Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

December 03, 2020
Cooling electronics efficiently with graphene-enhanced heat pipes
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have found that graphene-based heat pipes can help solve the problems of cooling electronics and power systems used in avionics, data centres, and other power electronics.

Researchers confront optics and data-transfer challenges with 3D-printed lens
Researchers have developed new 3D-printed microlenses with adjustable refractive indices - a property that gives them highly specialized light-focusing abilities.

Chicago neighborhoods with barriers to social distancing had higher COVID-19 death rates
New research has found that Chicago neighborhoods with barriers to social distancing, including limited access to broadband internet and low rates of health insurance, had more COVID-19 deaths in spring 2020.

Teamwork, rapid data monitoring needed to improve nation's heart health
Collecting and promptly analyzing heart health and treatment data can help experts understand what healthcare delivery changes are needed to improve heart health.

What makes psoriasis sore: Novel role of immune system in the disease
More than 130 million people around the globe suffer from psoriasis vulgaris, a chronic condition characterized by skin inflammation, scales, and dry patches.

Gastric bypass surgery leads to long-term diabetes remission
More than half of adults with obesity had long-term diabetes remission following gastric bypass surgery, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Octapharma presents research on congenital & acquired bleeding disorders at ASH Meeting
Octapharma USA will present multiple clinical research posters focused on the efficacy and safety of fibryga®, Fibrinogen (Human) Lyophilized Powder for Reconstitution, for Intravenous Use in the treatment of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders during the 62nd American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition, a virtual medical congress to be held December 5 - 8, 2020.

Understanding bacteria's metabolism could improve biofuel production
A new study reveals how bacteria control the chemicals produced from consuming 'food.' The insight could lead to organisms that are more efficient at converting plants into biofuels.

3D protein modeling suggests why COVID-19 infects some animals, but not others
Some animals are more susceptible to Covid-19 infection than others, and new research suggests this may be due to distinctive structural features of a protein found on the surface of animal cells.

Voyager spacecraft detect new type of solar electron burst
The Voyager spacecraft continue to make discoveries even as they travel through interstellar space.

Predicting breast cancer recurrences
A new tool combining traditional pathology with machine learning could predict which breast cancer patients actually need surgery.

Researchers developed a sequence analysis pipeline for virus discovery
A novel bioinformatics pipeline identifies both previously known and novel viruses.

Anorexia patients tolerate rapid weight gain with meal-based behavioral support
A new study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers of adults hospitalized for the eating disorder anorexia nervosa has strengthened the case for promoting rapid weight gain as part of overall efforts.

Higher frequency of financial reporting hinders corporate innovation
Research shows that more regular financial reporting increases managerial myopia and stifles innovation.

Not enough Hazelnuts? Our future climate points to Australia for new cultivations
The food industry is looking for new areas that are suitable for hazelnut farming to satisfy a growing global demand and to diversify supply.

Proverbial wolf can't blow down modern timber high-rises, says UBCO researcher
With an increasing demand for a more sustainable alternative for high-rise construction, new research from UBC Okanagan, in collaboration with Western University and FPInnovations, points to timber as a sustainable and effective way to make tall, high-density, and renewable buildings.

Scientists predict 'optimal' stress levels
Scientists have created an evolutionary model to predict how animals should react in stressful situations.

Study proves bits of DNA in seawater correlate to the weight of netted fish
A breakthrough study proves DNA in seawater reveals not just species diversity but the relative biomass of ocean fish roughly as well as a ''gold standard'' US state government trawl with nets.

Adaptive Image Receive (AIR) coil from GE shows promise for whole-brain imaging
According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), a prototype 16-channel head Adaptive Image Receive (AIR) radiofrequency coil from GE Healthcare outperformed a conventional 8-channel head coil for in vivo whole-brain imaging, though it did not perform as well as a conventional 32-channel head coil.

Gaia: astronomers to release most accurate data ever for nearly two billion stars
On 3 December 2020 an international team of astronomers will announce the most detailed ever catalogue of the stars in a huge swathe of our Milky Way galaxy.

Flightless bird species at risk of extinction
Bird species that have lost the ability to fly through evolution have become extinct more often than birds that have retained their ability to fly, according to new research from the University of Gothenburg.

Robot fleet dives for climate answers in 'marine snow'
Sailing from Hobart, twenty researchers aboard CSIRO's RV Investigator hope to capture the most detailed picture yet of how marine life in the Southern Ocean captures and stores carbon from the atmosphere.

Ancient migration was choice, not chance
The degree of intentionality behind ancient ocean migrations, such as that to the Ryukyu Islands between Taiwan and mainland Japan, has been widely debated.

Study finds gamblers ignore important information when placing bet
People with gambling problems are less likely to consider important information that could prevent them from losing, according to new research published today from the UBC's Centre for Gambling Research.

Tire-related chemical is largely responsible for adult coho salmon deaths in urban streams
A team led by researchers at the University of Washington Tacoma, UW and Washington State University Puyallup have discovered a chemical that kills coho salmon in urban streams before the fish can spawn.

Tech makes it possible to digitally communicate through human touch
Researchers have developed the first technology capable of sending digital information, such as a photo or password, by touching a surface with your finger.

Researchers identify the bacteria that can make the Bolson tortoise become ill
The Bolson tortoise is a species indigenous to the Chihuahua desert in Mexico and is endangered.

Geisinger researchers explore safety of ventilator sharing to mitigate equipment shortages
Using a single ventilator to support two patients could be feasible in crisis situations involving a ventilator shortage, researchers have found.

Outbreak investigation reveals "super-spreader" potential of Andes virus
''Super-spreader'' events and extensive person-to-person contact propelled an outbreak of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in a small village in Argentina from 2018-2019, according to research published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. An international scientific team reports the genetic, clinical, and epidemiologic features of the outbreak caused by the Andes virus, a member of the hantavirus family.

Physicists capture the sound of a "perfect" fluid
MIT physicists have observed sound waves moving through a ''perfect'' fluid.

How plants compete for underground real estate affects climate change and food production
How do plant roots store carbon? Princeton researchers found that the energy a plant devotes to its roots depends on proximity to other plants: when close together, plants heavily invest in their root systems to compete for finite underground resources; if far apart, they invest less.

UBC study explores link between social status and trust in decision-makers
A recent study examining perceptions of power suggests that individuals with lower socioeconomic statuses are more likely to have a negative view of policy or decision-makers.

Scientists peer into the 3D structure of the Milky Way
Scientists from Cardiff University have helped produce a brand-new, three-dimensional survey of our galaxy, allowing them to peer into the inner structure and observe its star-forming processes in unprecedented detail.

Gaia space telescope measured the acceleration of the Solar System
The Gaia space telescope has measured the acceleration of the Solar System when it orbits the center of our Milky Way galaxy.

Gut microbiome snapshot could reveal chemical exposures in children
Researchers have completed the most comprehensive study to date on how a class of persistent pollutants called semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are associated with the gut microbiome in human children.

Correctly delivered and integrated: How proteins find their place in the cell
Over a quarter of all proteins in a cell are found in the membrane.

New COVID surveillance predicts direction, speed and acceleration of virus
A new COVID-19 global surveillance system has been developed which can dynamically track not just where the virus is now, but where it is going, how fast it will arrive and whether that speed is accelerating.

Oral drug blocks SARS-CoV-2 transmission, Georgia State biomedical sciences researchers find
Treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection with a new antiviral drug, MK-4482/EIDD-2801 or Molnupiravir, completely suppresses virus transmission within 24 hours, researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University have discovered.

Army computer models unveil secret to quieter small drones
It's no secret the US Army wants its small unmanned aerial systems to operate quietly in densely-populated regions, but tests to achieve this can be expensive, time-consuming and labor-intensive according to researchers.

Most countries are violating international law during the COVID-19 pandemic: Legal experts
In 2019, the Global Health Law Consortium, hosted at York U, analyzed key aspects of the International Health Regulations (IHR) to authoritatively interpret what countries are legally allowed to do during public health crises like Ebola & SARS.

Daily data from COVID app predicts local incidence and prevalence of virus
Published today in The Lancet Public Health, a study by researchers at King's College London research team detail the modelling behind the ZOE COVID Symptom Study App.

Wind farm and sleep disruption
As wind power generation becomes more important, experts in Australia are examining whether wind 'farm' turbine background noise in the environmental can affect sleep and wellbeing of nearby residents.

Patients with kidney disease may delay AVF creation
Many patients start hemodialysis with temporary vascular access despite regular kidney care and pre-dialysis education.

Tree lifespan decline in forests could neutralize part of rise in net carbon uptake
Study by Brazilian researchers reported in Nature Communications shows that trees are growing faster in forests worldwide, including the Amazon, but their lives are getting shorter

Johns Hopkins team develops software that cuts time, cost from gene sequencing
A team of Johns Hopkins University researchers has developed a new software that could revolutionize how DNA is sequenced, making it far faster and less expensive to map anything from yeast genomes to cancer genes.

Comparison of coronavirus antibody tests revealed too optimistic claims
A study by University of Tartu researchers indicates that the sensitivity of tests used to detect viral antibodies in a blood sample may differ significantly.

Mortality rate after cancer surgery drops, but gap persists between Black and white patients
Mortality rates after cancer surgery declined for Black as well as white patients during a recent ten-year period, although the mortality gap between the two groups did not narrow, according to new research by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard University investigators.

How the vaginal microbiome may affect HIV prevention
Healthy Lactobacillus bacteria in the vagina are critical for women's health, but the accumulation of additional bacterial genera can imbalance the vaginal ecosystem.

People with rare autoimmune diseases at increased risk of dying during COVID-19 pandemic
A new study, led by experts from the University of Nottingham, has shown that people with rare autoimmune rheumatic diseases are at a greater risk of dying at a younger age during the COVID-19 pandemic.

A new era is dawning in diagnosing sexually transmitted infections in men
Researchers and doctors from the University of Tartu and Tartu University Hospital evaluated the use of a novel revolutionary method, flow cytometry, for diagnosing urethritis in Estonian men.

Vaccination against tuberculosis can reduce the spread of COVID-19 and ease its course
St Petersburg University scientists have analysed about 100 academic papers and statistics on the incidence of COVID-19 in different countries of the world.

Shuttering fossil fuel power plants may cost less than expected
Decarbonizing US electricity production will require both construction of renewable energy sources and retirement of power plants now operated by fossil fuels.

How a police contact by middle school leads to different outcomes for Black, white youth
A new University of Washington study finds that Black youth are more likely than white youth to be treated as 'usual suspects' after a first encounter with police, leading to subsequent arrests over time.

Pilot whale study reveals copycat calls to outsmart predators
New Curtin University research has found southern Australian long-finned pilot whales are able to mimic the calls of its natural predator and food rival - the killer whale, as a possible ploy to outsmart it.

Archaeology: Palaeolithic sea voyage to Japanese islands beyond the horizon
Modern humans may have deliberately crossed the sea to migrate to the Ryukyu Islands of southwestern Japan, even though the islands would not have been visible on the horizon when they set out, according to a study published Scientific Reports.

The impact of Neandertal DNA on human health
A researcher at the University of Tartu described new associations between Neandertal DNA and autoimmune diseases, prostate cancer and type 2 diabetes.

What makes certain groups more vulnerable to COVID-19?
What makes the elderly and people with underlying conditions more vulnerable to COVID-19?

Genetically engineered T cells could lead to therapies for autoimmune diseases
University of Arizona Health Sciences immunobiologists have created a five-module chimeric antigen receptor T cell that is showing early potential to fight Type 1 diabetes.

New report details links between widespread ocean pollution and human health risks
The new study ''Human Health and Ocean Pollution'' presents a broad and comprehensive examination of the multiple dangers to human and ecosystem health posed by pollution of the seas.

Blackcurrants are favorable for glucose metabolism
Blackcurrants have a beneficial effect on post-meal glucose response, and the required portion size is much smaller than previously thought, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.

New map provides scientists with head start on how to destroy cancer-related enzymes
In a new paper in the journal Cell, investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute provide a guide to approximately 200 such kinases, the first comprehensive map for scientists working in a field expected to have a major impact on cancer treatment.

Researchers uncover significant reason older adults are at greater risk of heart attack
A team of surgeons has found an insufficient level of the protein Sesn2 is the reason older individuals are at greater risk of heart attack, which indicates stabilizing the protein could be the answer to maintaining a healthy heart.

K9 chemistry: A safer way to train detection dogs
Trained dogs are better at detecting explosives and narcotics than any technological device scientists have invented.

A plant immune receptor: It takes four to tango
A collaborative study on a plant intracellular immune receptor from researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ) not only shows how an important resistance protein is activated during pathogen infection but also reveals some common operational principles with immunity proteins from humans.

JNIS™: cuts in Medicare payments jeopardize patient access to care
The final 2021 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) issued this week by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will result in reimbursement cuts in the range of 10% for neurointerventional procedures, according to a detailed analysis published last week in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery™, the leading international peer-reviewed journal for the clinical field of neurointerventional surgery.

Drinking linked to a decline in brain health from cradle to grave
The evidence for the harmful effects of alcohol on brain health is compelling, but now experts have pin-pointed three key time periods in life when the effects of alcohol are likely to be at their greatest.

The helix of life: New study shows how 'our' RNA stably binds to artificial nucleic acids
Xeno nucleic acids are essential for the development of nucleic acid-based drugs.

Overdose-related cardiac arrests observed by emergency medical services during COVID-19 pandemic
Emerging changes in overdose-related cardiac arrests in the U.S. during the COVID-19 pandemic are described in this observational study using a large national emergency medical services database.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities
A new tool that uses light to map out the electronic structures of crystals could reveal the capabilities of emerging quantum materials and pave the way for advanced energy technologies and quantum computers, according to researchers at the University of Michigan, University of Regensburg and University of Marburg.

Titanium atom that exists in two places at once in crystal to blame for unusual phenomenon
Bombarding a crystal with neutrons reveals a quantum quirk that frustrates heat transfer.

Medicine-carriers made from human cells can cure lung infections
Scientists used human white blood cell membranes to carry two drugs, an antibiotic and an anti-inflammatory, directly to infected lungs in mice.

Better diabetes treatment: New insulin molecule can self-regulate blood sugar
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and biotech firm Gubra have developed a new insulin molecule that will make blood sugar regulation both easier and safer for those with type 1 diabetes.

Study finds over 64% of people reported new health issues during 'work from home'
In a new study, researchers have found that working from home has negatively impacted our physical health and mental health, increased work expectations and distractions, reduced our communications with co-workers and ultimately lessened our productivity.

Patients receiving low dose steroid at increased risk of cardiovascular disease
Glucocorticoids are steroids widely prescribed to treat a range of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.

New theory of root competition reveals rules governing growth
In the presence of competitors, plants overproduce roots to snatch up nearby resources but avoid foraging for nutrients near their neighbors, according to a new study, which provides a new theoretical foundation for understanding the rules that govern competitive root behavior.

Cluster of Alaskan islands could be single, interconnected giant volcano
small group of volcanic islands in Alaska's Aleutian chain might be part of a single, undiscovered giant volcano, say scientists presenting the findings Monday, 7 December at AGU's Fall Meeting 2020.

Reproduction key to maintenance of marimo shape
A team of scientists from Hokkaido University has suggested that marimo maintain their characteristic spherical shape due to the rarity of the formation of reproductive cells.

The same vision for all primates
Primates process visual information similar to pixels in a digital camera, using small computing units located in their visual cortex.

No 'one-size-fits-all solution' for children exposed to domestic violence, researchers say
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University surveyed 105 agencies throughout Ohio to better understand service, policy and research needs--and get feedback about potential strategies to protect children from intimate partner violence.

How hot is too hot for life deep below the ocean floor?
At what depth beneath the seabed does it become so hot that microbial life is no longer possible?

Can we make bones heal faster?
A new paper in Science Advances describes for the first time how minerals come together at the molecular level to form bones and other hard tissues, like teeth and enamel.

Role of birth order on career choice might have been overestimated in previous research
In a new study that could turn what we know about birth order upside down, a University of Houston researcher has found that the role of birth order on career types, occupational creativity and status attainment might have been overestimated in previous research.

Clinical trial results address concerns about pharmacogenetic testing
Researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial of pharmacogenetic testing related to cholesterol-lowering medications called statins.After one year, the cholesterol levels in the group who received their pharmacogenetic results were not higher than those in the group who did not receive their results, and they were not less likely to receive medical care meeting recommended guidelines.

Marine mammals' adaptations to low oxygen offer new perspective on COVID-19
When Terrie Williams began hearing about the wide range of symptoms experienced by patients with COVID-19, she saw a connection between the various ways the disease is affecting people and the many physiological adaptations that have enabled marine mammals to tolerate low oxygen levels during dives.

Huntsman Cancer Institute researchers identify promising drug combination for melanoma
Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have identified a potential drug combination to treat uveal melanoma, a type of eye cancer.

Can COVID-19 vaccine trials continue ethically once an efficacious candidate is found?
In a Perspective, David Wendler and colleagues propose guidance on when it can be ethical to continue placebo-controlled COVID-19 vaccine trials after an effective and safe candidate is found - a topic that is particularly relevant given the recent announcements of success in several late-stage clinical trials.

Potential means of improving learning and memory in people with mental illnesses
More than a dozen drugs are known to treat symptoms such as hallucinations, erratic behaviors, disordered thinking and emotional extremes associated with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses.

E-cigarette use by youth, young adults before, during COVID-19 pandemic
This survey study examines changes in the use of e-cigarettes by those 24 years old and younger during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Experimental study on the viscoelastic flow mixing in microfluidics
Experimental Study on the Viscoelastic Flow Mixing in Microfluidics https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0029 Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal.

Leaf microbiomes are a neighborhood affair in northern forests
Leaf microbiomes of sugar maple trees vary across the species' range, changing in accordance with the types of trees in the surrounding ''neighborhood.''

For nationalistic regimes, similar COVID-19 policies are the sincerest form of flattery
Analysis from a University of Texas at Arlington assistant professor of public policy suggests that nationalistic governments around the globe are more likely to copy other nationalistic governments in responding to the current pandemic.

New compact model for gene regulation in higher organisms
Genes can be turned on and off as needed to adapt to environmental changes.

Coasts drown as coral reefs collapse under warming and acidification
The coastal protection coral reefs currently provide will start eroding by the end of the century, as the world continues to warm and the oceans acidify.

COVID-19 advice may have reduced exposure to heart attack triggers
A new study suggests that COVID-19 guidance in Sweden may have reduced people's risks of having a heart attack.

A new view of how the brain decides to make an effort
Nature Human Behavior published the research by scientists at Emory University.

Photonics meets surface science in a cheap and accurate sensor for biological liquids
A new, simple, and inexpensive method of testing liquid biological samples that can be further developed to work in clinical settings, including real-time testing during surgery.

Common pipe alloy can form cancer-causing chemical in drinking water
Rusted iron pipes can react with residual disinfectants in drinking water distribution systems to produce carcinogenic hexavalent chromium in drinking water, reports a study by engineers at UC Riverside.

Research leads to better modeling of hypersonic flow
Designing a thermal protection system to keep astronauts and cargo safe requires an understanding at the molecular level of the complicated physics going on in the gas that flows around the vehicle.

How to cool more efficiently
In the journal Applied Physics Reviews (DOI: 10.1063/5.0020755), an international research team from the University of Barcelona, the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), and TU Darmstadt report on possibilities for implementing more efficient and environmentally friendly refrigeration processes.

Chemists get peek at novel fluorescence
Rice University chemists find a second level of fluorescence in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

Peanut treatment lowers risk of severe allergic reactions in preschoolers
This study is the first to demonstrate that exposing children to a small, regular dose of an allergen (in this case, peanuts) in a real-world setting (outside of a clinical trial) is effective in reducing the risk of allergic reactions.

Amino acid connected to NAFLD could provide treatment clues
Basic science research explores the effects of impaired glycine metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - and how to potentially use glycine-based treatment to help people with NAFLD.

High-definition brain prosthesis demonstrates artificial shape perception in monkeys
An implant packed with more than 1000 tiny, brain-stimulating electrodes generates recognizable perceptions of motion and complex shapes - including letters of the alphabet - in a monkey's mind.

Researchers create ingredients to produce food by 3D printing
Food engineers in Brazil and France developed gels based on modified starch for use as ''ink'' to make foods and novel materials by additive manufacturing

New review confirms disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Black, Hispanic populations
Black and Hispanic populations are disproportionately affected by COVID-19, according to a systematic review published this week.

Advancing gene editing with new CRISPR/Cas9 variant
Researchers report the ability to improve safety and efficacy using a CRISPR-Cas9 variant known as miCas9.

Development of new stem cell type may lead to advances in regenerative medicine
A team led by UT Southwestern has derived a new ''intermediate'' embryonic stem cell type from multiple species that can contribute to chimeras and create precursors to sperm and eggs in a culture dish.

Natural selection plays major role in an organism's capacity to evolve and adapt
It's widely assumed within the evolutionary biology field that weak selection provides an advantage to an organism's ability to evolve.

Restoring a rudimentary form of vision in the blind
Restoration of vision in blind people through a brain implant is on the verge of becoming reality.

Low-dose CT for lung cancer screening: benefit outweighs potential harm
Low-dose CT for lung cancer screening: benefit outweighs potential harm An earlier initial diagnosis can reduce lung cancer mortality in heavy (ex-)smokers.

Supercomputer simulations could unlock mystery of Moon's formation
Astronomers have taken a step towards understanding how the Moon might have formed out of a giant collision between the early Earth and another massive object 4.5 billion years ago.

Chemical derived from car tires turns streams toxic, kills coho salmon
For Pacific Northwest coho salmon, returning to spawn in the streams and creeks near urban areas can be a death sentence, thanks to a ubiquitous additive in vehicle tires, a new study reveals.

Researchers discover life in deep ocean sediments at or above water's boiling point
Research published today in the journal Science found single-celled organisms living in sediments 1180 meters beneath the ocean at temperatures of 120 degrees Celsius

Dark excitons hit the spotlight
Heralding the end of a decade-long quest, in a promising new class of extremely thin, two-dimensional semiconductors, scientists in Japan have for the first time directly visualized and measured elusive particles, called dark excitons, that cannot be seen by light.

Household-grown food leads to improved health for children
Children grow taller in rural households where their mothers are supported to grow their own food - according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).

US state government crisis standards of care guidelines
State crisis standards of care (CSC) guidelines in the U.S.

Red Sea turtle hatchlings are feeling the heat
The balance of the sexes in marine turtle hatchlings may be disrupted by high sand temperatures at nesting sites around the Red Sea.

How networks form: Charting the developing brain
Researchers use connectomic mapping in the developing cortex to uncover the developmental wiring rules for inhibitory neurons

Study finds metformin reduced COVID-19 death risks in women
University of Minnesota Medical School and UnitedHealth Group researchers found that metformin was associated with significantly reduced COVID-19 death risks in women in one of the world's largest observational studies of COVID-19 patients.

Leaving so soon? Unusual planetary nebula fades mere decades after it arrived
The tiny Stingray Nebula unexpectedly appeared in the 1980s is by far the youngest planetary nebula in our sky.

Human Brain Project-supported innovation published in Science
Human Brain Project research has helped lay the foundation for a brain implant that could one day give blind people their sight back.

Increased school choice linked to better mental health for students
Allowing families to choose schools that are more suited to their children may play a key role in improving student mental health, including reducing adolescent suicide rates, suggests new research published in the peer-reviewed journal School Effectiveness and School Improvement.

Hiring foreign nurses does not hurt US nursing jobs, study shows
An aging US population is rapidly increasing the demand for nursing care.

Electrical spin filtering the key to ultra-fast, energy-efficient spintronics
A new UNSW study is a step towards even-faster, more energy-efficient 'spintronic' technology - an exciting, beyond-CMOS technology.

Researchers discover how bean plants fend off famished foes
A team led by scientists at the University of Washington and the University of California, San Diego has discovered that cowpeas -- a type of bean plant -- harbor receptors on the surface of their cells that can detect a compound in caterpillar saliva and initiate anti-herbivore defenses.

Use of controversial restrains varies wildly across the Pacific
Despite being considered a form of torture, and policies to reduce or abolish it in place, the use of mechanical restraints in psychiatric settings continues, a University of Otago-led study shows.

Can we improve our health with doses of safe, live microbes on a daily basis?
A group of scientists recently published a review paper in The Journal of Nutrition, covering evidence to date on the link between live dietary microbes and human health.

β-AR agonist therapy puts the brakes on oral cancer progression
Oral cancer has a high mortality rate that is mainly attributed to metastasis.

Battery of tests: Scientists figure out how to track what happens inside batteries
The new method could be the key to designing more efficient batteries for specific uses, like electric cars and airplanes.

Hubble captures fading of the stingray nebula
Astronomers have caught a rare glimpse of a rapidly fading shroud of gas around an aging star.

Hidden network of enzymes accounts for loss of brain synapses in Alzheimer's
A new study on Alzheimer's disease by Scripps Research scientists has revealed a previously unknown biochemical cascade in the brain that leads to the destruction of synapses, the connections between nerve cells that are responsible for memory and cognition.

Research identifies nanoscale effect of water and mineral content on bone
Researchers conducted the first study of the effect of water and mineral content on collagen fibrils, the essence of bone material, which will aid the development of synthetic materials to mimic bone.

Study highlights strategies for boosting accuracy of personal genetic risk scores
As the consumer genetics industry rapidly expands, more and more people are turning to DNA-based services to learn their risk of developing a wide range of diseases.

Researchers find 'missing link'
Otago researchers have found the ''missing link between stress and infertility''.
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