Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 17, 2020
Overweight and obese younger people at greater risk for severe COVID-19
DALLAS - Nov. 17, 2020 - Being younger doesn't protect against the dangers of COVID-19 if you are overweight, according to a new study from UT Southwestern.

New medication helps heart health in people with chronic kidney disease, Type 2 diabetes
Results of a large, international clinical trial on the novel medication finerenone indicate it reduced the rate of death, heart attack, stroke and hospitalization for heart failure among patients with chronic kidney disease and Type 2 diabetes.

'Vanished' or 'hidden' prostate cancer? Men with negative biopsies during active surveillance have good outcomes
Can early-stage prostate cancer ''vanish'' during follow-up? More likely the cancer is just ''hidden''--either way, negative biopsies during active surveillance for prostate cancer are associated with excellent long-term outcomes, reports a study in The Journal of Urology®, an Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA).

Certain CBD oils no better than pure CBD at inhibiting certain cancer cell lines
Cannabidiol (CBD) oils are equally or less effective at inhibiting the growth of certain cancer cells compared to pure CBD, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

New research reveals Australia's multi-billion dollar superbug crisis
Analysis by national consortium, OUTBREAK, highlights how urinary tract infections (UTIs) are becoming more persistent and harder to treat, resulting in more people being admitted to hospital where they require longer stays and more costly medicines.

Health systems support needed to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks in nursing homes
In ''The Pandemic Creates Urgency around Designing Health System Support Structures for Nursing Homes,'' an editorial published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Association, Kathleen Unroe, M.D., MHA, of Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine, writes that close associations between nursing homes and health systems can greatly enhance patient care and support for staff.

Newer blood thinner plus aspirin reduced stroke risk by 27% in patients with heart plaque
Patients who suffered a 'warning stroke' were less likely to have another stroke or die within 30 days if treated with a combination of aspirin and a newer blood thinner, ticagrelor.

December special issue of SLAS Discovery features 'drug discovery targeting COVID-19'
The December edition of SLAS Discovery, ''Drug Discovery Targeting COVID-19'' is a special collection assembled by Associate Editor Timothy Spicer (Scripps, FL, USA), focusing on drug discovery efforts toward the current global pandemic of COVID-19caused by the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2.

Upgraded radar can enable self-driving cars to see clearly no matter the weather
A new kind of radar could make it possible for self-driving cars to navigate safely in bad weather.

Learning a new language changes the brain's division of labor
Learning a language later in life changes how the two halves of the brain contribute.

Metal-organic frameworks become flexible
Materials consisting of inorganic and organic components can combine the best of two worlds: under certain circumstances, the so-called MOFs - short for metal-organic frameworks - are structured in the same order as crystals and are at the same time porous and deformable.

Tropical peatland conservation could protect humans from new diseases
Conservation of tropical peatlands could reduce the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the likelihood of new diseases jumping from animals to humans, researchers say.

Smartphone use offers tool to treat MS, other diseases
Monitoring how patients with multiple sclerosis or other degenerative diseases use their smartphones could provide valuable information to help get them better treatment.

A student's experience with math is affected by the composition of the group they are in
Weak students in high-performing math classes, especially boys, feel more shame compared to students in low-performing math classes.

Kids mount a COVID-19 immune response without detection of the SARSCoV- 2 virus
Children in an Australian family developed a COVID-19 immune response after chronic exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 virus from their parents, a new case report has found.

Extremely rare parasitic crustacean discovered in museum shark collection
Scientists have discovered an extremely rare species of cymothoid from the mouth of a museum specimen of a deep-sea shark caught from the East China Sea, suggesting its wide distribution around the globe.

Home oxygen therapy for adults with COPD and ILD: New ATS clinical practice guideline
The latest clinical practice guideline on home oxygen therapy addresses long-term and ambulatory oxygen therapy for adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and interstitial lung disease (ILD) and includes the most comprehensive review of the evidence of any oxygen guideline to date.

Metabolic signaling plays a crucial role in regulating specialized T cells
Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have identified how metabolic signaling pathways influence key immune cells with implications for treating autoimmune disorders and cancer.

Driver behavior influences traffic patterns as much as roadway design, study reports
Urban planners may soon have a new way to measure traffic congestion.

Common prostate cancer treatment may impair cardiorespiratory fitness, raise risk of CV death
Prolonged androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) can impair cardiorespiratory fitness and increase risk of cardiovascular death in prostate cancer patients with high risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a study in JACC: CardioOncology. The findings contribute further data supporting the need for cardiovascular disease (CVD) monitoring in patients who are living longer after successful cancer treatment.

Drug discovery: First highly scalable method to monitor protein levels and localizations
Researchers at CeMM, the Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, have developed a highly scalable method which allows for the study of hundreds of proteins in parallel in order to monitor the changes of their levels and localization in the cell.

Remotely delivered program improves blood pressure, cholesterol control in 5,000 patients
A team from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Mass General Brigham Health System, led by Brigham cardiologist Benjamin Scirica, MD, MPH, developed a program that provides an end-to-end solution to improve blood pressure and cholesterol levels across a broad population of patients at high cardiovascular risk.

Machine learning guarantees robots' performance in unknown territory
As engineers increasingly turn to machine learning methods to develop adaptable robots, new work by Princeton University researchers makes progress on safety and performance guarantees for robots operating in novel environments with diverse types of obstacles and constraints.

Like fire and ice: Why societies are increasingly fragmenting
Scientists at the Complexity Science Hub Vienna show that the accelerating fragmentation of society - often referred to as filter bubbles -- is a direct consequence of the growing number of social contacts.

Study reveals how smoking worsens COVID-19 infection in the airways
UCLA researchers using a model of airway tissue created from human stem cells have pinpointed how smoking cigarettes causes more severe infection by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in the airways of the lungs.

New diabetes medication reduced heart event risk in those with diabetes and kidney disease
Sotagliflozin - a type of medication known as an SGLT2 inhibitor primarily prescribed for Type 2 diabetes - reduces the risk of adverse cardiovascular events for patients with diabetes and kidney disease.

Study: How saliva is made
In the TV series, 'How It's Made,' viewers often discover that common objects like pencils or rubber bands are quite complicated to make.

61 healthcare groups urge Congress to support implementing the physician fee schedule
Today, more than 60 healthcare stakeholders, representing Medicare providers, signed a letter urging congressional leaders to support bipartisan legislation that would implement the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service's (CMS) Calendar Year 2021 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) final rule as written.

Duke University's aggressive COVID testing and surveillance minimized infections
An aggressive COVID-19 surveillance and testing effort at Duke University was highly effective in minimizing the spread of the disease among students on campus, according to a case study appearing Tuesday in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Healthy food labels that work and don't work
A Duke-NUS Medical School study finds that new labels may be needed to help consumers make healthier food purchases.

Immunological memory after cured Sars-CoV-2 infection
After recovery from SARS-CoV-2 infection, immune cells are formed which remain in the body and could mediate a rapid immune response in case of re-infection.

Reducing aerosol pollution without cutting carbon dioxide could make the planet hotter
Humans must reduce carbon dioxide and aerosol pollution simultaneously to avoid weakening the ocean's ability to keep the planet cool, new UC Riverside research shows.

Migrating animals 'live fast and die young'
Animals that migrate 'live fast and die young', new research shows.

Study finds some sport fish are caught repeatedly - which may throw off population count
A new study reports that, for several species of oceanic sport fish, individual fish that are caught, released and recaught are more likely to be caught again than scientists anticipated.

UCF researcher examines benefits of supportive communities for older adults
To find out just how well the aging-in-community strategy is working, a University of Central Florida health management and informatics researcher examined three aging-in-community programs in Florida.

Existing antidepressant helps to inhibit growth of cancer cells in lab animals
New research has shown that the antidepressant sertraline helps to inhibit the growth of cancer cells.

Study explores sleep apnea, autoimmune disease link
New research by University of Georgia scientists sheds light on why people with obstructive sleep apnea may have associated autoimmune disorders.

Microbial remedies target chemical threats in the environment
In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology explores new ways to rid the environment of co-occurring toxic chemicals, TCE and perchlorate.

New SARS-CoV-2 test is a simple, cost-effective, and efficient alternative for SARS-CoV-2 testing
Scientists from Northwell Health Laboratories have developed a new diagnostic multiplex assay that can be used for epidemiological surveillance and clinical management of COVID-19.

NREL advanced manufacturing research moves wind turbine blades toward recyclability
A new material for wind blades that can be recycled could transform the wind industry, rendering renewable energy more sustainable than ever before while lowering costs in the process.

Algorithm-driven digital program helped lower patients' cholesterol, blood pressure
Researchers enrolled 5,000 patients across the Mass General Brigham health system in Boston, Massachusetts in a remote, cholesterol and blood pressure management program utilizing care navigators and pharmacists, supported by specialists and using specialist-designed algorithms to initiate and adjust medications.

Promising results from in vitro combination therapy against COVID-19
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report promising results from an in vitro combination therapy against COVID-19.

Existing UV light technology has potential to reduce Covid-19 transmission indoors
A recent study has shown that a UV light technology already used to prevent the spread of other airborne diseases in buildings has the potential to be effective against Covid-19.

Time to rethink predicting pandemic infection rates?
Doubling times and exponential growth go hand in hand, so it became clear to Joseph Lee McCauley, when watching the COVID-19 rates, that modeling based on past infections is impossible, because the rate changes unforeseeably from day to day due to social distancing and lockdown efforts.

Seeking the most effective polymers for personal protective equipment
Personal protective equipment, like face masks and gowns, is generally made of polymers.

Non-hereditary mutation acts as natural gene therapy in patient with rare disease
Scientists at a research center supported by FAPESP identified a non-inherited mutation in blood cells from a patient with GATA2 deficiency that may have prevented bone marrow failure and other clinical manifestations.

Financial penalties imposed on large pharmaceutical firms for illegal activities
The UNC Charlotte study examined financial penalties imposed by government agencies using a sample of 26 large pharmaceutical firms over 13 years.

Large predatory fish thrive on WWII shipwrecks off North Carolina coast
Results of an expedition to a sunken U-boat and Nicaraguan freighter, published this week in Ecosphere, offer a detailed glimpse into unexpected ''islands of habitat.''

New study could help predict which individuals are more susceptible to cancer-causing agen
New insights into the mechanisms behind how cancer-causing agents in the environment activate genetic recombination in DNA could help to explain some of the effects of exposure as well as predicting which individuals may be more susceptible to developing the disease, a new UK study has suggested.

Mastering the art of nanoscale construction to breathe easy and bust fraud
An innovative approach to nanoscale assembly has been successfully demonstrated, with the accuracy, scalability and control required to offer new tools for chemical sensing and anti-counterfeiting.

COVID-19 patient outcomes affected by cardiovascular risk
DALLAS - Nov. 17, 2020 - Research presented today by UT Southwestern cardiologists at the annual American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2020 showed that Black and Hispanic people were more likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19 than white patients, and that nonwhite men with cardiovascular disease or risk factors were more likely to die.

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Chinese vaccine candidate based on inactivated SARS-CoV-2 virus appears safe and induces an immune response in healthy volunteers, preliminary study finds
Results from an early-phase randomised clinical trial of a Chinese vaccine candidate based on the inactivated whole SARS-CoV-2 virus (CoronaVac) are published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal, finding the formulation appears safe and induces an antibody response in healthy volunteers aged 18 to 59 years.

Normothermic Machine Perfusion (NMP) in rat livers extended from 6 to 24 hours
In a paper published in TECHNOLOGY, a team of researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have demonstrated 24-hour rat liver viability in a normothermic machine perfusion (NMP) system.

Quantifying quantumness: A mathematical project 'of immense beauty'
Large objects behave in accordance with the classical laws of mechanics formulated by Sir Isaac Newton and small ones are governed by quantum mechanics, where an object can behave as both a wave and a particle.

In a pandemic, migration away from dense cities more effective than closing borders
During the COVID-19 pandemic, closing national borders and borders between states and regions has been prevalent.

Holes in Greenland ice sheet are larger than previously thought, study finds
Expedition finds that holes in the Greenland ice sheet, called moulins, are much larger than previously thought.

December issue SLAS Technology features 'advances in technology to address COVID-19'
The December issue of SLAS Technology is a special collection featuring the cover article, ''Advances in Technology to Address COVID-19'' by editors Edward Kai-Hua Chow, Ph.D., (National University of Singapore), Pak Kin Wong, Ph.D., (The Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA) and Xianting Ding, Ph.D., (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China).

Researchers improve neuronal reprogramming by manipulating mitochondria
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig Maximilians University Munich (LMU) have identified a hurdle towards an efficient conversion: the cell metabolism.

COVID-19 cardiovascular registry details disparities among patients hospitalized with COVID
A national COVID-19 cardiovascular disease registry was established on April 3, 2020, by staff and volunteers of the American Heart Association to collect and provide generalizable insights on patients hospitalized with the novel coronavirus and to understand the impact of COVID-19 on the heart.

Oil droplet predators chase oil droplet prey
Oil droplets can be made to act like predators, chasing down other droplets that flee like prey mimicking behavior seen among living organisms.

Killing cancer naturally: New process to produce compounds with anti-cancer properties
Scientists from the Tokyo University of Science have made a breakthrough in the development of potential drugs that can kill cancer cells.

Study highlights sex-specific variability in mouse features
Scientists have shown that sex-specific differences in variability depend on individual physical and physiological features in mice, debunking competing theories that either males or females are more variable.

Childhood lead exposure leads to structural changes in middle-aged brains
More than three decades after they were found to have elevated blood lead levels as children, a group of middle-aged adults were found to have some small but significant changes in brain structure that corresponded to their dose of lead exposure in early life.

High-dose equal to standard flu vaccine for risk of death or heart, lung hospitalization
A high-dose, trivalent influenza vaccine was no more effective than the standard-dose quadrivalent vaccine at reducing the risk of death or hospitalization for heart or lung-related causes among patients with heart disease.

COVID-19 highlights risks of wildlife trade
Many diseases, such as COVID-19, made the jump from animals to people with serious consequences for the human host.

NIST sensor experts invent supercool mini thermometer
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have invented a miniature thermometer with big potential applications such as monitoring the temperature of processor chips in superconductor-based quantum computers, which must stay cold to work properly.

Pre-recorded audio messages help improve outcomes for patients with heart failure
Heart failure patients who listened to pre-recorded audio messages of support and guidance were 27% less likely to return to the emergency department one-month after discharge.

AI tool may predict movies' future ratings
Researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, armed with artificial intelligence tools, can rate a movie's content in a matter of seconds, based on the movie script and before a single scene is shot.

Farms, tables and vast impacts between and beyond
New sustainability science tools show places that have no major stake in the plant-water-eat game end up paying an environmental price.

Teaching and complex tools 'evolved together'
The human ability to teach and our use of complex tools may have evolved together, according to new research.

Environmental scientists' new ozonation method treats water from antibiotic residues
Clean drinking water is considered to be one of the earth's most precious and threatened resources.

UV light may be a greater risk for melanoma than suspected
Studies conducted in yeast show that exposure to ultraviolet light (UV) induces new types of DNA damage that may cause the deadliest form of skin cancer, malignant melanoma.

Report: In retrospect, the burning of wood in district heating plants has resulted in climate saving
A new report from the University of Copenhagen shows that the burning of wood is significantly more climate friendly than coal and slightly more climate friendly than natural gas over the long run.

Racket sports may worsen knee arthritis
Racket sports like tennis and racquetball appear to accelerate knee joint degeneration in overweight people with osteoarthritis, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Study: Jumps in elementary school violence linked to increased student transfers
New research finds that student exposure to violent crime in urban elementary schools is linked to higher transfer rates, with students ineligible for free- or reduced-price meals and students from safer neighborhoods more likely to leave than their less advantaged peers.

'Extremely aggressive' internet censorship spreads in the world's democracies
The largest collection of public internet censorship data ever compiled shows that even citizens of what are considered the world's freest countries aren't safe from internet censorship.

Breakthrough in childhood brain cancer will save lives
A scientific breakthrough has enabled experts to predict relapse in a common childhood cancer and means doctors can tailor treatment for each individual child and improve prognosis.

Why untraceable cryptocurrencies are here to stay
Financial regulators have a wait and see approach to decentralized privacy-preserving cryptocurrencies, letting them mature before deciding how to regulate them.

NASA model reveals how much COVID-related pollution levels deviated from the norm
Using computer models to generate a COVID-free 2020 for comparison, NASA researchers found that since February, pandemic restrictions have reduced global nitrogen dioxide concentrations by nearly 20%.

Blacks, Hispanics comprised more than half of all inpatient deaths from COVID-19
More than half of all in-hospital deaths due to COVID-19 during the first six months of 2020 were among Black and Hispanic patients, according to a new study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Duke University.

Patient engagement program for heart failure patients improved outcomes
Nearly half of patients who received support through a patient engagement tool prior to a cardiology clinic visit had a positive change in their medication therapy compared to less than a third among patients who did not receive the engagement tool.

Are e-cigarette users at greater risk of poor immune response to flu, COVID?
In a controlled study of smokers, nonsmokers, and e-cigarette users, University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers found that e-cigarette users exhibited significantly altered immune responses to a model of influenza virus infection, suggesting increased susceptibility to disease, including possibly COVID-19.

Just hours of training triples doctor confidence in use of handheld ultrasound devices
Filling a training gap, a Penn Medicine doctor created a geriatric medicine-centered course for point-of-care-ultrasound (POCUS) devices that doubled doctor confidence.

Palladium, meet copper: Skoltech researchers use machine learning to improve catalysts
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Germany and the US have studied the properties and behavior of a palladium-copper alloy under changing temperatures and hydrogen concentrations, with highly relevant implications of this research for catalyst design.

Carbyne - an unusual form of carbon
Which photophysical properties does carbyne have? This was the subject of research carried out by scientists at FAU, the University of Alberta, Canada, and the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland, which has led to a greater understanding of the properties of this unusual form of carbon.

Birds of a feather do flock together
Researchers explain how different species of the finch-like capuchino seedeaters quickly acquired distinct patterns of coloration over an evolutionary time scale.

People who purchased firearms during pandemic more likely to be suicidal
People who purchase a firearm during the pandemic are more likely to be suicidal than other firearm owners, according to a Rutgers study.

Ethnic minorities face rising disparity in homicide risk across England and Wales
Calculations now familiar from coronavirus coverage - cases per 100,000 people - applied to ethnicity and homicide victimisation in the UK for the first time.

New protein imaging method paves way for next generation biomaterials and tissue analysis
Scientists have established a new method to image proteins that could lead to new discoveries in disease through biological tissue and cell analysis and the development of new biomaterials that can be used for the next generation of drug delivery systems and medical devices.

Potential cholera vaccine target discovered
Investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital analyzed antibodies recovered from humans who survived cholera.

Potential therapeutic strategy for obesity
Together with researchers from Poland, Germany, Australia and Austria, a team of MedUni Vienna scientists has now discovered the signalling pathways responsible for the development of a valuable type of adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) in obesity, which prevents lipotoxicity.

Ancient zircon minerals from Mars reveal the elusive internal structure of the red planet
Analysis of an ancient meteorite from Mars suggests that the mineral zircon may be abundant on the surface of the red planet.

Spintronics advances -- Controlling magnetization direction of magnetite at room temperature
Spintronics--based on the principles of electron charge and magnetic spin--goes beyond the limits of conventional electronics.

A patented solution for dry mouth relief and food product development
A team of scientists from the University of Leeds have developed a new hydrogel that has significant potential for oral care products that can help with dry mouth relief.

Despite industry wariness, stress tests found to strengthen banks of all sizes
Despite additional costs, increased restrictions, and issues stemming from compliance directives, research recently published by Raffi E.

Comprehensive safety testing of COVID-19 vaccines based on experience with prior vaccines
'The urgent need for COVID-19 vaccines must be balanced with the imperative of ensuring safety and public confidence in vaccines by following the established clinical safety testing protocols throughout vaccine development, including both pre- and post-deployment,' write David M.

The long road to dementia
Alzheimer's disease develops over decades. It begins with a fatal chain reaction in which masses of misfolded beta-amyloid proteins are produced that in the end literally flood the brain.

An acebuchin-oil-enriched diet helps to reduce hypertension
The acebuche, also know as the wild olive tree, is a variety of tree widely found throughout Spain and covering almost nine million hectares in Andalusia.

Motor neural population activity patterns are different for reach and grasp behaviors
A new study from researchers at the University of Chicago has found that neuronal population dynamics in the motor cortex are very different during reaching and grasping behavior, challenging a popular theory that indicated intrinsic, dynamic patterns control motor behaviors.

'Meet people where they are:' local health departments key to hepatitis B vaccination
A study led by Stacy Tressler--who earned her doctorate in epidemiology from the West Virginia University School of Public Health--suggests that local health departments are vital to getting the hepatitis B vaccine to the people who need it most.

Americans' attitudes about guns influenced by owners' race and gender
A new study from researchers at Rice University found that Americans' attitudes about gun ownership are impacted by the gender and race of firearms' potential owners.

Study improves ability to predict how whales travel through their ocean habitat
Scientists at the New England Aquarium's Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life recently published a study that could help researchers learn where protections are needed the most for bowhead whales.

Abundance of prey species is key to bird diversity in cities
A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and the Technische Universität Berlin (TUB) collaborated to analyse breeding bird data from the Senate of Berlin gathered by citizen scientists.

Records from six growth studies analyzed to provide milestone data
For the first time ever, craniofacial growth in children can be studied comprehensively using data from six historic adolescent growth studies.

X-ray imaging of a beetle's world in ancient earthenware
Using X-rays, Professor Hiroki Obata of Kumamoto University, Japan has imaged 28 impressions of maize weevils on pottery shards from the late Jomon period (around 3,600 years ago) excavated from the Yakushoden site in Miyazaki Prefecture.

Retinas: New potential clues in diagnosing, treating Alzheimer's
A study led by the Cedars-Sinai Department of Neurosurgery has identified certain regions in the retina - the lining found in the back of the eye - that are more affected by Alzheimer's disease than other areas.

A study analyses what leads US citizens to support intervention abroad
Researchers at UPF and at the Catholic University of Leuven have studied the different motivations and ways whereby the US intervenes in other countries to promote democracy, such as foreign aid, economic sanctions and military intervention.

Piecing together the Alaska coastline's fractured volcanic activity
Among seismologists, the geology of Alaska's earthquake- and volcano-rich coast from the Aleutian Islands to the southeast is fascinating, but not well understood.

Relaxing cell divisions
During one lifetime, the human body experiences ten quadrillion cell divisions.

Toolkit to engage patients and families significantly reduced falls and injuries
Brigham investigators found that a program they developed, which focused on tools that engage patients and families in the fall prevention process throughout hospitalization, was associated with significantly reduced falls and fall-related injuries at three different hospitals.

Revealing the unexpected structure of iron-exporter ferroportin
The 3D structure of a mammalian ferroportin reveals unexpected characteristics and a mode of action that could lead to innovative therapies.

Small differences, big impact
In a new study, researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have identified a handful of variations in an amino acid sequence critical for retaining the ancestral function of a gene over the course of 600 million years of evolution.

New analysis refutes claim that dinosaurs were in decline before asteroid hit
New research suggests that dinosaurs were not in decline before the asteroid hit.

Study of non-COVID-19 deaths shows 2020 increase in several demographics
March through May saw a significant increase in deaths over previous years - and not just from COVID-19, says a new study from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Could your vacuum be listening to you?
A team of researchers demonstrated that popular robotic household vacuum cleaners can be remotely hacked to act as microphones.

Blood biomarkers for detecting brain injury in COVID-19 patients
COVID-19 can directly cause neurologic symptoms and long-term neurological disease.

Scientists defy nature to make insta-bling at room temperature
An international team of scientists has defied nature to make diamonds in minutes in a laboratory at room temperature - a process that normally requires billions of years, huge amounts of pressure and super-hot temperatures.

Loneliness in Parkinson's disease may lead to worsening of symptoms
Research from UCLA scientists and colleagues from other institutions finds that people with Parkinson's disease who lack meaningful social interactions may be at an increased risk for severe symptoms related to the disease.

A new understanding of ionic interactions with graphene and water
The findings from Northwestern University and Argonne National Laboratory researchers could inform design of environmental technologies behind water purification processes and electric energy storage.

Community helps scientists evaluate smoke forecasts
Across the Wasatch Front, both researchers and community members maintain enough air quality sensors to provide a high-resolution picture of how the smoke moved through the valley--perfect for testing and refining smoke forecast models.

NIH gene therapy startup to increase AAV gene therapy efficiency
Maximizing the efficiency of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) platform for gene therapy is the aim of a new pilot project of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
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