Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 27, 2020
Doctors report unusual case of patient 'mirror writing' in the emergency room
In new research presented at Euroanaesthesia (the annual meeting of the European Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care [ESAIC]), doctors report a highly unusual case of a right-handed patient performing unconscious 'mirror-writing' with her left hand while in the midst of having epileptic seizures in the emergency room.

Electronic skin has a strong future stretching ahead
Soft, stretchy, slimline and strong electronics could accelerate the arrival of artificial skin.

Mine ponds amplify mercury risks in Peru's Amazon
The proliferation of pits and ponds created in recent years by miners digging for gold in Peru's Amazon has altered the landscape and amplified the risk of mercury poisoning, a new study shows.

Scientists reveal regions of the brain where serotonin promotes patience
In a study on mice conducted by the Neural Computation Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), the authors, Dr.

How lockdown may lead to "avoidable harm" for the health of under 16s
Decreases in hospital attendances and admissions amid fears of COVID-19 may result in avoidable harm for under 16s say researchers.

UK's aim to half maternal mortality by 2030 is challenged by social inequalities, and increasing maternal age, obesity and c-section rates
The complex issues around maternal deaths in the UK will be presented at Euroanaesthesia in a new review by an anaesthesiologist who works on the UK Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths (CEMD), which began in 1952 and investigates the death of every mother during pregnancy and after childbirth.

Neuromorphic computing with memristors
In a paper published in NANO, researchers study the role of memristors in neuromorphic computing.

Oxford University podcast returns with season on the History of Pandemics
The University of Oxford's CASE Gold Award winning podcast, Futuremakers, will return for its third season at the end of October.

How stable is the Antarctic ice sheet?
As temperatures rise due to climate change, the melting of polar ice sheets is accelerating.

Poverty and honesty are not opposites
Does poverty cause lying? An international research team led by behavioral economist Agne Kajackaite from the WZB Berlin Social Science Center, Suparee Boonmanunt (Mahidol University, Bangkok) and Stephan Meier (Columbia Business School) examined whether poverty-stricken individuals were especially prone to acts of dishonesty.

Review of first wave in Italy concludes using age alone to determine if someone gets COVID-19 intensive care treatment is not fair
Italy was one the countries first hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The genetic blueprint that results in foot-and-mouth being so infectious
Scientists have conducted a 'molecular dissection' of a part of the virus that causes foot-and-mouth disease, to try and understand why the pathogen is so infectious.

Bacteria colonies invade new territories without traffic jams -- how?
An international collaboration between researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Oxford University, and University of Sheffield has revealed that colonies of slow moving bacteria can expand significantly quicker than their fast moving counterparts - and how.

Call for 'debt driving licence'
People borrowing money for the first time should only be given small amounts until they have proved their competence, a new study says.

New procedure will reduce the need for rare metals in chemical synthesis
Researchers from Kanazawa University performed an important type of tertiary alkylative cross-coupling reaction without using a rare-metal catalyst.

Genes unlock clues to the evolution and survival of the Great Barrier Reef
Innovative molecular techniques explain how corals on the east coast of Australia survived previous tough conditions--enabling the Great Barrier Reef to become the vast reef it is today.

COVID-19: Fall in cancer drug treatment rose quickly following 'rapid' NHS guidance
The number of patients starting anticancer therapies dropped by more than 30 per cent in April, the month following the UK's first COVID-19 lockdown, but went above pre-pandemic levels within three months, finds a new study of NHS England data co-led by UCL researchers.

Accurate and efficient 3D motion tracking using deep learning
A new sensing method has made tracking movement easier and more efficient.

Cereal, olive and vine pollen reveal market integration in Ancient Greece
By analyzing sediment cores taken from six sites in southern Greece, an international team of researchers identified trends in cereal, olive, and vine pollen indicating structural changes in agricultural production between 1000 BCE and 600 CE.

What does a crisis cost?
The Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) and Helmut Schmidt University/University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg (HSU/UniBwH) named their scientific research group, which focuses on the ''Costs of a crisis - analysis of the significance of non-events in consumer health protection'' ''Erika (Effective Risk Communication)''.

Puzzling 'cold quasar' forming new stars in spite of active galactic nucleus
Using NASA's SOFIA telescope, University of Kansas researchers have found CQ 4479, a galaxy which never had been closely studied before, to be generating new stars in spite of a luminous AGN at the galaxy's center.

A tricky kidney puzzle
By analyzing the gene expression of single cells, algorithms are able to not only reconstruct their original location in the tissue, but also to determine details about their function.

Scientists describe the role of a p53 target gene in lymphoma and lung cancer development
An international team of scientists has studied whether Zmat3 could have critical functions that p53, the most important gene in preventing cancer, uses to prevent cancer.

Small molecules control bacterial resistance to antibiotics
Antibiotics have revolutionized medicine by providing effective treatments for infectious diseases such as cholera.

Brain's 'speedometer' could help solve part of dementia puzzle
Dr Jon Brown led a team of scientists to examine how these speed-sensing nerve cells in a specific part of the brain known as the entorhinal cortex might be affected in Alzheimer's disease

COVID-19 amplifies inequalities in healthcare access for ethnic minority and migrant women
In their recent research paper, published in the Feminist Legal Studies journal, City, University of London's Dr Sabrina Germain and Dr Adrienne Yong say existing barriers to medical care for these marginalised women have been intensified by the pandemic, and must be examined so as to understand their poorer health outcomes.

Researchers develop new biomaterial that helps bones heal faster
Scientists have developed a new biomaterial that helps bones heal faster by enhancing adults' stem cell regenerative ability.

Airplane noise at night can trigger cardiovascular death
For the first time, a study demonstrated that loud night-time noise from airplanes can trigger a cardiovascular death within two hours.
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