Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 23, 2020
Minimizing the impact of restaurant shutdowns, restrictions in china amid COVID-19 crisis
A new study led by the UH Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management identifies aspects of restaurant operations in China that benefitted the bottom line despite the turmoil caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Ancient people relied on coastal environments to survive the Last Glacial Maximum
Excavations on the south coast of South Africa have uncovered evidence of human occupations from the end of the last ice age, approximately 35,000 years ago, through the complex transition to the modern time, known as the Holocene and adaptions that were key to our species ability to survive wide climate and environmental fluctuations.

Some parents prioritize Thanksgiving traditions over reducing COVID-19 risks
One in three parents say the benefits of gathering with family for the holidays are worth the risk of spreading or getting the virus, according to the C.S.

Medicaid expansion may result in earlier diagnosis of colon cancer
The Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion for low-income people appears to lead to earlier diagnosis of colon cancer, enhanced access to care, and improved surgical care for patients with this common cancer.

Perfect imperfection: Electrode defects boost resistive memory efficiency
Resistive switching memory devices offer several advantages over the currently used computer memory technology.

Identical evolution of isolated organisms
Palaeontologists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and the University of Calgary in Canada have provided new proof of parallel evolution: conodonts, early vertebrates from the Permian period, adapted to new habitats in almost identical ways despite living in different geographical regions.

Boosting stem cell activity can enhance immunotherapy benefits
Immune-system T cells have been reprogrammed into regenerative stem cell-like memory (TSCM) cells that are long-lived, highly active ''super immune cells'' with strong antitumor activity, according to new research from Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Strain engineering of 2D semiconductor and graphene
Strain engineering can significantly manipulate the two-dimensional (2D) materials' electronic and optical properties, which endow it the potential applications in optoelectronics and nanophotonics.

Social needs linked to low health-related quality of life among African American cancer survivors
Social needs--such as food and economic insecurity, poor housing and neighborhood conditions, and lack of access to transportation--were common in a group of African American cancer survivors in Detroit, and they were associated with lower health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Eye exam could lead to early Parkinson's disease diagnosis
A simple eye exam combined with powerful artificial intelligence (AI) machine learning technology could provide early detection of Parkinson's disease, according to research being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Using strain to control oxynitride properties
Japanese scientists have stumbled onto a simple method for controlling the introduction of defects, called 'vacancy layers', into perovskite oxynitrides, leading to changes in their physical properties.

Magnetic brain waves to detect injury and disease
Researchers have designed a new Optically Pumped Magnetometer (OPM) sensor for magnetoencephalography (MEG).

Newfound ability to change baby brain activity could lead to rehabilitation for injured brains
Researchers from King's College London have identified the brain activity for the first time in a newborn baby when they are learning an association between different types of sensory experiences.

Hot spots identified for colorectal cancer mortality rates among young women
Women diagnosed with early-onset colorectal cancer have a greater risk of dying from the disease depending upon their county of residence, according to a study published in Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology.

Climate change presents new challenges for the drinking water supply
Rising temperatures in Germany's largest drinking water reservoir present new challenges for the drinking water supply.

Proving viability of injection-free microneedle for single-administration of vaccines
A single-use, self-administered microneedle technology developed by UConn faculty to provide immunization against infectious diseases has recently been validated by preclinical research trials.

Understanding dangerous droplet dynamics
New fluid dynamics research reveals why social distancing alone doesn't necessarily prevent infection indoors and how to detect COVID-19 super-spreaders.

Understanding frustration could lead to better drugs
Atom-scale models of proteins that incorporate ligands, like drug molecules, shows a strong correlation between minimally frustrated binding sites and drug specificity.

What do slight arm movements reveal about our breathing and health?
Special activity trackers can be used to fairly accurately determine the respiratory rate of people while they sleep.

Researchers use cutting edge technology to bioprint mini-kidneys
Researchers have used cutting edge technology to bioprint miniature human kidneys in the lab, paving the way for new treatments for kidney failure and possibly lab-grown transplants.

Moths strike out in evolutionary arms race with sophisticated wing design
Ultra-thin, super-absorbent and extraordinarily designed to detract attention, the wings of moths could hold the key for developing technological solutions to survive in a noisy world.

Contact lenses for diagnostic and therapeutic use
A collaborative team, which includes a group from the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation, has developed a fabrication method to meet all the challenges in making a hydrogel contact lens for biomarker sensing.

Not just lizards - alligators can regrow their tails too
A team of researchers from Arizona State University and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries have uncovered that young alligators have the ability to regrow their tails up to three-quarters of a foot, or 18% of their total body length.

New targeted therapy blocks metabolism in brain cancer cells with genetic vulnerability
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have developed a novel targeted therapy, called POMHEX, which blocks critical metabolic pathways in cancer cells with specific genetic defects.

Researchers find conformational disorder tuning charge carrier mobility in 2D perovskites
Researchers from the University of Science and Technology of China synthesized a series of 2D organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites films with large organic spacer cations, and found that mobility and broadband emission showed strong dependence on the molecular conformational order of organic cations.

Therapeutic PD-1 cancer vaccine shown to be safe and effective in animal study
A study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G.

New study provides deep insights into transmission and mutation properties of SARS-CoV-2
In the COVID-19 pandemic, 57 million people have already been infected worldwide.

Unique Schwann cells: the eyes have it
Neuroscience researchers at UConn Health are finding genetic properties of Schwann cells in the cornea that may unlock a better understanding of their role in healing, sensory function, preserving vision, and even nerve regeneration.

Researchers create 3D-printed nasal swab for COVID-19 testing
In response to the critical shortage of nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs early in the COVID-19 pandemic, the Department of Radiology at University of South Florida (USF) Health in Tampa set out to design, validate and create NP swabs using a point-of-care 3D printer.

Replication cycle of SARS-CoV-2 in 3D
Researchers have studied SARS-CoV-2 replication in cells and obtained detailed insights into the alterations induced in infected cells.

Global warming likely to increase disease risk for animals worldwide
Changes in climate can increase infectious disease risk in animals, researchers found -- with the possibility that these diseases could spread to humans, they warn.

Measuring risk-taking - by watching people move computer mouses
How you move a computer mouse while deciding whether to click on a risky bet or a safe choice may reveal how much of a risk-taker you really are.

Early weight gain in children linked to ability to produce the hormone leptin
The brain controls weight by measuring levels of leptin in the blood, which is released by fat cells.

Oil & gas industry commits to new framework to monitor, report and reduce methane emissions
In a move that will help tackle one of the biggest, most solvable contributors to the climate crisis, major oil and gas industry players today agreed to report methane emissions with a new, much higher transparency level.

COVID19 A research of Politecnico di Milano discovering the secrets of viral sequences
Use of an algorithm for computing viral mutations homogeneously across sources, using cloud computing.

New insight into the effect of hydroxychloroquine undermines its use in COVID-19
Researchers at Radboud university medical center have discovered an as yet unknown effect of hydroxychloroquine.

Galaxy encounter violently disturbed Milky Way, study finds
The long-held belief that the Milky Way, the galaxy containing Earth and the solar system, is relatively static has been ruptured by fresh cosmic insight.

Nature's toolkit for killing viruses and bacteria
Engineers reveal how zinc oxide nanoneedles and droplet hydrodynamics can stop pathogens.

Misinformation or artifact: a new way to think about machine learning
Machine learning has delivered amazing results, but there also have been failures, ranging from the harmless to potentially deadly.

New clues shed light on importance of Earth's ice sheets
Researchers examining subglacial waters both from Antarctica and Greenland found that these waters have higher concentrations of important, life-sustaining elements than previously thought, answering a big unknown for scientists seeking to understand the Earth's geochemical processes.

Study: Early, late stages of degenerative diseases are distinct
Rice University biochemists have proposed that degenerative diseases as varied as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and muscle atrophy occur in two distinct phases marked by protein signaling changes that could result in patients responding differently to the same treatment.

Flow physics could help forecasters predict extreme events
Researchers are studying a tornado's song and other 'doors to danger' in an increasingly chaotic world.

Antimicrobial soap additive worsens fatty liver disease in mice
Triclosan, an antimicrobial found in many soaps and other household items, worsens fatty liver disease in mice fed a high-fat diet.

Growing risks of STIs in over-45s
Sexually-active over-45s are at a high risk of contracting STIs because people do not want to talk about holder people having sex, a report has found.

Controlling fully integrated nanodiamonds
Physicists at Münster University have succeeded in fully integrating nanodiamonds into nanophotonic circuits and at the same time addressing several of these nanodiamonds optically.

Tracing the flow of cerebrospinal fluid
Understanding how the clear, watery substance flows through the brain could yield new insights into health and disease.

Study involving seven children's hospitals shows COVID-19 typically mild in children
In the largest U.S. study of its kind to date, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and other PEDSnet sites report that of more than 135,000 pediatric patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 in pediatric health systems, 4% tested positive for the virus.

Targeting calcium overload could improve stroke outcomes, research suggests
Excessive calcium contributes to harmful inflammation in ischemic stroke, and targeting it may provide doctors with a new way to improve patient outcomes.

Scientists organize to tackle crisis of coral bleaching
An international consortium of scientists has created the first-ever common framework for increasing comparability of research findings on coral bleaching.

Making sense of a universe of corn genetics
A new study details the latest efforts to predict traits in corn based on genomics and data analytics.

Diabetic eye disease associated with five-fold risk of severe COVID-19
People with diabetes and eye disease have a five-fold increased risk of requiring intubation when hospitalised with COVID-19.

Researchers minimize quantum backaction in thermodynamic systems via entangled measurement
Researchers from University of Science and Technology of China theoretically proved that the backaction can be suppressed to zero in a two qubit system, and conducted the first experiment using entangled collective measurement for minimizing quantum measurement backaction based on photonic system.

Shift in atmospheric rivers could affect Antarctic sea ice, glaciers
Weather systems responsible for transporting moisture from the tropics to temperate regions in the Southern Hemisphere have been gradually shifting toward the South Pole for the past 40 years, a trend which could lead to increased rates of ice melt in Antarctica, according to new research published in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters.

JAX, UMaine-lead team discover new connection between Alzheimer's dementia and Dlgap2
A national research team led by The Jackson Laboratory and the University of Maine discovered that Dlgap2, a gene that helps facilitate communication between neurons in the nervous system, is associated with the degree of memory loss in mice and risk for Alzheimer's dementia in humans.

Supersized wind turbines generate clean energy--and surprising physics
As wind energy scales up, researchers study the fluid dynamics challenges.

A chemist from RUDN University synthesized analogs of natural toxins
A chemist from RUDN University suggested a simple and accurate method for the synthesis of analogs of two natural toxins, antofine and septicine.

Siberian primrose has not had time to adapt to climate change
Global warming already affects Siberian primrose, a plant species that is threatened in Finland and Norway.

Social bacteria build shelters using the physics of fingerprints
When starvation threatens, forest-dwelling Myxococcus xanthus bacteria work collectively to form fruiting bodies, spongy mushroom-like growths that promote survival.

New type of immunotherapy may pave the way for better cancer treatments
Immunotherapy for cancer has made great advances and many patients can now receive effective treatments that were not available ten years ago.

Loyal couples in the rainforest
Coppery titi monkeys do not deceive their partners

A new beat in quantum matter
Oscillatory behaviors are ubiquitous in Nature, ranging from the orbits of planets to the periodic motion of a swing.

Laser technology: New trick for infrared laser pulses
For a long time, scientists have been looking for simple methods to produce infrared laser pulses.

Tracking and fighting fires on earth and beyond
Scientists demonstrate how fires burn and spread under different environmental conditions.

Risk of death high among those with alcohol-related visits to ED: CMAJ study
The risk of death is high for people who visit the emergency department (ED) for alcohol use, and the risk increases with frequency, according to a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal)

Changes in fire activity are threatening more than 4,400 species globally
More than 4,400 species across the globe are at risk from extinction because of changes in fire activity says a new paper involving 27 international researchers.

Helicates meet Rotaxanes to create promise for future disease treatment
A new approach to treating cancers and other diseases that uses a mechanically interlocked molecule as a 'magic bullet' has been designed by researchers at the University of Birmingham.

Recording the symphony of cellular signals that drive biology
Like a computer, cells must process information from the outside world before they respond.

Rensselaer-developed algorithm accurately predicts COVID-19 patient outcomes
In research recently published online in Medical Image Analysis, a team of engineers demonstrated how a new algorithm they developed was able to successfully predict whether or not a COVID-19 patient would need ICU intervention.

Researchers identify genetics behind deadly oat blight
A multi-institution team co-led by a Cornell University researcher has identified the genetic mechanisms that enable the production of a deadly toxin called Victorin - the causal agent for Victoria blight of oats, a disease that wiped out oat crops in the U.S. in the 1940s.

Study reveals true origin of oldest evidence of animals
Two teams of scientists have resolved a longstanding controversy surrounding the origins of complex life on Earth.

UCF researcher zeroes in on critical point for improving superconductors
Developing a practical ''room temperature'' superconductor is a feat science has yet to achieve.

Study: Opioid overdose deaths involving other substances more common in youth
Results of a new study show that opioid overdose deaths involving more than one substance (polysubstances) are more common than opioid-only overdose deaths among youth.

Study: COVID-19 infection combined with blood clots worsen patient outcomes
While respiratory issues continue to be the most common symptom of a COVID-19 infection, new research indicates the disease could also be associated with an increased tendency of the blood to clot, leading to a higher risk of death from COVID-19.

Psychosis symptoms linked to impaired information spread in the brain
Altered white matter limits the brain's conscious access to information, potentially contributing to delusions and other psychotic symptoms of mental health disorders, according to new research published in JNeurosci.

A rich source of nutrients under the Earth's ice sheets
Trace elements such as iron and zinc are essential micronutrients for all kinds of organisms.

Home health care improves COVID-19 outcomes
Survivors of COVID-19 are a vulnerable population who often have health ramifications from their illness and hospital stay.

Understanding ion channel inhibition to open doors in drug discovery
Scientists have discovered how drug-like small molecules can regulate the activity of therapeutically relevant ion channels - and their findings could transform ongoing drug development efforts.

Breakthrough in studying the enzyme that ultimately produces fish odour syndrome
Fish odour syndrome (trimethylaminuria) is a debilitating disease, in which the liver cannot break down the smelly chemical trimethylamine which is produced by enzymes from bacteria residing in the gut leaving people with a fish like odour.

Severe infections wreak havoc on mouse blood cell production
Severe infections like malaria cause short and long-term damage to precursor blood cells in mice, but some damage could be reversed, find researchers.

PEDSnet report details how COVID-19 pandemic has affected children
Analysis of 135,000+ medical records shows the novel coronavirus hits hardest among teens, children with diabetes or cancer, lower-income families, and Black, Latinx and Asian groups

Optimizing complex modeling processes through machine learning technologies
Engineering a spaceship is as difficult as it sounds. Modeling plays a large role in the time and effort it takes to create spaceships and other complex engineering systems.

The danger of Z-drugs for dementia patients
Strong sleeping pills known as 'Z-drugs' are linked with an increased risk of falls, fractures and stroke among people with dementia, according to new research.

Better survival among women after lung cancer surgery
There are known differences in the survival rates of women and men with lung cancer.

High blood sugar could increase COVID-19 death risk for non-diabetics, says study
Abnormally high blood sugar may worsen outcomes and mortality rates for COVID-19 patients, including those without diabetes, according to major research published in the peer-reviewed open access journal Annals of Medicine.

Scientists regenerate skin with stem cells to see how DNA defects in kids cause cancer
Physicians and scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center used new stem cell technology to regenerate and study living patient-specific skin in the lab, giving them a precise close up view of how inherited DNA defects cause skin damage and deadly squamous cell carcinoma in children and young adults with Fanconi anemia (FA).

The drug aprotinin inhibits entry of SARS-CoV2 in host cells
In order for the SARS-CoV2 virus to enter host cells, its ''spike'' protein has to be cleaved by the cell's own enzymes - proteases.

Differences in well-being amongst Somali, Latino and Hmong adolescents
U of M School of Nursing researchers found that acculturation was positively associated with substance use and negatively with academic achievement in adolescence.

COVID-19 cases could nearly double before Biden takes office
President-elect Joe Biden has signaled that fighting the COVID-19 pandemic will be an immediate priority for his administration.

Did early life need long, complex molecules to make cell-like compartments?
Protocell compartments used as models for an important step in the early evolution of life on Earth can be made from short polymers.

OHIO professor publishes first article that looks at concussion risk in stunt performers
Dr. Jeff Russell, associate professor of athletic training within the College of Health Sciences and Professions at Ohio University, is shining a light on a segment of concussion patients who often go unnoticed in comparison to athletes: performing artists.

To evade humans, this medicinal plant has evolved to hide in plain sight
Researchers reporting November 20, 2020 in the journal Current Biology have found that, in places where the herb is harvested more, the plant has evolved to blend in better with the background, making them harder for people to find.

NASA's Hubble sees unexplained brightness from colossal explosion
Long ago and far across the universe, an enormous burst of gamma rays unleashed more energy in a half-second than the Sun will produce over its entire 10-billion-year lifetime.

CCNY researchers overcome barriers for bio-inspired solar energy harvesting materials
Inspired by nature, researchers at The City College of New York (CCNY) can demonstrate a synthetic strategy to stabilize bio-inspired solar energy harvesting materials.

Imaging method reveals a 'symphony of cellular activities'
MIT researchers have developed a way to simultaneously image up to five different molecules within a cell, by targeting glowing reporters to distinct locations inside the cell.

Nutritional quality of foods, beverages in movies
The nutritional quality of foods and beverages depicted in 250 top-grossing movies in the United States from 1994 to 2018 was compared with dietary recommendations in this study.

Big cats and small dogs: solving the mystery of canine distemper in wild tigers
Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes a serious disease in domestic dogs, and also infects other carnivores, including threatened species like the Amur tiger.

Six years in 120 pages: Researchers shed light on Ricci flows
Researchers from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) proved two core conjectures in geometric analysis: Hamilton-Tian conjecture and the Partial C0-conjecture.

Scientists make sound-waves from a quantum vacuum at the Black Hole laboratory
Researchers have developed a new theory for observing a quantum vacuum that could lead to new insights into the behaviour of black holes.

BICRA gene provides answers to patients, doctors and scientists
Researchers identified the BICRA gene as a new disease gene involved in a neurodevelopmental disorder and found evidence that BICRA functions in neural development in humans and flies.

Lab closed? Head to the kitchen
Studies explore fluids in pancakes, beer, and the kitchen sink.

US seafood industry flounders due to COVID-19
The pandemic is putting a hurt on the seafood industry, finds the largest study of COVID on US fisheries, suggesting that fishmongers may flounder -- or go belly up -- without government aid.

Children more willing to punish if the wrongdoer is 'taught a lesson'
Many children are willing to make personal sacrifices to punish wrongdoers -- and even more so if they believe punishment will teach the transgressor a lesson, a new Yale study published Nov.

A hunger for social contact
MIT neuroscientists have found that the longings for social interaction felt during isolation are neurologically very similar to the food cravings people experience when hungry.

Identifying compound classes through machine learning
Bioinformaticians at Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany together with colleagues from Finland and the USA, have now developed a unique method with which all metabolites in a sample can be taken into account, thus considerably increasing the knowledge gained from examining such molecules.

Scientists identify brain cells that help drive bodily reaction to fear, anxiety
UNC School of Medicine discovered that artificially forcing the activity of BNST cells in mice produced an arousal response in the form of dilated pupils and faster heart rate, and worsened anxiety-like behaviors.

Snorkeling gear, animal noses inspire better personal protective equipment
Fluids researchers pivot to create more effective face coverings.

Enriching research in ecology and evolution through nine 'flavors' of history
In a recent article in The Quarterly Review of Biology, ''Beyond Equilibria: The Neglected Role of History in Ecology and Evolution,'' author Hamish G.

Nurse practitioners play key role in opioid addiction treatment in very rural areas
Giving nurse practitioners the authority to prescribe buprenorphine has brought that gold standard treatment for opioid addiction to people who might not have had access to it before, according to a new study.

Growing interest in Moon resources could cause tension, scientists find
An international team of scientists led by the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian, has identified a problem with the growing interest in extractable resources on the moon: there aren't enough of them to go around.

Direct visualization of quantum dots reveals shape of quantum wave function
Trapping and controlling electrons in bilayer graphene quantum dots yields a promising platform for quantum information technologies.

Milky Way family tree
Galaxies formed by the merging of smaller progenitor galaxies. An international team of astrophysicists led by a scientist from Heidelberg University has succeeded in reconstructing the merger history of our home galaxy, creating a complete family tree.

Largest aggregation of fishes in abyssal deep sea recorded by UH researchers
The largest aggregation of fishes ever recorded in the abyssal deep sea was discovered by a team of oceanographers during an expedition in the Clarion Clipperton Zone.

Shocks to seafood
The United States' seafood industry declined precipitously in the months following the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, and research shows that targeted federal assistance will be necessary to bring it back.

World's smallest atom-memory unit created
Faster, smaller, smarter and more energy-efficient chips for everything from consumer electronics to big data to brain-inspired computing could soon be on the way after engineers at The University of Texas at Austin created the smallest memory device yet.

The science of windy cities
Researchers model urban airflows to help improve the design of drones, skyscrapers, and natural ventilation systems.

Carbon nanocomposites are now one step closer to practical industrial
Multifunctional materials were designed to allow self-diagnostic monitoring through an inexpensive technique.

How to protect healthcare workers from COVID-19
Researchers are developing simple and inexpensive tools--like a DIY ventilator--to treat patients more effectively and prevent disease transmission in hospitals.

Non-invasive electrolyte levels' measuring method can prevent sudden cardiac death
Researchers from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania came up with the idea on how to measure fluctuating blood potassium levels non-invasively, through electrocardiogram.

Stirling research evaluates effectiveness of conservation efforts
New research from the University of Stirling into the effectiveness of international conservation projects could help to save endangered species from extinction.

How moving slower allows groups of bacteria to spread across surfaces
Scientists have found that bacterial groups spread more rapidly over surfaces when the individuals inside them move slowly, a discovery that may shed light on how bacteria spread within the body during infections.

In the Cerrado, topography explains the genetic diversity of amphibians more than land cover
Study shows that a tree frog endemic to a mountainous region of the Brazilian savanna is unable to disperse and find genetically closer mates when the terrain is rugged, potentially endangering survival of the species

Vibrational encounters - phonon polaritons meet molecules
Researchers from CIC nanoGUNE BRTA (San Sebastian, Spain), in collaboration with the Donostia International Physics Center (San Sebastián, Spain) and the University of Oviedo (Spain) employed a spectroscopic nanoimaging technique to study how infrared nanolight - in form of phonon polaritons - and molecular vibrations interact with each other.

Assessment of 136K pediatric patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 in US
This observational study used electronic health records for almost 136,000 pediatric patients in the United States to describe testing for SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 illness.

Mother's touch lingers in her child's genes
Mothers leave their mark on their children in many ways - and Melbourne researchers have discovered a protein called SMCHD1 is involved in this 'imprinting' process.

Tarantula toxin attacks with molecular stinger
A bird-catching Chinese tarantula bite contains a stinger-like poison that plunges into a molecular target in the electrical signaling system of their prey's nerve cells.

Nature is widely adapted to current climate -- making it harder to adjust to a new one
To do the right thing at the right time, organisms need to glean cues from their environment.

Research shows the intrinsically nonlinear nature of receptive fields in vision
According to a study led by Marcelo Bertalmío, a researcher at the Department of Information and Communication Technologies, published in the journal of the group Nature, Scientific Reports, which proposes a paradigm shift for both vision science and for artificial intelligence.

Cascading events led to 2018 Kīlauea volcanic eruption, providing clues for forecasting
The 2018 eruption of Kīlauea Volcano was one of the largest volcanic events in Hawai'i in 200 years.

AI helps scientists understand brain activity behind thoughts
Researchers have developed artificial intelligence (AI) models that help them better understand the brain computations that underlie thoughts.
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