Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 30, 2020
Unemployment insurance, health-related social needs, health care access, mental health during COVID-19 pandemic
This observational study assessed whether receiving unemployment insurance is associated with lower health-related social needs, better health care access and better mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Fit gamers challenge 'fat' stereotype, new esports research
A QUT led survey of 1400 participants from 65 countries has found esports players are up to 21 per cent healthier weight than the general population, hardly smoke and also drink less.

Measuring broken hearts: divorce has negative effects on physical and mental health
Divorce can be grueling, and researchers are interested in understanding the factors that affect mental and physical health during this experience.

Deep learning predicts woman's risk for breast cancer
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have developed a deep learning model that identifies imaging biomarkers on screening mammograms to predict a patient's risk for developing breast cancer with greater accuracy than traditional risk assessment tools.

The 'smell' of coral as an indicator of reef health
A study conducted in the southern Great Barrier Reef reveals the chemical diversity of emissions from healthy corals.

Teaching computers the meaning of sensor names in smart home
The UPV/EHU's IXA group has use natural language processing techniques to overcome one of the major difficulties associated with smart homes, namely that the systems developed to infer activities in one environment do not work when they are applied to a different one, because both the sensors and the activities are different.

Big data saves lives, and patient safeguards are needed
The use of big data to address the opioid epidemic in Massachusetts poses ethical concerns that could undermine its benefits without clear governance guidelines that protect and respect patients and society, a University of Massachusetts Amherst study concludes.

Family pigs prefer their owner's company as dogs do, but they might not like strangers
Researchers compared how young companion dogs and companion pigs seek human proximity in a novel environment.

Forest fires, cars, power plants join list of risk factors for Alzheimer's disease
A new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco has found that among older Americans with cognitive impairment, the greater the air pollution in their neighborhood, the higher the likelihood of amyloid plaques - a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease.

Recycled concrete could be a sustainable way to keep rubble out of landfi
Results of a new five-year study of recycled concrete show that it performs as well, and in several cases even better, than conventional concrete.

FEFU scientists explain how to storage cipher data in magnetic skyrmions
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with international collaborators propose direct magnetic writing of skyrmions, i.e. magnetic quasiparticles, and skyrmion lattices, within which it is possible to encode, transmit, process information, and produce topological patterns with a resolution of less than 100 nanometers.

Pyroclasts protect the paintings of Pompeii buried but damage them when they are unearthed
A study conducted by the UPV/EHU's IBeA group shows that pyroclasts may be putting the conservation of the paintings of Pompeii at risk.

Forearm fractures may signal intimate partner violence
Up to one-third of adult women who sustain a non-displaced fracture to the ulna bone of the forearm may be victims of intimate partner violence, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Jaguars robust to climate extremes but lack of food threatens species
QUT researchers lead a world-first investigation into the chances of wild jaguars surviving climate extremes with six scenarios modelling the behaviour, mating, births of cubs, competition, illegal hunting, death from starvation and availability of prey.

Astronomical instrument hunts for ancient metal
Researchers created a new astronomical instrument that has successfully aided in estimating the abundance of metals in the early universe.

How we learn words and sentences at the same time
How people work out the meanings of new words has been revealed by Lancaster University researchers, who say this is similar to the way in which young children learn language.

Older adults with dementia exhibit financial 'symptoms' up to six years before diagnosis
A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Federal Reserve Board of Governors found that Medicare beneficiaries who go on to be diagnosed with dementia are more likely to miss payments on bills as early as six years before a clinical diagnosis.

A shapeshifting material based on inorganic matter
By embedding titanium-based sheets in water, a group led by scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science has created a material using inorganic materials that can be converted from a hard gel to soft matter using temperature changes, recreating the strange behavior of sea cucumbers.

Does your pain feel different in English and Spanish?
In a recent study, University of Miami graduate student Morgan Gianola hoped to clarify how such psychological differences across languages might also relate to changes in physical and emotional experiences, like pain.

Study reveals connection between gut bacteria and vitamin D levels
UC San Diego researchers discovered that the makeup of a person's gut microbiome is linked to their levels of active vitamin D, and revealed a new understanding of vitamin D and how it's typically measured.

COVID-19 studies should also focus on mucosal immunity, researchers argue
More COVID-19 studies should be devoted to how immunity emerges to SARS-CoV-2 in the mucous membranes of the nose and mouth, a new paper argues.

How does the spider spin its self-assembled silk?
Kyoto University researchers report on a new model for spider silk assembly.

Plastic contaminants harm sea urchins
Plastics in the ocean can release chemicals that cause deformities in sea urchin larvae, new research shows.

New method identifies adaptive mutations in complex evolving populations
A research team co-led by a scientist at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology has developed a method to study how HIV mutates to escape the immune system in multiple patients, which could inform HIV vaccine design.

Customized programming of human stem cells
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) have the potential to convert into a wide variety of cell types and tissues.

Caribbean coral reefs under siege from aggressive algae
Human activity endangers coral health around the world. A new algal threat is taking advantage of coral's already precarious situation in the Caribbean and making it even harder for reef ecosystems to grow.

Heart disease risk in women increases leading up to menopause; early intervention is key
Experts with the American Heart Association reviewed current research indicating how a woman's hormone changes, body composition, cholesterol and vascular health during the years leading to menopause (or menopause transition), which can increase the risk of developing heart disease after menopause.

Researchers identify gene responsible for cellular aging
Cellular reprogramming can reverse the aging that leads to a decline in the activities and functions of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs).

Study reveals unintended impact of conversation policies
New research involving the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows how conservation polices can avoid having unintended consequences for local ecosystems and people.

Tipping point for the climate can already be a reality in East Asia
The climate in inner East Asia may already have reached a tipping point, where recent years' transition to abnormally hot and dry summers can be irreversible.

Protein commonly screened for in pregnancy is linked to gestational diabetes
Laboratory research and analysis of epidemiological data by Silvia Corvera, MD, and Tiffany Moore Simas, MD, MPH, MEd, and colleagues show that low levels of a protein commonly seen in screening tests for chromosomal disorders during the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with adipose tissue remodeling, glucose resistance and gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant women.

Report assesses promises and pitfalls of private investment in conservation
In the latest Issues in Ecology, leading scientists, lawyers, investors and economists explore how privately financed conservation projects can generate both financial returns and positive conservation outcomes.

How SARS-CoV-2 reaches the brain
Using post-mortem tissue samples, researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have studied the mechanisms by which the novel coronavirus can reach the brains of patients with COVID-19.

Women found to be at higher risk for heart failure and heart attack death than men
Researchers found women face a 20% increased risk of developing heart failure or dying within five years after their first severe heart attack compared with men.

Killer electrons in strumming sky lights
Wisps of pulsating aurora lights are a rare, yet magical sight.

Black bear gut biome surprisingly simple, scientists say
In recent decades, researchers have found that most mammals' guts are surprisingly complex environments - home to a variety of microbial ecosystems that can profoundly affect an animal's well-being.

Fast-moving gas flowing away from young star caused by icy comet vaporisation
A unique stage of planetary system evolution has been imaged by astronomers, showing fast-moving carbon monoxide gas flowing away from a star system over 400 light years away, a discovery that provides an opportunity to study how our own solar system developed.

Detecting bacteria with fluorescent nanosensors
Researchers from Bochum, Göttingen, Duisburg and Cologne have developed a new method for detecting bacteria and infections.

Gut microbes: a key to normal sleep
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba used a cocktail of antibiotics to deplete gut microbes in mice.

Towards accessible healthcare for all in sub-Saharan Africa
A state-of-the-art georeferenced database of public healthcare facilities. In the prestigious journal PNAS, a new study published with the contribution of the RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment (EIEE) provides a comprehensive planning-oriented, inequality-focused analysis of different types of healthcare accessibility in sub-Saharan Africa.

Warbler coloration shaped by evolution via distinct paths
Two genes that are important for the diverse colors and patterns of warbler plumage have evolved through two very different processes, according to a new study led by Penn State researchers.

Area burned by severe fire increased 8-fold in western US over past four decades
The number of wildfires and the amount of land they consume in the western US has substantially increased since the 1980s, a trend often attributed to ongoing climate change.

Preschool children can't see the mountains for the cat
Imagine seeing an image of a cat in front of a wide scene of mountains and being told just to remember the mountains if you saw them in a later picture.

The number of times a person gives birth may affect how quickly they age
Having children doesn't just make you feel like you've aged overnight -- a new study led by Penn State researchers found that the number of times a person gives birth may also affect the body's physical aging process.

On-chip erbium-doped lithium niobate microcavity laser
Researchers developed a 1-mol% erbium-doped LN crystal and its LNOI on the silicon substrate, and fabricated an erbium-doped LNOI microdisk with a high quality factor (~1.05x10^5).

Raman holography
Scientists from ICFO and University Rovira i Virgili report on a novel Raman holographic technique capable of tracking individual particles in 3D volumes from one single image.

More than one-third of children with COVID-19 show no symptoms: study
More than one-third of kids who have COVID-19 aren't showing symptoms, according to a University of Alberta study that suggests youngsters diagnosed with the disease may represent just a fraction of those infected.

Future Brahmaputra River flooding as climate changes may be underestimated, study says
A new study looking at seven centuries of water flow in south Asia's mighty Brahmaputra River suggests that scientists are underestimating the river's potential for catastrophic flooding as climate warms.

Covid-19 shutdowns disproportionately affected low-income black households
Princeton University researchers now report that low-income Black households experienced greater job loss, more food and medicine insecurity, and higher indebtedness in the early months of #COVID19 compared to white or Latinx low-income households.

Sustainable regenerated isotropic wood
A high-performance sustainable regenerated isotropic wood (RGI-wood) is reported, constructed from surface nanocrystallized wood particles (SNWP) by efficient bottom-up strategy.

Race/ethnicity among children with COVID-19-associated multisystem inflammatory syndrome
The distribution of race/ethnicity among cases of COVID-19]-associated multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children reported to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is described in this observational study.

Mechanism of action of chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19 infection
The recent serious outbreak of Covid19 has required urgent medical treatments for numerous patients.

Hitting the quantum 'sweet spot': Researchers find best position for atom qubits in silicon
Australian researchers have located the 'sweet spot' for positioning qubits in silicon to scale up atom-based quantum processors.

N-heterocyclic phosphines: promising catalysts for transfer hydrogenation
N-heterocyclic phosphines (NHPs) have recently emerged as a new group of promising catalysts for metal-free reductions, owing to their unique hydridic reactivity.

Separating gases using flexible molecular sieves
Researchers at the University of Liverpool and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology have made reported some exciting findings relating to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a class of porous materials, which could benefit a wide range of important gas separation processes.

Math enables custom arrangements of liquid 'nesting dolls'
Princeton University researchers have developed a new way to examine, predict and engineer interactions between multiple liquid phases, including arrangements of mixtures with an arbitrary number of separated phases.

Magnetic vortices come full circle
The first experimental observation of three-dimensional magnetic 'vortex rings' provides fundamental insight into intricate nanoscale structures inside bulk magnets, and offers fresh perspectives for magnetic devices.

Natural resources governance -- responsibilization of citizens or forcing responsibility on them?
The possibilities of citizens to participate in natural resource governance are increasing.

Molecular mechanism of long-term memory discovered
Researchers at the University of Basel have discovered a molecular mechanism that plays a central role in intact long-term memory.

Penn researchers unlock the door to tumor microenvironment for CAR T cells
Combining chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy with a PAK4 inhibitor drug allowed the engineered cells to punch their way through and attack solid tumors, leading to significantly enhanced survival in mice.

Genetic treatment plus exercise reverses fatigue in mice with muscle wasting disease
Adding exercise to a genetic treatment for myotonic dystrophy type 1 was more effective at reversing fatigue than administering the treatment alone in a study using a mouse model of the disease.

MSK study is the first to link microbiota to dynamics of the human immune system
MSK researchers have uncovered an important finding about the relationship between the microbiota and the immune system, showing for the first time that the concentration of different types of immune cells in the blood changes in relation to the presence of different bacterial strains in the gut.

App predicts risk of developing Alzheimer's
A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that validated biomarkers can reveal an individual's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

Guam's most endangered tree species reveals universal biological concept
Newly published research carried out at the University of Guam has used a critically endangered species to show how trees modify leaf function to best exploit prevailing light conditions.

Nanoscopic barcodes set a new science limit
The University of Technology Sydney (UTS) led collaboration developed a nanocrystal growth method that controls the growth direction, producing programmable atomic thin layers, arbitrary barcoded nanorods, with morphology uniformity.

Combination therapy might improve outcomes in treatment-resistant liver cancer
A combination cancer therapy that is effective against treatment-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by inhibiting tumor growth and increasing survival has been identified by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Worst-case emissions projections are already off-track
New University of Colorado Boulder research reveals that emissions are not growing as fast as the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's assessments have indicated--and that the IPCC is not using the most up-to-date climate scenarios in its planning and policy recommendations.

Emergency department doctors ask: "Where did all the patients go?"
During the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic in New England, emergency department visits for medical emergencies - including psychiatric problems, trauma and heart attacks - declined by nearly a third, raising concerns among clinicians that critically ill patients were not seeking the care they needed for fear of coronavirus infection.

Even razor clams on sparsely populated Olympic Coast can't escape plastics, study finds
Portland State University researchers and their collaborators at the Quinault Indian Nation and Oregon State University found microplastics in Pacific razor clams on Washington's sparsely populated Olympic Coast -- proof, they say, that even in more remote regions, coastal organisms can't escape plastic contamination.

Biodiesel made from discarded cardboard boxes
Dr. Sun-Mi Lee and her team at the Clean Energy Research Center of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) have announced that they have developed a novel microorganism capable of producing biodiesel precursors from lignocellulosic biomass such as discarded agricultural by-products, waste paper, and cardboard boxes.

Researchers find how stress and the circadian clock affect sleep
Japanese researchers have found a new neural pathway that links the circadian clock, stress, and wakefulness in mammals.

AI solution to a 50-year-old science challenge could 'revolutionise' medical research
Proteins form the machinery that keep all animals, plants and bacteria alive and well.

Cortex over reflex: Study traces circuits where executive control overcomes instinct
Via circuit tracing and behavioral manipulation using optogenetics, a new study shows that a region of the prefrontal cortex connects to the superior colliculus to override the SC's reflexive action when executive control is necessary.

How 'smell training' could help overcome post-viral smell distortions
Smell loss is a prominent symptom of Covid-19 and the pandemic is leaving many people with long-term smell loss or smell distortions such as parosmia.

Research unlocks new information about reading through visual dictionary in the brain
The uniquely human ability to read is the cornerstone of modern civilization, yet very little is understood about the effortless ability to derive meaning from written words.

The surprising grammar of touch
A new study demonstrates that grammar is evident and widespread in a system of communication based on reciprocal, tactile interaction, thus reinforcing the notion that if one linguistic channel, such as hearing, or vision, is unavailable, structures will find another way to create formal categories.

Microfluidic system with cell-separating powers may unravel how novel pathogens attack
To develop effective therapeutics against pathogens, scientists need to first uncover how they attack host cells.

Study identifies countries and states with greatest age biases
Michigan State University researchers concluded a pair of studies that found how age bias varies among countries and states.

Mild electrical stimulation with heat shock ameliorates kidney disease
The combination of mild electrical stimulation and heat shock at 42 °C (MES+HS) exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects in a mouse model of nephrotic syndrome (NS) by inhibiting apoptosis (cell death) of kidney cells.

AI model uses retinal scans to predict Alzheimer's disease
A form of artificial intelligence designed to interpret a combination of retinal images was able to successfully identify a group of patients who were known to have Alzheimer's disease, suggesting the approach could one day be used as a predictive tool, according to an interdisciplinary study from Duke University.

Linking medically complex children's outpatient team with hospitalists improved care
When medically complex children are hospitalized, linking hospitalists to their regular outpatient providers through an inpatient consultation service were more likely to improve outcomes, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Nonlinear beam cleaning in spatiotemporally mode-locked lasers
Researchers from École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland (EPFL) recently developed a new approach for generating high-energy, ultrashort pulses with single-mode beam quality: nonlinear beam cleaning in a multimode laser cavity.

Young people feel let down by politicians and media stereotypes, says new research
An international study titled: To Lockdown and back: young people's lived experience of the COVID-19 pandemic says young people's perspectives on COVID-19 recovery is being overshadowed by negative 'victim or villain' narratives.

Thinking outside the cage
A reverse form of host-guest chemistry could upend the way the chemical industry approaches challenging, energy-intensive molecular separations.

Earthquake scenario for large German city
What if there is a major earthquake near Cologne? This scenario is subject of the ''Risk Analysis in Civil Protection 2019'' report that was recently submitted to the German Bundestag.

Hackensack University Medical Center cancer specialist demonstrates safety of novel agent
The findings, published in the online edition of Clinical Cancer Research on Nov.

'Financial toxicity' of prostate cancer treatment: Radiation therapy has the greatest impact on patient finances
For men with early-stage prostate cancer, choices about initial treatment carry varying risks of 'financial toxicity,' reports a study in The Journal of Urology®, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA).

Gene therapy gives man with sickle cell disease the chance for a better future
Watch a video about Evie's treatment with an experimental gene therapy for sickle cell disease here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmQJpuLx07Y

Simulations open a new way to reverse cell aging
Research findings by a KAIST team provide insight into the complex mechanism of cellular senescence and present a potential therapeutic strategy for reducing age-related diseases associated with the accumulation of senescent cells.

Why spending a long time on your phone isn't bad for mental health
General smartphone usage is a poor predictor of anxiety, depression or stress say researchers, who advise caution when it comes to digital detoxes.

Liver cirrhosis: Disease progression
Patients with liver cirrhosis display a wide range of clinical symptoms.

First meta-analysis shows promise for yoga, meditation, mindfulness in concussion
Chronic concussion symptoms are notoriously difficult to treat. But Rebecca Acabchuk - a UConn researcher who is also a yoga instructor and has been teaching yoga for 17 years - is hoping that a recently published InCHIP study, the first-ever meta-analysis looking at the use of yoga, meditation, and mindfulness-based interventions for the effective treatment of chronic concussion symptoms, will offer hope to those still struggling with their symptoms.

New tests identify very early changes in Alzheimer's disease before symptoms appear
Researchers at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, together with their colleagues at the Barcelona Beta Research Centre in Spain, the University Medical Centre in Ljubljana, Slovenia, and the University of Paris, have found new forms of tau protein that become abnormal in the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease before cognitive problems develop.

A large-scale tool to investigate the function of autism spectrum disorder genes
Scientists have developed a technology to investigate the function of many different genes in many different cell types at once, in a living organism.

Could private investment finance conservation?
A new report called Innovative Finance for Conservation: Roles for Ecologists and Practitioners, explores how private investment could boost conservation in a big way.

Mystery of Siberian freshwater seal food choice solved
Seals native to Siberia's Lake Baikal have been found to have a remarkable adaptation in their teeth that has allowed them to prosper even in the face of limited nutrient offerings.

Imagining perfect molecules using AI - a benchmarking system for generative chemistry
Insilico Medicine together with collaborators announces the publication of Molecular Sets (MOSES), a benchmarking system for generative chemistry models.

DeepMind develops AI solution to 50-year-old protein challenge
By developing a solution to one of biology's grand challenges, DeepMind shows the impact AI can have on scientific discovery.

Major differences in palliative care provision across the globe
A major review of palliative care services around the world has highlighted huge inconsistencies in provision, with patients in some countries receiving a fraction of the support provided elsewhere.

Chemical compounds in foods can inhibit a key SARS-CoV-2 enzyme
Chemical compounds in foods or beverages like green tea, muscadine grapes and dark chocolate can bind to and block the function of a particular enzyme, or protease, in the SARS-CoV-2 virus, according to a new study by plant biologists at North Carolina State University.

Tree rings provide evidence for climate regime shifts
Researchers at the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have given an overview on using tree rings to identify climate regime shifts in a perspective paper, they provided background in the field and discussed its advances.

Holographic fluorescence imaging
A study in Science Advances by ICFO researchers, in collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital, reports on a novel fluorescence holographic technique for the fast tracking of the 3D motion in cells.

Computer-aided creativity in robot design
RoboGrammar is a new system that automates and optimizes robot design.

Discoveries highlight new possibilities for magnesium batteries
Researchers from the University of Houston and the Toyota Research Institute of North America have reported a breakthrough in the development of magnesium batteries, allowing them to operate at room temperature and deliver a power density comparable to that of lithium-ion batteries.

Plant-based diet ramps up metabolism, according to new study
A plant-based diet boosts after-meal burn, leads to weight loss, and improves cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight individuals, according to a new randomized control trial published in JAMA Network Open by researchers with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.

Researchers explore population size, density in rise of centralized power in antiquity
A University of Maine-led group of researchers developed Power Theory, a model emphasizing the role of demography in political centralization, and applied it to the shift in power dynamics in prehistoric northern coastal societies in Peru.

Stanford engineers combine light and sound to see underwater
''Airborne and spaceborne radar and laser-based, or LIDAR, systems have been able to map Earth's landscapes for decades.

Wuhan mass screening identifies hundreds of asymptomatic cases
A mass screening programme of 10 million Wuhan residents identified 300 asymptomatic cases in May, but none were infectious - according to a new study.

Ultrathin spray-applied MXene antennas are ready for 5G
New antennas so thin that they can be sprayed into place are also robust enough to provide a strong signal at bandwidths that will be used by fifth-generation (5G) mobile devices.

New tech can get oxygen, fuel from Mars's salty water
A new electrolysis system that makes use of briny water could provide astronauts on Mars with life-supporting oxygen and fuel for the ride home.

Lower current leads to highly efficient memory
Researchers are a step closer to realizing a new kind of memory that works according to the principles of spintronics which is analogous to, but different from, electronics.

Study reveals new findings on nature's UV sunscreens
Swansea University research has provided a new insight into the behaviour of nature's own UV sunscreens when they are exposed to other parts of the light spectrum.

The wily octopus: king of flexibility
Octopuses have the most flexible appendages known in nature, according to a new study in Scientific Reports. In addition to being soft and strong, each of the animal's eight arms can bend, twist, elongate and shorten in many combinations to produce diverse movements.

Alzheimer disease, related dementias and risk of financial errors
Researchers linked administrative health care and demographic data from Medicare to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York/Equifax Consumer Credit Panel to characterize the financial presentation of Alzheimer disease and related dementias before and after diagnosis.

UN to issue first-ever global report on harmful algal blooms
A seven-year analysis of almost 10,000 Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) events worldwide over three decades will be published by the HAB Programme of UNESCO's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission.

Study shows strong links between music and math, reading achievement
Music educator Martin J. Bergee thought that if he could just control his study for the myriad factors that might have influenced previous ones - race, income, education, etc.

Bacteria in iron-deficient environments process carbon sources selectively
Looking at a group of bacteria from soil, researchers at Northwestern University discovered that these organisms overcome limitation in their carbon processing machinery by rerouting their metabolic pathways to favor producing iron-scavenging compounds.

Business closures, partial reopenings due to COVID-19 could cost the US $3-$5 trillion i
USC economists project that a best-case scenario for the United States hinges on whether the initial mandatory closures and social distancing measures were sufficient to control the rise in coronavirus cases.

New cyberattack can trick scientists into making toxins or viruses -- Ben-Gurion University researchers
The researchers found that accessibility and automation of the synthetic gene engineering workflow, combined with insufficient cybersecurity controls, allow malware to interfere with biological processes within the victim's lab, closing the loop with the possibility of an exploit written into a DNA molecule.

HIV-like virus edited out of primate genome
Taking a major step forward in HIV research, scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have successfully edited SIV - a virus closely related to HIV, the cause of AIDS - from the genomes of non-human primates.

Seismic guidelines underestimate impact of 'The Big One' on metro Vancouver buildings
Scientists examining the effects of a megathrust earthquake in the Pacific Northwest say tall buildings across Metro Vancouver will experience greater shaking than currently accounted for by Canada's national seismic hazard model.

An escape route for seafloor methane
An MIT study has solved the mystery of how and why columns of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, can stream out of solid sea-floor formations known as methane hydrates.

A dessert-like desert: Californian lithosphere resembles crème brûlée
A model for the southeastern California lithosphere suggests that a strong upper crust overlies weaker lower rock layers.

Racial disparities in dementia in US
Nationally representative data were used to examine if racial disparities in the occurrence of dementia in the United States changed from 2000 to 2016.

Deep-sea volcanoes: Windows into the subsurface
New research at the Brothers submarine arc volcano sheds light on the complexity of microbial composition on the seafloor and provides insights into how past and the present subsurface process could be imprinted in microbial diversity.

New DNA scanning method could lead to quicker diagnosis of cancer and rare disease
Scientists at the University of Nottingham have made a major breakthrough in genome sequencing, which will enable them to search for the underlying causes of diseases in human DNA quicker than ever before.

Laboratory experiments unravelling the mystery of the Mars moon Phobos
There is no weather in space - but there is weathering: Celestial bodies are bombarded by high energy particles.

Mothers' stress may lead to preterm births, faster aging in children
Why do some people age faster than others? A new UCLA-led study indicates that a mother's stress prior to giving birth may accelerate her child's biological aging later in life.

Study explores how telemedicine may ease ER overcrowding
Researchers led by Dr. Shujing Sun at UT Dallas found that the adoption of telemedicine in the emergency room significantly shortened average length of stay and wait time.

Researchers show risk-averse teens sway peers to make safer choices
Prior studies have shown adolescents are likely to experiment along with friends who use drugs and alcohol.

Scientists uncover the mysterious origin of canal grass in Panama
How did canal grass arrive in Panama? STRI staff scientist Kristin Saltonstall compared the DNA of sugar cane relatives from around the world to find out.

Earth faster, closer to black hole in new map of galaxy
Earth just got 7 km/s faster and about 2000 light-years closer to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy.

Experimental vaccine for deadly tickborne virus effective in cynomolgus macaques
An experimental vaccine developed in Europe to prevent infection by Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) has protected cynomolgus macaques in a new collaborative study from National Institutes of Health scientists.

Unexpected similarity between honey bee and human social life
A team of researchers have experimentally measured the social networks of honey bees and how they develop over time.

How smart cities can serve citizens
At the Dentons Rodyk Dialogue 2020, Minister for National Development Desmond Lee joined a panel of experts to discuss how digitalization can help to transform cities.

Bridges between villages in Nicaragua serve as links to markets
Yale Economic Growth Center researcher Kevin Donovan and coauthor find that building footbridges positively affects rural economies in flood-prone areas.

Surprising trove of sorghum diversity discovered in Australia -- but it's disappearing fast
New research found that wild cousins of sorghum, the fifth-most important cereal crop globally, are most concentrated in Australia, despite having been domesticated in Africa.

When businesses behave badly
We've all heard of corporate social responsibility, but what happens when companies do the opposite?

Is it better to give than receive?
Young children who have experienced compassionate love and empathy from their mothers may be more willing to turn thoughts into action by being generous to others, a University of California, Davis, study suggests.

Air pollution spikes linked to lower test scores for Salt Lake County third graders
More frequent exposure to air pollution spikes were associated with reduced test scores for third graders in Salt Lake County.

Transportation of water into the deep Earth by Al-phase D
Researchers at Ehime University have recently measured the propagation speed of ultrasonic waves in an aluminum-rich hydrous mineral called Al-phase D at pressure conditions relevant to the Earth's deep mantle.

UIC researchers identify new process to produce ammonia with a much smaller carbon footprint
Researchers describe a new process to produce ammonia with a potentially much lower carbon footprint.

Link found between drought and HIV among women in less-developed countries
Lehigh University Professor Kelly Austin explores the consequences of drought and lack of environmental resources on women in less-developed countries.
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