Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 19, 2020
Afro-Caribbean patients with severe kidney disease at greater risk of hospitalisation from COVID-19
Afro-Caribbean people with end stage kidney disease (ESKD) are more likely to be hospitalised with COVID-19 than other ethnicities, a study has found.

Breathing problems in teens: COVID-19 or lung injury due to vaping?
In a case series of three teen patients, UC Davis Health pediatricians present common manifestations of COVID-19 and lung injury due to vaping (EVALI).

Mediterranean diet tied to 30 percent risk reduction for diabetes in Women's Health Study
In a paper published in JAMA Network Open, Brigham investigators report that women who adhered to a more Mediterranean-like diet had a 30 percent lower rate of type 2 diabetes than women who did not.

COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness to be affected heavily by infrastructure, public attitudes
The success of a COVID-19 vaccine will depend not only on its efficacy, but will hinge at least as much on how fast and widely it can be delivered, the severity of the pandemic, and the public's willingness to be immunized, according to a study published in Health Affairs.

Scientists age quantum dots in a test tube
Researchers from MIPT and the RAS Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics have proposed a simple and convenient way to obtain arbitrarily sized quantum dots required for physical experiments via chemical aging.

Food, housing insecurities may delay breast cancer diagnosis
Women who experience food or housing insecurity may be at risk for undiagnosed breast cancer due to lapses in follow-up appointments, according to research being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Gut microbiome link to deadly lung disease
Research led by the Centenary Institute, the University of Technology Sydney and the University of Queensland has shown for the first time a link between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), an often fatal lung condition, and the gut microbiome.

More than 1.1 million deaths among Medicare recipients due to high cost of drugs
WASHINGTON, DC and SAN DIEGO, CA - Nov. 19, 2020 - More than 1.1 million Medicare patients could die over the next decade because they cannot afford to pay for their prescription medications, according to a new study released today by the West Health Policy Center, a nonprofit and nonpartisan policy research group and Xcenda, the research arm of the drug distributor AmerisourceBergen.

Researchers peer inside deadly pathogen's burglary kit
The bacterium that causes the tick-borne disease tularemia is a lean, mean infecting machine.

Implantation of an S-ICD in a patient with a DDD pacemaker and congenitally corrected transposition
Implantation of an S-ICD in a Patient with a DDD Pacemaker and Congenitally Corrected Transposition of the Great Arteries.

Building a better electronic touch
Two new studies introduce materials that improve the capabilities of electronic 'touch,' boosting the multimodality of artificial skin so that it more resembles the capabilities of human skin.

The first battle for oil in Norway
The world's richest man and the world's largest oil company dominated the petroleum market in Norway long before landmark finds on the Norwegian continental shelf and the Norwegian oil fund.

Inclusion is key for all to thrive throughout life, report says
When it comes to optimizing 'longevity fitness' through attention to social, health, and wealth aspects of life, many Americans face intractable inequities based on the color of their skin, where they live, their sex, and who they love.

Palaeontologists describe a unique preservation process analyzing remains found in amber
A team of palaeontologists described two amber pieces found in sites in Teruel (Spain) with remains from vertebrates corresponding to the Early Cretaceous.

Synthesis study demonstrates phytoplankton can bloom below Arctic sea ice
Researchers used historical scientific studies, along with contemporary observations employing autonomous floats and robotic vehicles, to demonstrate that phytoplankton blooms occur under Arctic Ocean sea ice.

Researchers recommend more transparency for gene-edited crops
To gain trust, NC State researchers recommend a wide-ranging coalition that would provide more transparency on the presence and use of gene editing in food supplies.

The Lancet: Phase 2 trial of Oxford COVID-19 vaccine in healthy older adults finds it is safe and provokes immune response
The UK's vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 shows similar safety and immunogenicity results in healthy older adults (aged 56 years and over) to those seen in adults aged 18-55 years.

A measure of smell
Meeting a 100-year-old challenge could lead the way to digital aromas

Blue whales return to South Georgia after near extinction
An international research team led by UK scientists has revealed the return of critically endangered Antarctic blue whales to the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia, 50 years after whaling all but wiped them out.

Predicting forces between oddly shaped nanoparticles
Materials scientists at Duke University have devised a simplified method for calculating the forces that cause nanoparticles to self-assemble.

Potential new target to combat inflammatory diseases
An international team of researchers have uncovered a drug-like compound that blocks a crucial inflammatory pathway, potentially paving the way for a new treatment for a host of diseases - including COVID-19.

Do meal kits tick right boxes?
During the pandemic, handy meal kit delivery services are helping to develop home cooking habits incorporating healthy ingredients such as vegetables, and a balance of less harmful fats and salt.

Understanding lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis
For young people with cystic fibrosis, lung infection with Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, is common and is treated with antibiotics in the hope that this will prevent a decline in lung function.

Experts issue recommendations for equitable distribution of COVID-19 vaccine
A group of vaccine experts led by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has published recommendations to ensure equitable distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available.

Simple measurement could transform injury rehabilitation
Researchers from Edith Cowan University in Western Australia have found a simple way to analyse the effectiveness of exercise training that could one day be conducted easily at a local gym or physio.

New process narrows the gap between natural and synthetic materials
Skin and cartilage are both strong and flexible - properties that are hard to replicate in artificial materials.

A novel drug target for neonatal and infant heart failure
Researchers have identified a new druggable target for heart failure in neonates and infants.

Scientists discover roles for a cellular motor in cancer
Utah scientists have discovered new functions of a key cellular machine that regulates gene packaging and is mutated in 20% of human cancers.

Climate change and 'atmospheric thirst' to increase fire danger and drought in NV and CA
Climate change and a ''thirsty atmosphere'' will bring more extreme wildfire danger and multi-year droughts to Nevada and California by the end of this century, according to new research from the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, and the University of California, Merced.

Mediastinal tuberculoma mimicking malignant cardiac tumor
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0587, Yiqian Ding, Wei Li, Yanqiu Liu, Min Ye, Liangping Cheng, Donghong Liu, Hong Lin and Fengjuan Yao from The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China consider mediastinal tuberculoma mimicking malignant cardiac tumors.

New tool to combat terrorism
Forensic science experts at Flinders University are refining an innovative counter-terrorism technique that checks for environmental DNA in the dust on clothing, baggage, shoes or even a passport.

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 via pork meat unlikely according to current state of knowledge
State media in China have claimed that a worker has become infected with the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) from a knuckle of pork imported from Germany.

Archaeology: Transition to feudal living in 14th century impacted local ecosystems
The transition from tribal to feudal living, which occurred throughout the 14th century in Lagow, Poland had a significant impact on the local ecosystem, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.

Can animals use iridescent colours to communicate?
New paper sheds light on the colourful world of animal communication, highlighting the challenges of studying accurately how iridescent colours work in nature

Study of 'exceptional responders' yields clues to cancer and potential treatments
In a comprehensive analysis of patients with cancer who had exceptional responses to therapy, researchers have identified molecular changes in the patients' tumors that may explain some of the exceptional responses.

Cesarean section-born children may face higher risk of infection-related hospitalization
Children born via cesarean section may be more likely to be hospitalized for infection during early childhood.

Study finds low risk of pregnancy complications from COVID-19
Pregnant women who test positive for COVID-19 and their newborn babies have a low risk of developing severe symptoms, according to a new study from UT Southwestern.

A gene mutation that protects against disease
Called PCSK9Q152H, the mutation of the PCSK9 gene was initially thought to protect against cardiovascular diseases.

Study: Texas program successful in increasing private donations to public universities
A new study suggests that the Texas Research Incentive Program (TRIP) has succeeded in boosting the amount of private donations to public universities, indicating that policymakers can effectively leverage public investment to spur private donations.

A pressure sensor at your fingertips
Researchers have developed an ultrathin pressure sensor that can be attached directly to the skin.

Artificial intelligence & satellite technologies reveal detailed map of air pollution across UK
A novel method that combines artificial intelligence with remote sensing satellite technologies has produced the most detailed coverage of air pollution in Britain to date.

Study of hope and optimism: New paper examines research in emerging fields
A new paper published by the John Templeton Foundation explores the latest scientific and philosophical research on the related but distinct virtues of hope and optimism.

Being alone and socializing with others each contributes differently to personal growth
Researchers from Bar-Ilan University analyzed self-generated text from more than 1,700 participants who performed a sentence-completion task regarding their experience alone and their social experience when in the company of others.

Antimicrobial peptides with anticancer properties
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this article the authors Zhong, Cuiyu; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Jiandong; Huang, Songyin; Yao, Yandan from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China; Guangzhou Regenerative Medicine and Health Guangdong Laboratory, Guangzhou, China and Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Guangdong, China review antimicrobial peptides with anticancer properties.

Greater mosquito susceptibility to Zika virus fueled the epidemic
By experimentally comparing wild populations of Ae. aegypti the researchers discovered that the invasive subspecies is very effective at transmitting the Zika virus not only because it has more frequent contacts with humans for blood meals, but also as a result of its greater susceptibility to the virus relative to the African subspecies.

Maraxilibat reduces debilitating itching in children with Alagille syndrome
On behalf of Childhood Liver Disease Research Network (ChiLDReN), Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine researchers report that prolonged treatment with Maraxilibat resulted in clinically meaningful improvements in debilitating itching (pruritus) and related quality of life outcomes in children with Alagille syndrome.

Bed dust microorganisms may boost children's health
In the most extensive study of its kind, researchers from the University of Copenhagen, in collaboration with the Danish Pediatric Asthma Center at Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, have found a link between microorganisms living in the dust of children's beds and the children's own bacteria.

Giant aquatic bacterium is a master of adaptation
The largest freshwater bacterium, Achromatium oxaliferum, is highly flexible in its requirements, as researchers led by the IGB have now discovered: It lives in places that differ extremely in environmental conditions such as hot springs and ice water.

Antibody cocktails at low doses could be more effective at treating COVID-19
Pairs of antibodies may be more effective than single antibodies at preventing and treating COVID-19, according to a new study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and The Rockefeller University in New York.

Insights in the search for new antibiotics
A collaborative research team from the University of Oklahoma, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Merck & Co. published an opinion article in the journal, Nature Chemical Biology, that addresses the gap in the discovery of new antibiotics.

Could kelp help relieve ocean acidification?
A new analysis of California's Monterey Bay evaluates kelp's potential to reduce ocean acidification, the harmful fallout from climate change on marine ecosystems and the food they produce for human populations.

UCF researchers identify features that could make someone a virus super-spreader
In a study in Physics of Fluids, UCF researchers used computer-generated models to numerically simulate sneezes in different types of people and determine associations between people's physiological features and how far their sneeze droplets travel and linger in the air.

A meta-analysis of major complications between traditional pacemakers and leadless pacemakers
A Meta-analysis of Major Complications between Traditional Pacemakers and Leadless Pacemakers.

An INRS research team pushes back the boundaries of high-energy laser pulses
Using the Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS) facility, the research team of Professor François Légaré of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has pushed back the boundaries of high-energy pulse propagation in a nonlinear medium through the observation of high-energy multidimensional solitary states (MDSS).

One in four older refugees are in psychological distress -- even decades after resettlement
A new study of Canadians aged 45-85, released this week in the International Journal of Social Psychiatry, found that 24% of refugees were in psychological distress compared to 13% of non-refugee immigrants and those born in Canada.

Taking out the trash is essential for brain health
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have identified a protein called Wipi3 that is essential for cellular waste disposal via the alternative autophagy system.

Two liquids of water exist
Using x-ray lasers, researchers at Stockholm University have been able to follow the transformation between two distinct different liquid states of water, both being made of H2O molecules.

Analysis of the relations between Spanish civil society organizations and science
Researchers at UPF have analysed the relationship between civil society organizations and the Spanish science and technology system.

Drug eases recovery for those with severe alcohol withdrawal
Yale scientists say a drug originally developed to treat high blood pressure can reduce severe withdrawal symptoms for patients diagnosed with alcohol use disorder.

Green hydrogen: Buoyancy-driven convection in the electrolyte
Hydrogen produced by using solar energy could contribute to a climate neutral energy system of the future.

Study shows delirium can signal presence of COVID-19 in asymptomatic older patients in ED
A study published today in JAMA Network Open/Emergency Medicine supports evidence that older persons admitted to emergency departments (ED), and subsequently diagnosed positive for COVID-19, often present with delirium when they show no other typical COVID-19 symptoms, such as fever and cough.

CLCN6 identified as disease gene for a severe form of lysosomal neurodegenerative disease
A mutation in the CLCN6 gene is associated with a novel, particularly severe neurodegenerative disorder.

Three reasons why COVID-19 can cause silent hypoxia
To crack the mystery of what causes silent hypoxia, a condition when oxygen levels in the body are abnormally low, BU biomedical engineers used computer modeling to test out three different scenarios that help explain how and why the lungs stop providing oxygen to the bloodstream.

WHO Guideline Development Group advises against use of remdesivir for covid-19
The antiviral drug remdesivir is not suggested for patients admitted to hospital with covid-19, regardless of how severely ill they are, because there is currently no evidence that it improves survival or the need for ventilation, say a WHO Guideline Development Group (GDG) panel of international experts in The BMJ today.

A filter for environmental remediation
Scientists at Osaka University discovered a new method for producing sodium titanate mats nanostructured in a seaweed-like morphology for filtering heavy metal ions and radioactive materials from water.

The very hungry, angry caterpillars
In the absence of milkweed--their favorite food--monarch butterfly caterpillars (Danaus plexippus) go from peaceful feeders to aggressive fighters.

Increasing diversity and community participation in environmental engineering
Black, Hispanic, and Native American students and faculty are largely underrepresented in environmental engineering programs in the ) States.

Insights on a mechanism to stop COVID-19 replication
Stopping the replication of SARS-CoV-2 is likely possible thanks to a compound called EBSELEN: a group of researchers from the Politecnico di Milano has communicated aspects relevant to the blocking of replication mechanism in the New Journal of Chemistry.

Nonlinear ionization dynamics of hot dense plasma observed in a laser-plasma amplifier
Understanding the behavior of light-matter interaction under extreme conditions, such as in high-density plasmas, is important for our identification of cosmologic objects and the formation of the universe.

How the flu virus spreads within cities
New insights into the local transmission of seasonal influenza may be valuable for planning interventions to combat the spread of respiratory diseases within cities, according to a study published November 19, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Nicola Müller and Tanja Stadler of ETH Zürich, and colleagues.

College students are less food insecure than non-students
College students are significantly less likely to be food insecure than non-students in the same age group, according to a new study from the University of Illinois.

Commentary: Want to understand health disparities? Get your antiracist goggles on
How do we shrink persistent racial health disparities, especially among children?

The secret social lives of giant poisonous rats
The African crested rat is the only mammal known to sequester plant toxins for chemical defense.

Pregnancy outcomes among women with, without SARS-CoV-2 infection
A large, single-institution observational study suggests SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy wasn't associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Evaluation of tracheal complications in patients with COVID-19
Whether patients with COVID-19 had higher risk of tracheal complications after prolonged invasive mechanical ventilation and the possible reasons why were investigated in this study.

Cesarean-born babies at increased risk of infection-related hospitalisation in childhood
Cesarean-born babies are at increased risk during early childhood of being hospitalised due to an infection, according to a new study of over seven million births from four countries.

Social isolation during COVID-19 pandemic linked with high blood pressure
Lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with an increase in high blood pressure among patients admitted to emergency.

Frozen eggs and ovarian tissue helped women conceive children after breast cancer
Women with breast cancer whose eggs or ovarian tissue were frozen had more children after their diagnosis than women who did not undergo fertility preservation using those methods before start of cancer treatment.

Loneliness in youth could impact mental health over the long term
The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated widespread social isolation, affecting all ages of global society.

Confirming simulated calculations with experiment results
Dr Zi Yang MENG from Division of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Science, the University of Hong Kong (HKU), is pursuing a new paradigm of quantum material research that combines theory, computation and experiment in a coherent manner.

Mystery solved: a 'New Kind of Electrons'
Why do certain materials emit electrons with a very specific energy?

Risk of target organ damage in patients with masked hypertension versus sustained hypertension
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1261, Yue Wu, Guoyue Zhang, Rong Hu and Jianlin Du from The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China consider the risk of target organ damage in patients with masked hypertension versus sustained hypertension.

A case of pediatric heart failure caused by anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0585, Lei Zhang, Tiewei Lv, Xiaoyan Liu, Chuan Feng, Min Zheng, Jie Tian and Huichao Sun from the Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China and the Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics, Chongqing, China consider a case of pediatric heart failure caused by anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery.

Stem cell transplantation: undesirable rejection mechanism identified
In the treatment of leukaemia, stem cell transplantation subsequent to chemotherapy and radiation can often engender severe adverse inflammatory reactions - especially in the skin or in the gut, since these so-called barrier organs are more frequently affected.

VLA sky survey reveals newborn jets in distant galaxies
Comparing data from VLA sky surveys made some two decades apart revealed that the black hole-powered 'engines' at the cores of some distant galaxies have launched new, superfast jets of material during the interval between the surveys.

Can eating mangoes reduce women's facial wrinkles?
A new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis, finds eating Ataulfo mangoes, also known as honey or Champagne mangoes, may reduce facial wrinkles in older women with fairer skin.

A bypass route for the coronary vessels in the heart?
When the heart develops, some of its coronary blood vessels develop from cells lining the inner surface of the heart's ventricular chambers (endocardium).

Eye protection for patients with COVID-19 undergoing prolonged prone-position ventilation
Researchers report two cases of ophthalmic clinical examination findings in patients who underwent prolonged prone positioning in the intensive care unit during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Showing robots how to drive a car...in just a few easy lessons
USC researchers have designed a system that lets robots autonomously learn complicated tasks from a very small number of demonstrations--even imperfect ones.

Tel Aviv University study finds hyperbaric oxygen treatments reverse aging process
A new study from Tel Aviv University (TAU) and the Shamir Medical Center in Israel indicates that hyperbaric oxygen treatments (HBOT) in healthy aging adults can stop the aging of blood cells and reverse the aging process.

Researchers create first map of bee species around the globe
There are over 20,000 species of bee, but accurate data about how these species are spread across the globe are sparse.

Army, MIT explore materials for transforming robots made of robots
Scientists from the US Army and MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms created a new way to link materials with unique mechanical properties, opening up the possibility of future military robots made of robots.

Vibrations of coronavirus proteins may play a role in infection
MIT research finds vibrations of the protein spikes on coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2, play a crucial part in allowing the virus to penetrate human cells.

A neural network learns when it should not be trusted
MIT researchers have developed a way for deep learning neural networks to rapidly estimate confidence levels in their output.

Importance of mitochondrial-related genes in dilated cardiomyopathy
Importance of Mitochondrial-Related Genes in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Based on Bioinformatics Analysis.

Building better diffusion models for active systems
Research published in EPJ E has led to new theories detailing how some unusual diffusion behaviours can be reproduced in generalised mathematical models.

RIT students discover hidden 15th-century text on medieval manuscripts
Rochester Institute of Technology students discovered lost text on 15th-century manuscript leaves using an imaging system they developed as freshmen.

The Lancet Microbe: Infectiousness peaks early in COVID-19 patients, emphasising the need to rapidly isolate cases
Although SARS-CoV-2 genetic material may still be detected in respiratory or stool samples for several weeks, no live virus (that can cause infection) was found in any type of sample collected beyond nine days of symptoms starting and people with SARS-CoV-2 are mostly likely to be highly infectious from symptom onset and the following five days, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis of three human coronaviruses published in The Lancet Microbe journal.

Truffle munching wallabies shed new light on forest conservation
A researcher from Edith Cowan University in Western Australia led an investigation into how swamp wallabies spread truffle spores around the environment.

Very hungry and angry, caterpillars head-butt to get what they want
When food is scarce, monarch butterfly caterpillars go from docile to domineering.

Children's Hospital Los Angeles conducts largest pediatric genomic COVID-19 study to date
Scientists at Children's Hospital Los Angeles analyze the largest group of genetically-sequenced Sars-CoV-2 samples to date.

Incretin hormone levels linked to arteriosclerosis
Diabetes is currently treated using incretin hormones to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and other medical issues that the illness can trigger.

DeepER tool uses deep learning to better allocate emergency services
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York has used deep-learning techniques to analyze statistics on emergencies in NYC to suggest improved public safety through re-allocation of resources.

Engineered immune cells elicit broad response to HIV in mice, offering hope for vaccine
Unlike so many other deadly viruses, HIV still lacks a vaccine.

Long-acting antipsychotic therapy plus cognitive training show promise for schizophrenia
UCLA scientists and colleagues found the use of long-acting antipsychotic medication combined with the use of cognitive training in group settings led to improved cognition and increased productivity.

Delirium in older patients with COVID-19
How frequently older adults with COVID-19 present to the emergency department with delirium was examined in this observational study.

Elephant genetics guide conservation
A large-scale study of African elephant genetics in Tanzania reveals the history of elephant populations, how they interact, and what areas may be critical to conserve in order to preserve genetic diversity of the species.

In-stent thrombosis after antiplatelet therapy conversion while awaiting coronary bypass
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0589, Nathan Burke, Tawanna Charlton, Hussam Hawamdeh, and Ki Park from the University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, USA consider a case study of in-stent thrombosis after antiplatelet therapy conversion while awaiting coronary bypass.

Virtual reality helps measure vulnerability to stress
Behavioral scientists at EPFL have developed a virtual reality test that assesses a person's vulnerability to stress while exploring immersive environments.

New effective and safe antifungal isolated from sea squirt microbiome
By combing the ocean for antimicrobials, scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have discovered a new antifungal compound that efficiently targets multi-drug-resistant strains of deadly fungi without toxic side effects in mice.

Molecular telegraphy: precisely sending and receiving single molecules
Researchers of the University of Graz, Austria, managed to send single molecules to a distant location and receive them from there.

Climate warming increases infectious disease risk in cooler-climate species
Accelerated climate warming may increase the risk for infectious disease outbreaks in many species adapted to mild and cooler climates, whereas species from warmer climates could experience reductions in disease risk, reports a new study.

Marine bacterium yields promising new antifungal
A molecule extracted from a bacterium living inside a sea squirt acts as a potent antifungal, even against multidrug-resistant fungal pathogens such as Candida auris, according to Fan Zhang and colleagues.

Researchers prove water has multiple liquid states
When water reaches approximately -63 degrees centigrade it can separate into two liquid states, with one liquid being 20% more dense than the other.

How rotavirus causes severe gastrointestinal disease
Using intercellular calcium waves, rotavirus amplifies its ability to cause disease beyond the cells it directly infects.

Breaking the power and speed limit of lasers
Researchers at the George Washington University have developed a new design of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) that demonstrates record-fast temporal bandwidth.

'Domestication' increases mosquito's zika virus susceptibility
The Aedes aegypti aegypti subspecies of mosquito, which has become a ''domestic'' pest worldwide, can acquire and transmit Zika virus more easily than its African forerunner.

Spill-over effects show prioritising education of very poorest improves attainment of all
International development projects that target the education of the world's very poorest children also significantly improve other young people's attainment, University of Cambridge research indicates.

Predicting preterm births
Researchers studied how family history can predict preterm birth.

WeChat group of chest pain center for patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0590, Liu Yue, Qin Zhu-Yun, Yang Xin, Tang Rong and Gao Ling-Yun from the The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China consider the use of a social media platform (WeChat) to provide faster treatment and improve prognoses for a group of patients with acute ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

Changes in vaping, other substance use, another side effect of COVID-19
Before the COVID-19 pandemic, information about the dangers of vaping was emerging.

The challenges of treating acute myocardial infarction due to variant angina
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1262, Wen-Yuan Ding, Jia-Min Li, Fei Zheng, Li-Li Wang, Xin-Yi Wei and Guo-Hua Li from Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Ji'nan, China, Affiliated Hospital of Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Ji'nan, China and Shandong First Medical University, Tai'an, China consider the challenges of treating acute myocardial infarction due to variant angina.
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