Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

December 01, 2020
Automatic deep-learning AI tool measures volume of cerebral ventricles on MRIs in children
Researchers from multiple institutions in North America have developed a fully automated, deep-learning (DL), artificial-intelligence clinical tool that can measure the volume of cerebral ventricles on magnetic resonance images (MRIs) in children within about 25 minutes.

Tweaking carotenoid genes helps tomatoes bring their a-game
Researchers led by the University of Tsukuba demonstrated that Target-AID gene editing technology can be used to simultaneously introduce single-base changes into multiple genes in tomatoes.

The (un)social network: The emergence of digital thought clones and what to do about them
A groundbreaking study published in Information & Communications Technology Law by experts at the Centre for Law and Development at Qatar University discusses the legal and ethical implications of Big Tech's development of ''digital thought clones.'' Digital thought clones can allow technology companies to accurately predict and influence people's behavior according to their digital habits.

Climate change warms groundwater in Bavaria
Groundwater reservoirs in Bavaria have warmed considerably over the past few decades.

Clothing, tattoos could be used to monitor patient health
A shirt that monitors your blood pressure or a pair of socks that can keep track of your cholesterol levels might be just a few years away from becoming reality.

Pets, touch and COVID-19: why our furry friends are lifesavers
A new study published by University of South Australia researchers points to the lifesaving role that pets have played in 2020 and why governments need to sit up and take notice.

Post-COVID pain or weakness? Request an ultrasound or MRI
A new Northwestern Medicine study shows how advanced imaging technology can pinpoint what may have caused patients' nerve damage and help determine the best course of treatment.

Scientists warn of the social and environmental risks tied to the energy transition
New international research by the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) warns that green energy projects can be as socially and environmentally conflictive as fossil fuel projects.

National Autism Indicators Report: health and health care of individuals with autism
In the recently published sixth report in the National Autism Indicators Report series, researchers from Drexel University's A.J.

Ongoing anticoagulant treatment does not seem to protect against severe COVID-19
DOAC (direct oral anticoagulant) pills are used in the treatment of atrial fibrillation by preventing blood clots.

Octapharma USA presents bleeding disorders research at virtual ASH annual meeting
Octapharma USA will present its most recent rare bleeding disorders research initiatives during the 62nd American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition, a virtual medical congress to be held December 5 - 8.

Molecule that regulates muscle adaptation to exercise is discovered
An article in Cell shows that the metabolite succinate is released by muscle cells during physical exercise and triggers a process of tissue remodeling that makes muscles stronger and enhances metabolic efficiency.

Alcohol-free hand sanitizer just as effective against COVID as alcohol-based versions
A new study from researchers at Brigham Young University finds that alcohol-free hand sanitizer is just as effective at disinfecting surfaces from the COVID-19 virus as alcohol-based products.

The new generation solar, developed by TalTech, cells contribute to the green revolution
The European Union is determined to undertake a major reform known as the European Green Deal.

City of Hope developed cancer-killing virus: activates immune system against colon cancer
A cancer-killing virus that City of Hope scientists developed could one day improve the immune system's ability to eradicate tumors in colon cancer patients, reports a new study in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics.

'Anti-antibiotic' allows for use of antibiotics without driving resistance
An inexpensive, FDA-approved drug -- cholestyramine -- taken in conjunction with an antibiotic prevents the antibiotic from driving antimicrobial resistance, according to new research by scientists at Penn State and the University of Michigan.

Scientists identify new genetic MND risk factor in junk DNA
Researchers from the University of Sheffield have identified a new genetic risk factor for Motor Neurone Disease (MND).

Out of many COVID-19 tests, which one to choose?
Curbing the coronavirus pandemic relies heavily on how quickly a potentially exposed individual can be tested and quarantined.

AI predicts which drug combinations kill cancer cells
A machine learning model developed in Finland can help us treat cancer more effectively.

New device offers faster way to detect antibiotic-resistant bacteria
A new device for faster testing of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has been developed by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Ultrasensitive transistor for herbicide detection in water
University of Tokyo researchers have fabricated a tiny electronic sensor that can detect very low levels of a commonly used weed killer in drinking water.

In a holiday season unlike any other, avoid unfounded claims about suicide
The holiday season usually has the lowest monthly suicide rates.

Repurposed mouse model sheds light on loss of smell in COVID-19
A repurposed mouse model can develop symptoms of both severe COVID-19 (lung damage, blood clots, abnormal blood vessels, and death) and also of milder disease, including loss of the sense of smell, according to a recent University of Iowa study published in Nature.

Weak police, strong democracy: civic ritual and performative peace in contemporary Taiwan
Looking at a case study of Taiwanese police interacting with a powerful local union, the author explores ''weak policing.''

'Artificial Pancreas Dashboard' to standardize hybrid closed-loop reporting
A standardized ''Artificial Pancreas (AP) Dashboard'' should provide easy to use single-page hybrid closed-loop system (HCL) reporting for insulin requiring patients with diabetes.

Retinal transplant boost opens door to treat eyesight loss
Researchers have identified two cell signals - Ccr5 and Cxcr6 - that are sent out by dying retinal cells to recruit stem cells and repair eye damage.

Selecting best microalgae for biodiesel production
Microalgae are a promising source of energy to replace fossil fuels, as they have several advantages over conventional crops used for commercial biodiesel.

Curtin collision models impact the future of energy
A new Curtin University-created database of electron-molecule reactions is a major step forward in making nuclear fusion power a reality, by allowing researchers to accurately model plasmas containing molecular hydrogen.

New childhood dementia insight
Is the eye a window to the brain in Sanfilippo syndrome, an untreatable form of childhood-onset dementia, Australian researchers ask in a new publication.

Watching the Arctic thaw in fast-forward
The frozen permafrost in the Arctic is thawing on an alarming scale.

Why long-suffering hosts grow a thick skin
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have shown that the skin fibrosis seen in chronic graft-versus-host disease is mediated by transforming growth factor-β1 expressed by epidermal cells undergoing programmed death when they are stimulated by interferon-γ.

CU Anschutz researcher offers new theory on `Venus' figurines
One of world's earliest examples of art, the enigmatic `Venus' figurines carved some 30,000 years ago, have intrigued and puzzled scientists for nearly two centuries.

How the insect got its wings: Scientists (at last!) tell the tale
How insect wings evolved has puzzled biologists for over a century.

The shorter the delay, the more effective the neurofeedback
HSE University scientists have for the first time in the world investigated the impact of delayed reinforcement signals in neurofeedback (NFB) training.

Older adults in wealthier countries drink more alcohol
A new global study finds older people in wealthy countries consume more alcohol than their counterparts in middle-income countries, on average, although a higher cost of alcohol is associated with less frequent drinking.

Drug reverses age-related cognitive decline within days
Just a few doses of an experimental drug can reverse age-related declines in memory and mental flexibility in mice, according to a new study by UC San Francisco scientists.

Warning signs over effectiveness of HIV 'wonder drug' in sub-Saharan Africa
Dolutegravir, the current first-line treatment for HIV, may not be as effective as hoped in sub-Saharan Africa, suggests new research published on World AIDS Day.

During the coronavirus pandemic, radio has proved to be the medium of reference
An article by the researchers Emma Rodero, director of the Media Psychology Lab at the Department of Communication, and María Blanco-Hernández, of the International University of La Rioja, published in Index.comunicación, affirms the influence of radio in crisis situations and especially during the covid-19 epidemic.

Scientists solve big limitation of stratospheric balloon payloads
Nearly all photons emitted after the Big Bang are now visible only at far-infrared wavelengths.

Pumping a nanoparticle to lase at low power
A laser pointer small enough to get inside a cancer cell and stop its 'engine'?

Tunable rainbow light trapping in ultrathin resonator arrays
Light squeezed into nanoscale metallic gaps has a myriad of applications in sensing, energy, and nonlinear optics.

Watch immune cells dig tunnels in tissues
White blood cells called cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) dig tunnels in tissues, potentially allowing other CTLs to quickly reach infected cells and tumor cells, researchers report December 1st in Biophysical Journal.

Octogenarian snapper found in WA becomes oldest tropical reef fish by two decades
An 81-year-old midnight snapper caught off the coast of Western Australia has taken the title of the oldest tropical reef fish recorded anywhere in the world.

Molecular 'barcode' helps decide which sperm will reach an egg
A protein called CatSper1 may act as a molecular 'barcode' that helps determine which sperm cells will make it to an egg and which are eliminated along the way.

New immunotherapeutic approach takes aim at cancer's enzyme shield
A Brigham team observed that in a range of mouse models, inhibiting the protein SerpinB9 with a small molecule reduced tumor growth both by weakening the tumor's defense mechanisms and by triggering cell death in the tumors themselves.

Scientists discover role of protein in detecting the common cold virus
The role of a protein in detecting the common cold virus and kickstarting an immune response to fight infection has been uncovered by a team of scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) and the National University of Singapore.

Cancer cases are rising in adolescents and young adults
Cancer cases in adolescents and young adults have risen by 30% during the last four decades, with kidney cancer rising at the greatest rate, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine.

SLC25A51 regulates the transport of the coenzyme NAD into the mitochondria
Scientists at CeMM have now discovered that the previously uncharacterized protein SLC25A51 acts as a transporter into the mitochondria for the coenzyme NAD.

Lab results don't explain 'obesity paradox,' but bias may
Results of standard laboratory tests performed on adult outpatients to provide an overall picture of their health are fairly consistent between those with obesity and their leaner counterparts, investigators report.

European colonization accelerated erosion tenfold
Rates of soil erosion and alluvium accumulation in North America accelerated 10-fold after Europeans colonized the continent, according to new research carried out by scientists from China, Belgium and USA.

Some primary school-aged children self-harm, prompting calls for earlier intervention
New research reveals that some primary school-aged children have self-harmed, prompting calls for intervention efforts to start earlier.

Multi-center, multi-tracer PET studies harmonized to detect neuroinflammation in ALS
A novel ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) study has pooled data from multiple sites to effectively visualize neuroinflammation, which is key to developing drugs to treat the disease.

Shrinking massive neural networks used to model language
Deep learning neural networks can be massive, demanding major computing power.

Football-loving states slow to enact youth concussion laws
States with college teams in strong conferences, in particular the Southeastern Conference (SEC), were among the last to take up regulations on youth concussions, according to a recent study.

CRISPR tagging improves accuracy of model cells grown from stem cells
CRISPR tags are being used to identify all of the transcription factors necessary to turn a pluripotent stem cell into a suitable adult cell for research, and possible future cell therapies.

Flashy lizards are more attractive to mates and to predators
In the lizard world, flashy colors attract the interest of females looking for mates.

SMART researchers develop customised targeting of bacteria using lysins
Researchers from SMART have developed a method to produce engineered lysins that can be used to selectively kill bacteria of interest while leaving others unharmed.

How are older adults coping with the mental health effects of COVID-19?
Recent studies indicate that older adults may be withstanding the mental health strains of the COVID-19 pandemic better than other age groups.

Glucosamine may reduce overall death rates as effectively as regular exercise
Glucosamine supplements may reduce overall mortality about as well as regular exercise does, according to a new epidemiological study from West Virginia University.

Treating brain diseases now possible
POSTECH research team led by Professor Kyong-Tai Kim uncovers the mechanism that regulates local expression of key molecules in brain development and neurodegenerative diseases.

Army researchers look to reduce rotorcraft noise
Imagine a silent helicopter stealthily moving troops and supplies around a future battlefield.

Cannabidiol (CBD) in cannabis does not impair driving, landmark study shows
New research shows from the Lambert Initiative at the University of Sydney shows that cannabidiol is safe for driving and the intoxicating effects of THC in cannabis fade in hours.

Danish researchers develop budget optical ammonia sensor
In collaboration with the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), the Department of Engineering at Aarhus University has developed photonic sensor technology that can pave the way for a portable, reliable and, above all, inexpensive device for detecting ammonia and other gases in agriculture.

Meningococcus B vaccine prevents disease with 79 per cent effectiveness in under-18s
Meningococcus group B, the most prevalent strain of meningococcal infection, is prevented with 79 per cent effectiveness in children and young adults inoculated with the 4CMenB vaccine, also known as Bexsero, according to a new collaborative study from researchers in Portugal and the UK and led by the University of Bristol which evaluated the vaccine's performance in a real-world setting.

LSU Health New Orleans discovers drug development target for retinal dystrophies
A team of LSU Health New Orleans researchers reports for the first time that deleting one of the inhibitors of the RPE65 gene in a mouse model that carries a human disease mutation prevents degeneration of cone photoreceptors that are used for daytime high-resolution color vision.

Plants on aspirin
For centuries humans were using willow barks to treat a headache or an inflamed tooth.

ASM journals build mechanisms to promote gender equity
ASM journal editors and staff seek to improve gender equity after analysis shows that women are not only underrepresented but receive more negative outcomes.

Next step in simulating the universe
Researchers led by the University of Tsukuba developed a way to accurately represent the behavior of elementary particles called neutrinos in computer simulations of the Universe.

RUDN University mathematician suggested new approach to cooperative game
A mathematician from RUDN University developed a matrix representation of set functions.

Study finds false widow spiders bite can transmit harmful antibiotic-resistant bacteria
A team of zoologists and microbiologists from NUI Galway have published a new study showing that common house spiders carry bacteria susceptible to infect people, with the Noble False Widow spiders also carrying harmful strains resistant to common antibiotic treatments.

Statins can save lives, are they being used?
People who have coronary artery disease, stroke or peripheral artery disease often are prescribed a statin, a cholesterol-lowering drug that reduces the risk of heart attack or stroke.

How automated vehicles can impede driver performance, and what to do about it
A University of Toronto Engineering study is underscoring the importance of drivers keeping their eyes on the road -- even when they are in an automated vehicle (AV).

Vitamin D regulates calcium in intestine differently than previously thought
A Rutgers study has discovered that vitamin D regulates calcium in a section of the intestine that previously was thought not to have played a key role.

Adults with overweight or obesity often don't recognize they have a weight problem
A cross-sectional analysis of NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) data found that more than 40% of U.S. adults with overweight and nearly 10% with obesity did not consider themselves to be overweight.

AI reduces computational time required to study fate of molecules exposed to light
Light-induced processes are critical in transformative technologies such as solar energy harvesting, as well as in photomedicine and photoresponsive materials.

Increasing HPV vaccine uptake in adolescents
More than 90 percent of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers could be prevented by widespread uptake of the HPV vaccine.

Virus-like probes could help make rapid COVID-19 testing more accurate, reliable
Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed new and improved probes, known as positive controls, that could make it easier to validate rapid, point-of-care diagnostic tests for COVID-19 across the globe.

Study suggests metabolism influences parasite's resistance to drugs
New insight on how a parasite can resist current therapies has been published today in the open-access eLife journal.

Study identifies novel mechanisms that cause protein clumping in brain diseases
A team of researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has taken a major step toward understanding the mechanisms involved in the formation of large clumps of tau protein, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and several other neurodegenerative disorders.

Long-term data shows racial & ethnic disparities in effectiveness of anti-smoking measures
Tobacco control efforts have reduced cigarette smoking for many, but those efforts have disproportionately helped white smokers, while other racial and ethnic groups are still struggling, an Oregon State University researcher's analysis found.

Cancer cells 'remove blindfold' to spread
Cells are effectively 'blindfolded' as they lose sensitivity to their surroundings early in cancer progression, but scientists used a new method to find some cancer cells are able to switch this sense back on in order to move and spread.

Why people become defensive and how to address it
Research published in the British Journal of Social Psychology has shown that defensiveness in response to wrongdoing is exacerbated by making the wrong doer feel like they're an outcast.

Early human landscape modifications discovered in Amazonia
New research argues that the theories of extensive savannah formations in the South-western Amazonia during the current Holocene period are based on a false interpretation of the connection between charcoal accumulation and natural fires due to drier climatic periods.

First report card on biosimilars in oncology
In a Policy Review in The Lancet Oncology, Y. Tony Yang, a professor at the George Washington University School of Nursing and Milken Institute School of Public Health, along with his co-authors, identify factors preventing the effective launch of oncology biosimilars in the United States, including the struggle to garner market share and fighting patent litigation lawsuits across the country.

For people with certain BRCA mutations, activating the immune system could be promising treatment
Tumors with mutations in the BRCA2 cancer-predisposition gene respond better to checkpoint blockade immunotherapy than tumors with mutations in BRCA1, scientists at Memorial Sloan Kettering have found.

Stimulus relief funds increase social distancing to stop spread of COVID-19
New research suggests that that those suffering from economic hardships are less likely comply with new stay-at-home orders; however, these same U.S. residents would be more likely to adhere to the new public health guidelines if their households received stimulus funds.

More evidence that cellular 'death by iron' could be promising avenue of cancer treatment
Genetic mutations that give cancers a metabolic boost may also leave them vulnerable to drugs that promote a particular form of cell death, Sloan Kettering Institute researchers have found.

Children with dyslexia show stronger emotional responses
Children diagnosed with dyslexia show greater emotional reactivity than children without dyslexia, according to a new collaborative study by UC San Francisco neuroscientists with the UCSF Dyslexia Center and UCSF Memory and Aging Center.

Deciphering the energetic code of cells for better anticancer therapies
A procedure that may help personalise anticancer therapies has just been developed by the CNRS, INSERM, and Aix-Marseille University scientists in association with colleagues from the University of California San Francisco and the Marseille Public University Hospital System (AP-HM), with support from Canceropôle Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur.

Obesity increases the risk of early hip fracture in postmenopausal women
Obese women have an increased risk of hip fracture earlier than others, already well before the age of 70, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.

Hydrogen-powered heavy duty vehicles could contribute significantly to achieving climate goals
A partial transition of German road transport to hydrogen energy is among the possibilities being discussed to help meet national climate targets.

IU researchers publish first article dedicated to Hoosier youth's donated tumor
Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine have published their work about a specific type of childhood cancer in the peer-reviewed, international oncology journal, Cancers.

Genomic analysis of mako shark reveals genes relating to tumor suppression in humans
Genetic mapping of the shark's liver and eye tissue showed overexpression of nine genes known for action in tumor suppression, wound healing, and probable monochrome vision.

Environmental exposures affect therapeutic drugs
Humans are exposed to various environmental or dietary molecules that can attenuate or even increase the effect of therapeutic drugs.

Chemical memory in plants affects chances of offspring survival
Researchers at the University of Warwick have uncovered the mechanism that allows plants to pass on their 'memories' to offspring, which results in growth and developmental defects.

Cost of planting, protecting trees to fight climate change could jump
Planting trees and preventing deforestation are considered key climate change mitigation strategies, but a new analysis finds the cost of preserving and planting trees to hit certain global emissions reductions targets could accelerate quickly.

New study links number of menopause symptoms with job performance
With a large percentage of women in the workplace aged between 40 and 59 years, the challenge of women managing menopause symptoms while at work is commonplace.

Engaging family caregivers key to coordinated home health care
After Jo-Ana Chase heard her mother had successful heart surgery, she was relieved when her mom was finally discharged from the hospital and sent home to be cared for by her brother.

Tomato's wild ancestor is a genomic reservoir for plant breeders
Today's tomatoes are larger and easier to farm than their wild ancestor, but they also are less resistant to disease and environmental stresses like drought and salty soil.

After 100 years, Cornell University plant pathologists revisit fire blight hypothesis
Historically credited as being the first bacterium ever characterized as a plant pathogen, fire blight is a bacterial disease that leads to significant losses of pear and apple.

Rock-a-bye fly: Why vibrations lead to sleepiness
Researchers discover that gentle vibration can induce sleep in flies through a simple form of learning

Breaking the rules of chemistry unlocks new reaction
Scientists have broken the rules of enzyme engineering to unlock a new method for creating chemical reactions that could unlock a wide range of new applications -- from creating new drugs to food production.

Researchers study influence of cultural factors on gesture design
Freehand gesture-based interfaces in interactive systems are becoming more common, but what if your preferred way to gesture a command - say, changing the TV to channel 10 - significantly differed from that of a user from another culture?

KU Leuven vaccine candidate protects against Covid-19 and yellow fever
KU Leuven researchers published results of their vaccine candidate, a vector vaccine based on the yellow fever vaccine.

Study sheds light on immune mechanism that triggers cytokine storm typical of COVID-19
In lung tissue from a person who died after contracting COVID-19, active inflammasomes (puncta, represented as red specks) can be seen in some cells.

AI-based 'OxyGAN' is a robust, effective method to measure tissue oxygen levels
In a new study published in the Journal of Biomedical Optics, researchers from Johns Hopkins University, Mason T.

A semiconductor chip detects antigen concentrations at 1 parts per quadrillion molar mass
A chip, which can sense antigens at one part per quadrillion molar mass, was created.

Skoltech scientists run a 'speed test' to boost production of carbon nanotubes
Skoltech researchers have investigated the procedure for catalyst delivery used in the most common method of carbon nanotube production, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), offering what they call a ''simple and elegant'' way to boost productivity and pave the way for cheaper and more accessible nanotube-based technology.

What will the climate be like when earth's next supercontinent forms?
The continents will reunite again in the deep future. And a new study, presented today during an online poster session at the meeting of the American Geophysical Union, suggests that the future arrangement of this supercontinent could dramatically impact the habitability and climate stability of Earth.

New research reveals 'megatrends' that will affect forests in the next decade
A group of experts from academic, governmental and international organisations have identified five large-scale 'megatrends' affecting forests and forest communities, published today in Nature Plants.

Bleach-alternative COVID-19 surface disinfectants may pollute indoor air: USask research
Cleaning surfaces with hydrogen peroxide-based disinfectants has the potential to pollute the air and pose a health risk, according to research led by University of Saskatchewan (USask).

Story tips from Johns Hopkins experts on Covid-19
Story tips from Johns Hopkins experts on Covid-19.

Telomere shortening protects against cancer
Researchers have found the first evidence that telomere shortening is not just a sign of aging, but a key component of the body's cancer prevention system.

Seismic activity of New Zealand's alpine fault more complex than suspected
New evidence of a 19th century earthquake on New Zealand's Alpine fault suggests that in at least one portion of the fault, smaller earthquakes may occur in between such large rupture events.

Oncotarget launches special collection on breast cancer
Breast Cancer Collection published in honor of breast cancer awareness.

Story tips: Air taxis, fungi speak, radiation game and climate collab
ORNL story tips: Air taxis, fungi speak, radiation game and climate collab.

Geoscientists use zircon to trace origin of Earth's continents
Geoscientists have long known that some parts of the continents formed in the Earth's deep past, but the speed in which land rose above global seas -- and the exact shapes that land masses formed -- have so far eluded experts.

Kids' TV teaching children wrong lessons about pain -- new study
New analysis of children's TV and film suggests that too often it portrays pain as something arising only through violent act or injury when instead it could do more to educate young people about much more common, everyday pain.

How to spot winning sperm: examine their racing stripes
Millions of sperm enter the race to fertilize, but only one wins the sprint to the egg.

COVID-19 may deepen depression, anxiety, and PTSD among pregnant and postpartum women
In a new study, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital surveyed pregnant women and those who had recently given birth, finding concerning rates of depression, generalized anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, which were found to be exacerbated by COVID-19-related grief and health worries.

Obesity changes cell response to glucose, uses slower metabolic path in mouse liver
Healthy cells and cells with Type 2 diabetes use completely different pathways to manage blood sugar levels, according to results from a study in mice.

Trees can help slow climate change, but at a cost
Widespread forest management and protections against deforestation can help mitigate climate change - but will come with a steep cost if deployed as broadly as policymakers have discussed, new research suggests.

New method sees fibers in 3D, uses it to estimate conductivity
Designing a vehicle that can drive away the heat that is generated around it when traveling at hypersonic speeds requires an understanding of the thermal properties of the materials used to construct it.

Targets for avoidable sight loss 'not being met': 30-year study finds
A new global study has found no significant reduction in the number of people with treatable sight loss since 2010.

Psychology research shows 'water cooler talk' can have big benefits
In settings where people are working together on a task, making time for small talk allows for a newly-described behavior called ''reciprocity in conversation,'' which is associated with higher levels of task enjoyment.

NTU Singapore study suggests self-determination as key to avoid caregiver burden
A Singapore study of family caregivers of the terminally ill suggests that self-determination is the key factor that can protect them from caregiver burden -- a negative state impacting a carer's wellbeing.

Researchers validate theory that neutrinos shape the universe
A research team including Kavli IPMU Principal Investigator Naoki Yoshida has, in a world first, succeeded in performing a 6-dimensional simulation of neutrinos moving through the universe.

Electronic waste on the decline, new study finds
A new study, led by a researcher at the Yale School of the Environment's Center for Industrial Ecology and published recently in the Journal of Industrial Ecology, has found that the total mass of electronic waste generated by Americans has been declining since 2015.

How thyroid function affects stress-related heart problems
Chest pain, shortness of breath, heart flutter and palpitations: these symptoms are not only characteristic of a heart attack, but can also be caused by another, as yet little researched condition.

Study finds COVID-19 hindering US academic productivity of faculty with young children
The academic productivity of higher education faculty In the United States in the science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) fields with very young children suffered as a result of the stay-at-home orders during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, the University of Florida College of Medicine, and the University of Michigan School of Medicine.
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