.

Key patient insights the missing link in understanding COVID-19 and its mutations
A new study led by Australia's national science agency CSIRO, has found 95.5 per cent of current entries in GISAID, the world's largest novel coronavirus genome database, do not contain relevant patient information -- a critical piece of the puzzle to understand the virus and how it is evolving.

Study pinpoints target for managing inflammation, promoting tissue repair
Drugs that can manage the activity of a protein called BCAP could help the body repair IBD-related tissue damage caused by inflammation, according to experts at Cincinnati Children's.

Changes to the brain's reward system may drive overeating in mice
A combination of innate differences and diet-induced changes to the reward system may predispose some mice to overeat, according to research recently published in JNeurosci.

Health care workers most at risk for COVID-19
Health care workers -- particularly nurses -- have a higher prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection than non-health care workers, according to researchers at Rutgers, which released baseline results from a large prospective study of participants at Rutgers and affiliated hospitals recruited during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Bursts of exercise can lead to significant improvements in indicators of metabolic health
Short bursts of physical exercise induce changes in the body's levels of metabolites that correlate to, and may help gauge, an individual's cardiometabolic, cardiovascular and long-term health, a study by Massachusetts General Hospital has found.

Looking inside the glass
Scientists at The University of Tokyo used electron spectroscopy to probe the coordination structures formed by the silicon atoms in aluminosilicate glass.

Orbits of ancient stars prompt rethink on Milky Way evolution
Theories on how the Milky Way formed are set to be rewritten following discoveries about the behaviour of some of its oldest stars.

Exercised over nothing: Masks don't impair lung function during physical activity
A team of American and Canadian researchers report that while they may feel uncomfortable, there is little empirical evidence that wearing a facemask significantly diminishes lung function, even when worn during heavy exercise.

Envision color: Activity patterns in the brain are specific to the color you see
Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have decoded brain maps of human color perception.

Surrey reveals simple method to produce high performing Lithium Selenium batteries
Engineers at the University of Surrey have developed a simple and elegant method of producing high-powered lithium-selenium (Li-Se) batteries.

Scientists reduce levels of molecules that kill neurons in elderly mice with Alzheimer's
Researchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona have developed an antibody fragment that reduces beta-amyloid peptide and tau protein levels, the ultimate cause of neuronal death in Alzheimer's, ameliorating the hallmarks of the disease at its most advanced stage.

Media, NGO framing of climate change affects how people think about issue: studies
In a pair of studies, Hong Tien Vu of the University of Kansas found that the way media organizations and global climate change NGOs frame their messages on the topic does in fact influence how people look at the issue, which in turn affects what action, if any, is taken to fight the problem.

US agricultural water use declining for most crops and livestock production
Agricultural production and food manufacturing account for a third of water usage in the U.S.

Pesticides commonly used as flea treatments for pets are contaminating English rivers
Researchers at the University of Sussex have found widespread contamination of English rivers with two neurotoxic pesticides commonly used in veterinary flea products: fipronil and the neonicotinoid imidacloprid.

Changes in outpatient care delivery, telemedicine during COVID-19 pandemic
To understand how telemedicine compensated for declining outpatient volume and geographic variation in changing patterns of outpatient care, researchers examined telemedicine and in-person outpatient visits in 2020 among a national sample of 16.7 million people with commercial or Medicare Advantage insurance.

Genetic code evolution and Darwin's evolution theory should consider DNA an 'energy code'
Darwin's theory of evolution should be expanded to include consideration of a DNA stability ''energy code'' - so-called ''molecular Darwinism'' - to further account for the long-term survival of species' characteristics on Earth, according to Rutgers scientists.

Recent climate extremes have driven unprecedented changes in the deep ocean
New measurements reveal a surprising increase in the amount of dense water sinking near Antarctica, following 50 years of decline.

Obese people found to be at increased risk of COVID-19
A new study led by researchers at Queen Mary University of London uses a novel approach to investigate the effects of cardiovascular risk factors on the risk of COVID-19 infection.

Better than money? In-kind payments incentivize farmers to conserve agrobiodiversity
An innovative payment scheme for ecosystem services successfully encouraged farmers to cultivate and conserve agrobiodiversity, according to a new study of eight years of implementation in Latin America

Study shows geographic shift in U.S. social mobility
Social mobility differs considerably from country to country. The United States was once exceptional when it came to social mobility but is not anymore compared with other countries, like Canada, Ireland and Sweden.

Cellular powerplant recycles waste gases
Carbon monoxide is a very poisonous gas. Humans die within minutes when they inhale it.

Field research has changed, and so should ethical guidelines, Brown professor says
A social scientist at Brown is calling on research institutions, leading scientific journals and national professional associations to establish new ethical standards that protect human subjects from emotional, financial and political manipulation.

Biochar from agricultural waste products can adsorb contaminants in wastewater
Biochar -- a charcoal-like substance made primarily from agricultural waste products -- holds promise for removing emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals from treated wastewater.

Discovery of protein's 'Achilles heel' paves way for novel class of anti-HIV drugs
it is increasingly clear how Nef manages to subvert human cells' defense mechanisms, enabling HIV to replicate and bringing the symptoms of AIDS closer.

Could robots for sex, friendship improve our aging society?
The current U.S. marketplace for sex robots is geared to fulfilling the needs of young, white, able-bodied, heterosexual males - a population perhaps least in need of such assistance - and simultaneously overlooks a vast demographic of potential customers: senior citizens.

Good long-term effects of continuous glucose monitoring
New data on continuous glucose monitoring for people with type 1 diabetes, over a significantly longer period than before, are now available.

'Alarming' COVID-19 study shows 80% of respondents report significant symptoms of depression
A new national survey, looking at how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted young US adults' loneliness, reveals ''significant depressive symptoms'' in 80% of participants.

A new diagnostic method predicts which cancer patients will respond to immunothe
An international group led by Dr Banafshe Larijani, an Ikerbasque researcher seconded to the Biofisika Institute (UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country, CSIC), has developed a new diagnostic method making it possible to accurately predict which cancer patients will respond positively to immunotherapy.

Quantum tunneling pushes the limits of self-powered sensors
Using quantum tunneling, the lab of Shantanu Chakrabarty, at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St.

New technique isolates brain cells associated with Parkinson's disease
Carnegie Mellon University researchers have developed a new technique for isolating a type of brain cell associated with Parkinson's disease symptoms, enabling them to study that cell type in detail.

New drug can improve fertility in women with reproductive health problems
A drug that acts via the natural 'kisspeptin' hormone system in the body has the potential to treat reproductive health problems in women, according to a new study.

Researchers quantify carbon changes in Sierra Nevada meadow soils
Meadows in the Sierra Nevada mountains are critical components of watersheds.

One step for fibrosis, one giant leap for scleroderma
At the Medical University of South Carolina, a team of researchers has demonstrated a ''moonlighting'' role for lysyl oxidase (LOX) in scleroderma.

Engineered C. glutamicum strain capable of producing high-level glutaric acid from glucose
A metabolic engineering research group at KAIST has developed an engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum strain capable of producing high-level glutaric acid without byproducts from glucose.

Taking charge to find the right balance for advanced optoelectronic devices
Heterojunction structures composed of 2D materials are useful for designing advanced energy devices.

Mobility behavior may be the key to predicting, promoting individual well-being
DSI postdoctoral fellow Sandrine Müller uses smartphone sensor data to study human behavior.

Spiny dogfish eat Atlantic cod: DNA may provide some answers
As dogfish populations recover from overfishing, questions remain about how much Atlantic cod they are eating and its impact on the struggling cod population.

New phase of modeling the viscous coupling effects of multiphase fluid flow
Researchers led by Kyushu University found a way to incorporate key phenomena called viscous coupling effects into models of multiphase flow in porous materials.
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