Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 26, 2020
A cold-health watch and warning system for cold waves in Quebec
A team from the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) and the Institut national de santé publique du Québec (INSPQ), led by Professor Fateh Chebana, has recently developed a cold-health watch and warning system for cold waves, a first in the world.

Satellite images confirm uneven impact of climate change
University of Copenhagen researchers have been following vegetation trends across the planet's driest areas using satellite imagery from recent decades.

Understanding traditional Chinese medicine can help protect species
Demystifying traditional Chinese medicine for conservationists could be the key to better protecting endangered species like pangolins, tigers and rhino, according to University of Queensland-led researchers.

Irreversible hotter and drier climate over inner East Asia
Researchers warn that heatwaves and concurrent droughts of Mongolia's semi-arid plateau have increased significantly during the past two decades, with troubling implications for the future.

Scientists develop new gene therapy for eye disease
Scientists from Trinity College Dublin have developed a new gene therapy approach that offers promise for one day treating an eye disease that leads to a progressive loss of vision and affects thousands of people across the globe.

High genomic variability predicts success in desert tortoise refugees; could inform conservation
Tortoise refugees with the highest genetic variation are far more likely to survive conservation translocation than tortoises whose genetic diversity is lower, according to a new study.

Tree rings capture an abrupt irreversible shift in east Asia's climate
The abrupt shift to hotter and drier conditions over inner East Asia is unprecedented and may herald an irreversible shift to a new climate regime for the region, according to a new study.

UCLA study of threatened desert tortoises offers new conservation strategy
A UCLA study publishing Nov. 27 in Science supports a new conservation strategy.

German researchers compile world's largest inventory of known plant species
Researchers at Leipzig University and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) have compiled the world's most comprehensive list of known plant species.

ECDC and WHO call for improved HIV testing in Europe
The number of people living with undiagnosed HIV is increasing in the WHO European Region.

Archaeology: Neanderthal thumbs better adapted to holding tools with handles
Neanderthal thumbs were better adapted to holding tools in the same way that we hold a hammer, according to a paper published in Scientific Reports.

Big data powers design of 'smart' cell therapies for cancer
Finding medicines that can kill cancer cells while leaving normal tissue unscathed is a Holy Grail of oncology research.

A multidisciplinary policy design to protect consumers from AI collusion
Legal scholars, computer scientists and economists must work together to prevent unlawful price-surging behaviors from artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms used by rivals in a competitive market, argue Emilio Calvano and colleagues in this Policy Forum.

In temperate trees, climate-driven increase in carbon capture causes autumn leaves to fall sooner
For decades, scientists have expected that the shedding of leaves from temperate trees will get later and later under ongoing climate change.

A route for avoiding defects during additive manufacturing
Research published in Science reveals how pores form during metals additive manufacturing and become defects trapped in solidifying metal.

Study revealing the secret behind a key cellular process refutes biology textbooks
New research has identified and described a cellular process that, despite what textbooks say, has remained elusive to scientists until now -- precisely how the copying of genetic material that, once started, is properly turned off.

New Hubble data explains missing dark matter
New data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope provides further evidence for tidal disruption in the galaxy NGC 1052-DF4.

Microswimmers move like moths to the light
The Freigeist group at TU Dresden, led by chemist Dr Juliane Simmchen, has studied an impressive behavior of synthetic microswimmers: as soon as the photocatalytic particles leave an illuminated zone, they flip independently and swim back into the light.

It's not too late to save 102 species at risk of extinction
The Fraser River estuary in British Columbia is home to 102 species at risk of extinction.

Time for total rethink on the management of alien species
A new study led by the University of Plymouth and the Marine and Environmental Research (MER) Lab in Cyprus is calling for a complete rethink of how non-indigenous or alien species are considered in the future

Doctors confirm the existence of multiple chronotypes
Having conducted a large-scale study, a team of scientists improved the classification of human diurnal activity and suggested using 6 chronotypes instead of just 'early birds' and 'night owls'.

Deadly snake bites: Potential antivenom discovered
Each year, hundreds of thousands of people lose their mobility or life after having been bitten by a venomous snake.

T-ray technology reveals what's getting under your skin
A new method for analysing the structure of skin using a type of radiation known as T-rays could help improve the diagnosis and treatment of skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis and skin cancer.

Struggles of care home staff during COVID-19 first wave revealed in Whatsapp messages
Analysis of social media messages between care home staff on the coronavirus front line reveal their growing concerns over how to manage in the face of the virus.

Rapid-forming giants could disrupt spiral protoplanetary discs
Giant planets that developed early in a star system's life could solve a mystery of why spiral structures are not observed in young protoplanetary discs, according to a new study by University of Warwick astronomers.

The German press disparages dissenting voices on climate change
According to research presented in an article published in the journal Media Culture & Society on 8 October by Lena von Zabern, winning alumni of the award for best master's degree final project in UPF Planetary Wellbeing, and Christopher D.

Insulators in Alberta at higher risk of chest infections, COPD: study
Construction workers in Alberta, Canada who work with hazardous insulation materials are much more likely to be affected by repeated chest infections and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to new research published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

Alpha animals must bow to the majority when they abuse their power
Democratic decision-making allows subordinate vulturine guineafowl to regain control over collective group actions when dominants have a monopoly over resources.

Light confinement in a 3D space
SUTD researchers develop technology which allows for photonic integrated circuits to unlock their potential as high resolution 3D photonic structures in ultra-high speed communications.

Safe ultraviolet light could be used to sterilise high-risk COVID-19 environments
Research at Cranfield University is paving the way for a new solution to kill aerosolised COVID-19 in enclosed environments such as hospitals and long-term care facilities.

Researchers discovered solid phosphorus from a comet
An international study led from the University of Turku, Finland, discovered phosphorus and fluorine in solid dust particles collected from a comet.

Surrey's new hybrid X-ray detector goes toe-to-toe with state-of-the-art rivals
A new hybrid X-ray detector developed by the University of Surrey outperforms commercial devices - and could lead to more accurate cancer therapy.

The neurobiology of thirst: The neural mechanisms that control hydration
Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) provide deeper insights into neural thirst control.

Which factors trigger leaf die-off in autumn?
Researchers at ETH Zurich have identified a self-regulating mechanism in European deciduous trees that limits their growing-season length: Trees that photosynthesise more in spring and summer lose their leaves earlier in autumn.

Sun model completely confirmed for the first time
The Borexino experiment research team has succeeded in detecting neutrinos from the sun's second fusion process, the Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen cycle (CNO cycle) for the first time.

Two out of three people would have a COVID-19 vaccine when one becomes available
Scientists at Keele University and King's College London have found that 64% of people would be likely to have a COVID-19 vaccination when one became available.
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