Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

December 07, 2020
Number of childhood, adolescent vaccinations administered before, after COVID-19 outbreak in Colorado
Using data from the Colorado Immunization Information System, this study suggests vaccination uptake in children and adolescents has decreased in Colorado since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak in that state.

Health Affairs: Reprocessing single-use med devices boosts circular economy for hospitals
Regulated medical device reprocessing is an important tool in improving environmental and public health outcomes, according to a new analysis published in Health Affairs.

Shining a light on the weird world of dihydrogen phosphate anions
UNSW scientists show that dihydrogen phosphate anions actually bind to one another when their negative charges suggest they shouldn't.

CRISPR-edited CAR T cells enhance fight against blood cancers
Knocking out a protein known to stifle T cell activation on CAR T cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology enhanced the engineered T cells' ability to eliminate blood cancers.

Cervical cancer survival may improve by targeting senescent "zombie" cells
How well women with cervical cancer respond to treatment and survive correlates with the level of 10 proteins in their blood that also are associated with a ''zombie'' cell state called senescence, Medical College of Georgia scientists report.

Children's Hospital Colorado study published in Science Immunology
Children's Hospital Colorado (Children's Colorado) Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders (CCBD) announced today that a study about the manipulation of bone marrow stem cells into innate lymphoid and natural killer cells will be published in Science Immunology, a well-respected, high-impact medical journal.

A library of mice to look up the best liver cancer treatment
Researchers from Osaka University have developed a mouse model that reproduces the real-world variety of genetic drivers of liver cancer, and used this model to discover that tumors driven by the gene FGF19 are especially vulnerable to treatment with the drug lenvatinib.

Trench fever in urban people who are homeless
A disease common during the First World War, trench fever, has been found in some urban populations experiencing homelessness in Canada, and physicians should be aware of this potentially fatal disease, highlights a practice article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Smarter traffic signs ahead?
Researchers in Poland have created smart road signs that use built-in Doppler radar, video, and acoustic radar and weather stations to monitor road traffic and conditions to warn drivers in real-time of hazards and prevent collisions on highways.

Key building block for organic molecules discovered in meteorites
Scientists from Japan and the USA have confirmed the presence in meteorites of a key organic molecule which may have been used to build other organic molecules, including some used by life.

How do we separate the factual from the possible? New research shows how our brain responds to both
Our brains respond to language expressing facts differently than they do to words conveying possibility, a team of neuroscientists has found.

Drones and AI detect soybean maturity with high accuracy
Walking rows of soybeans in the mid-summer heat is an exhausting but essential chore in breeding new cultivars.

A study predicts smooth interaction between humans and robots
According to a new study by Tampere University in Finland, making eye contact with a robot may have the same effect on people as eye contact with another person.

New method uses artificial intelligence to study live cells
A new study combines label-free imaging with artificial intelligence to study unlabeled live cells.

Researchers say we're watching the world go blind
Three University of Michigan researchers say eye care accessibility around the globe isn't keeping up with an aging population, posing challenges for eye care professionals over the next 30 years.

New geological findings from eastern Fennoscandia add new dimensions to the history of European ice
In Finland, the majority of the glacial and warm interval records have been interpreted to represent only the last, Weichselian, glacial cycle that took place 11,700-119,000 years ago.

Fracking sites may increase heart failure hospitalizations across large regions
Heart failure patients who live in communities affected by fracking are at increased risk for hospitalization, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology today.

uOttawa-led study shows that poor sleep can lead to depression in adolescents
Chronic sleep disruption during adolescence can lead to depression in both males and females and alters stress reactivity in females, according to a new study led by University of Ottawa researchers.

Novel anti-craving mechanism discovered to treat cocaine relapse
Cocaine continues to be one of the most commonly abused illicit drugs in the United States.

Machine learning identifies new brain network signature of major depression
Using machine learning, researchers have identified novel, distinct patterns of coordinated activity between different parts of the brain in people with major depressive disorder--even when different protocols are used to detect these brain networks.

Synthetic biology and machine learning speed the creation of lab-grown livers
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have combined synthetic biology with a machine learning algorithm to create human liver organoids with blood and bile handling systems.

Warning labels reduce sugary drink consumption in university setting, researchers found
A study in a university cafeteria shows that warning labels placed on sugary drinks could reduce sugar consumption in larger settings.

Paper-based electrochemical sensor can detect COVID-19 in less than five minutes
A team from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Grainger College of Engineering has developed a rapid, ultrasensitive test using a paper-based electrochemical sensor that can detect the presence of the virus in less than five minutes.

Participation in competitive sport in adolescence brings midlife health benefits to women
Females who participate in competitive sport during adolescence have better fitness at midlife than do females with no competitive sport background in adolescence, reveals a study conducted at the University of Jyväskylä.

One for all
AI-based evaluation of medical imaging data usually requires a specially developed algorithm for each task.

329 people injured by firearms in US each day, but for every death, 2 survive
Researchers examine trends in fatal and nonfatal firearm injuries to inform prevention strategies, finding that twice as many people who are shot survive than die.

Drug for rare disorder shows promise for treating herpes viruses
New research shows that the antiviral activity of the drug -- called phenylbutyrate, or PBA -- was even better when used along with acyclovir, a common HSV-1 treatment.

Scientists discover how COVID-19 virus causes multiple organ failure in mice
UCLA researchers are the first to create a version of COVID-19 in mice that shows how the disease damages organs other than the lungs.

Circulating tumor DNA indicates risk of relapse after transplant in DLBCL patients
Many patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) can be cured by a transplant using their own blood-forming stem cells, but as many as half eventually relapse.

Brain clears the way for binocular vision even before eyes are open
The brain architecture of binocular vision is laid down even before a young mouse's eyes are open.

Aluminium alloy research could benefit manned space missions
Manned space missions in spacecraft made of aluminium that is light yet resistant to radiation could be a step nearer following research involving a world-leading facility at the University of Huddersfield.

'Big data' enables first census of desert shrub
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin leveraged computer algorithms and high-resolution survey data to conduct the first-ever creosote census - counting every creosote in a 135-square-mile conservation site in Nevada's Mojave Desert.

Newly discovered Greenland plume drives thermal activities in the Arctic
A team of researchers understands more about the melting of the Greenland ice sheet.

The ever-elusive riddle: What's the best way to cut Christmas cookies?
At some point in life, most people have stood over a rolled-out slab of cookie dough and pondered just how to best cut out cookies with as little waste as possible.

Don't let them go quietly into the night
Researchers from Kyoto University's describe a systematic survey of the state of Japanese bat research and their analysis of the possible roots of the problem.

Observing the ultrafast motion of atoms and electrons
Photo-induced electron transfer is central to numerous physical processes, for instance in the magnetization of materials.

What makes COVID misinformation so tough to stop on social media
A recent study highlights two of the reasons that misinformation about COVID-19 is so difficult to tackle on social media: most people think they're above average at spotting misinformation; and misinformation often triggers negative emotions that resonate with people.

Researchers use genomics to identify diabetic retinopathy factors
In the paper, ''Integration of genomics and transcriptomics predicts diabetic retinopathy susceptibility genes,'' published in eLife, researchers identified genes that respond differently in response to high glucose in individuals with and without diabetic retinopathy.

Two new studies investigate the early, potent response of IgA antibodies against SARS-CoV-2
A new study of more than 150 COVID-19 patients shows that IgA antibodies dominate the early response to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, coming on more quickly and strongly than IgG and IgM antibodies.

Wastewater testing for COVID-19
A new wastewater testing approach capable of better detecting viral infection patterns in communities could prove a crucial step toward an informed public health response to diseases like COVID-19.

When playing favorites can hurt growth
Industrial parks in China perform less well when developed on the apparent basis of preexisting ties among political leaders, according to a study co-authored by MIT professor Siqi Zheng.

Genetic variants linked to heart health in African American childhood cancer survivors
Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have identified genetic variants in African American childhood cancer survivors that have implications for up-front care and long-term surveillance.

Appearances can be deceiving: Display versus surface colors
The white of paper and the white of monitor can be precisely the same color values, yet they appear fundamentally different.

Split wave
Neural networks are some of the most important tools in AI.

Rap music increasingly mixes in mental health metaphors
The proportion of rap songs that referenced depression, suicide and mental health struggles more than doubled between 1998 and 2018, according to a study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in JAMA Pediatrics.

Quick and sensitive identification of multidrug-resistant germs
Researchers from the University of Basel have developed a sensitive testing system that allows the rapid and reliable detection of resistance in bacteria.

Bend, don't break: new tool enables economic glass design
Computer scientists develop a design tool that opens up the use of a cost-efficient technology for curved glass panels.

Simple, sensitive test helps monitor bats and protect biodiversity
A new article in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry explores the use of a simple, inexpensive, and minimally invasive technique referred to as 'micronuclei detection' to assess genetic toxicity (genotoxicity) in free-ranging bats in areas of varying agricultural activity.

Stay-at-home orders tied to an increase in harmful alcohol consumption, study finds
Binge drinkers increased their alcohol consumption by nearly 20% during COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, according to new research by public health experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Red propolis could be used to treat schistosomiasis
In vitro studies and experiments with mice show that the natural extract was more effective than the only drug available to combat this parasitic disease

Problems with depth perception caused by too many cells
The connections that integrate information from the left and right eyes are set up early in development, but visual experiences are important for fine-tuning the circuits.

Peatland preservation vital to climate
Preserving the world's peatlands --- and the vast carbon stores they contain -- is vital to limiting climate change, researchers say.

Research provides tools for achieving the 'how' of well-being in daily life
In a recently published paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison introduce a new framework for emotional well-being that focuses on specific skills that can be learned.

Researchers create framework to help determine timing of cancer mutations
UCLA researchers studying cancer evolution have created a framework to help determine which tool combinations are best for pinpointing the exact timing of DNA mutations in cancer genomes.

Novel form of Alzheimer's protein found in spinal fluid indicates stage of the disease
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a novel form of the Alzheimer's protein tau in the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord.

New COVID-19 testing approach measures patients' immune response for better diagnosis
Researchers from UC San Francisco and the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub (CZ Biohub) have developed a new approach for COVID-19 testing that detects a distinct pattern of immune gene expression in infected individuals.

Feeling out fine differences in touch sensitivity
We have known about a skin touch sensor for more than 160 years.

Genetics of human face begin to reveal underlying profile
The genetics behind the shape of the human face are difficult to decipher, but now an international team of researchers has connected specific genetic signals with specific areas of the face.

Hibiscus reduces the toxicity of ammonia for rainbow trout, say RUDN University biologists
A team of biologists from RUDN University developed a hibiscus-based dietary supplement for trout that makes the fish less sensitive to ammonia pollution and more stress-resistant.

Molecular mechanism of plant immune receptors discovered
Research team from the University of Cologne and the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ) explore the activation of plant immune receptors by pathogens / similar function of immune receptors in plants and animals.

Synthetic llama antibodies rescue doomed proteins inside cells
Columbia researchers created a new technology using synthetic llama antibodies to protect endangered proteins inside cells.

White blood cells may cause tumor cell death -- but that's not good news
White blood cells are part of many immune system responses in the human body.

Can gender inequality kill? Paper looks at impact among older Indian women
Indian women past childbearing age are dying at a higher rate than those in other countries because of poverty and limited access to resources such as food and health care, according to a study from Rice University,

Study finds no change in preterm birth or stillbirth in Philadelphia during pandemic
Despite early reports suggesting a decline in preterm births during the COVID-19 pandemic period, an analysis by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found no change in preterm births or stillbirths at two Philadelphia hospitals in the first four months of the pandemic.

Gut research identifies key cellular changes associated with childhood-onset Crohn's Disease
Scientists have tracked the very early stages of human foetal gut development in incredible detail, and found specific cell functions that appear to be reactivated in the gut of children with Crohn's Disease.

Maternal anxiety affects the fetal brain
Anxiety in gestating mothers appears to affect the course of brain development in their fetuses, changing neural connectivity in the womb, a new study by Children's National Hospital researchers suggests.

Research brief: Researchers develop unique process for producing light-matter mixture
In groundbreaking new research, an international team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota Twin Cities has developed a unique process for producing a quantum state that is part light and part matter.

Hydrogel could open new path for glaucoma treatment without drugs or surgery
Researchers have developed a potential new treatment for the eye disease glaucoma that could replace daily eye drops and surgery with a twice-a-year injection to control the buildup of pressure in the eye.

Study finds large-scale expansion of stem rust resistance gene in barley and oat lineages
Stem rust is one of the most devastating fungal diseases of wheat and historically has caused dramatic, widespread crop failures resulting in significant yield losses around the world.

New semiconductor detector shows promise for medical diagnostics and homeland security
This method allows users to identify legal versus illegal gamma rays.

Chemotherapy and blinatumomab improves survival for patients with B-cell acute lympho
A study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center showed that first-line treatment with a regimen of chemotherapy combined with the monoclonal antibody blinatumomab resulted in increased survival and achieved a high rate of measurable residual disease (MRD) negativity for patients who were newly diagnosed with a high-risk form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) known as Philadelphia chromosome-negative B-cell ALL (Ph-negative B-ALL).

Rise of the underdog: a neglected mechanism in antiferromagnets may be key to spintronics
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) discover a mechanism in antiferromagnets that could be useful for spintronic devices.

New sunspot cycle could be one of the strongest on record, new research predicts
In direct contradiction to the official forecast, a team of scientists led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is predicting that the Sunspot Cycle that started this fall could be one of the strongest since record-keeping began.

Study identifies links between atopic dermatitis and autoimmune diseases
In a recent study published in the British Journal of Dermatology, individuals with atopic dermatitis, or eczema, were more likely to also have various autoimmune diseases, especially those involving the skin, the gastrointestinal tract, or the connective tissue.

Study finds obesity contributes to 40% mortality gap between Black and white women with early breast
In an analysis of women with early breast cancer, Black women had higher rates of obesity and other health conditions that can affect survival, compared with white women.

Harnessing quantum properties to create single-molecule devices
Researchers, led by Columbia Engineering Prof Latha Venkataraman, report today that they have discovered a new chemical design principle for exploiting destructive quantum interference.

This flexible and rechargeable battery is 10 times more powerful than state of the art
A team of researchers has developed a flexible, rechargeable silver oxide-zinc battery with a five to 10 times greater areal energy density than state of the art.

Imitation mosquito ears help identify mosquito species and sex
Using an imitation ''ear'' modeled on the organs that mosquitos use to hear, researchers have identified a mosquito's species and sex using sound -- just like mosquitos do themselves.

Hard and fast emission cuts slow warming in the next 20 years
A new study shows that strong and rapid action to cut emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases will help to slow down the rate of global warming over the next twenty years.

SARS-CoV-2 in wastewater solids could help monitor COVID-19 spread
Scientists have analyzed compounds in wastewater to gauge various aspects of public health, including narcotics usage, antibiotic resistance, and, more recently, the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

Seventeen genetic abnormalities that cause brain aneurysms
Intracranial aneurysm is a dilation of a blood vessel forming a fragile pocket.

Java's protective mangroves smothered by plastic waste
The mangrove forests on Java's north coast are slowly suffocating in plastic waste.

Evaluation of rooming-in practice for babies born to mothers with SARS-CoV-2 infection in Italy
The findings of this study suggest that mother-to-infant transmission of SARS-CoV-2 during rooming-in practice is rare, provided adequate droplet and contact precautions are taken.

Arctic ground squirrels recycle nutrients to endure deep hibernation
By studying the body chemistry of hibernating Arctic ground squirrels, researchers have found that the animals are able to recycle their body's own nutrients to survive during a long, inactive winter.

How the brain distinguishes fact from possibility
Processing certain factual information elicits stronger brain activity than uncertain information, according to research recently published in eNeuro.

No refuge from the heat
Over the past several decades, marine protected areas (MPAs) have emerged as a favored conservation tool.

Stunning discovery reveals bonefish dive 450 feet 'deep' into the abyss to spawn
Using active acoustic telemetry and sonar data, a study provides the first detailed documentation of a shallow water fish diving 450 feet deep to spawn.

A comprehensive review of biosynthesis of inorganic nanomaterials using microorganisms and bacteriophages
A KAIST bioprocess engineering research team conducted a summary of 146 biosynthesized single and multi-element inorganic nanomaterials covering 55 elements in the periodic table synthesized using wild-type and genetically engineered microorganisms.

Pupils can learn more effectively through stories than activities
Storytelling -- the oldest form of teaching -- is the most effective way of teaching primary school children about evolution, say researchers at the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath.

Career thoughts and parental relationships in adolescents with ADHD
A new study published in The Career Development Quarterly looked for potential links between negative or dysfunctional career thoughts and the quality of parental relationships in high school students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

New study shows every week of lockdown increases binge drinking
Study participants who regularly drank at harmful levels shown to consume six drinks per session, compared to two alcoholic beverages for those less regular binge drinkers.

Increase in head start funding 'a national priority'
Increased funding for Head Start -- the largest federally funded, early childhood development program in the United States -- is needed to support families during the COVID-19 recession and to ensure a more stable economic recovery.

The world's first DNA 'tricorder' in your pocket
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists have built the first mobile genome sequence analyzer, making DNA analysis portable and accessible anywhere in the world.

Mount Sinai researchers advance a universal influenza virus vaccine
A vaccine that induces immune responses to a wide spectrum of influenza virus strains and subtypes has produced strong and durable results in early-stage clinical trials in humans, Mount Sinai researchers have found.

Military flights biggest cause of noise pollution on Olympic Peninsula
A University of Washington study provides the first look at how much noise pollution is impacting the Olympic Peninsula.

I see you: Honey bees use contagious and honest visual signal to deter attacking hornets
What do honey bees and deadly hornets have to do with issues surrounding ''fake news?'' UC San Diego-led research is providing new details about honey bees and their defenses against preying hornets.

Grasping an object - model describes complete movement planning in the brain
Neurobiologists at the German Primate Center developed a model that for the first time can completely represent the neuronal processes from seeing to grasping an object.

New fundamental knowledge of the 'abdominal brain'
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have succeeded in mapping the neuron types comprising the enteric nervous system in the intestine of mice.

Seizing military weapons does not increase violent crime nor risk police safety
More local law enforcement agencies are using military equipment, such as tear gas, armored vehicles and rubber bullets, to handle social justice protests--calling into question police militarization.

The natural 'Himalayan aerosol factory' can affect climate
Large amounts of new particles can form in the valleys of the Himalayas from naturally emitted gases and can be transported to high altitudes by the mountain winds and injected into the upper atmosphere.

Caregiver burden in dementia during the COVID19 crisis
Caregivers of people with dementia and milder forms of neurocognitive disorder bear a heavy burden.

Study details how aerobic exercise reverses degenerative process that leads to metabolic diseases
Experiments with mice and humans showed that exercise training increased the expression in adipose tissue of a key enzyme for the organism's metabolic health, combating the harmful effects of aging and obesity

Mental health themes in popular rap music
Lyrics from the most popular rap songs from the past two decades were analyzed to see if references to anxiety, depression, suicide and mental health struggles have become more common.

RUDN University biologist: Fern leaves improve immunity and support growth in carps
According to a biologist from RUDN University, fern leaves powder has a positive effect on the immune system, antimicrobial activity, and growth of carps.

Potential cancer therapy may boost immune response
A new approach to cancer therapy shows potential to transform the commonly used chemotherapy drug gemcitabine into a drug that kills cancer cells in a specialized way, activating immune cells to fight the cancer, according to a study led by Cedars-Sinai Cancer investigators.

Are people healthy enough to retire later?
While many people are now enjoying longer, healthier lives, current retirement ages are posing challenges for both policymakers and retirees.

BIO Integration journal, Volume 1, Issue Number 3, publishes
BIO Integration Journal, Volume 1, Issue Number 3, Publishes. Integration of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Medicine and Biomedicine.

Central Europe: dry Aprils pave the way for summer droughts
In the past 20 years, Central Europe has experienced six summer heat waves and droughts.

Useful 'fake' peptides
Some useful drugs consist of peptides acting on their protein targets.

New research questions myth of the elderly widower: of course grandpa cook
The assumption that an elderly widower can hardly boil an egg simply doesn't stand according to a recent University of Copenhagen study.

Urban heat and mortality: who are the most vulnerable?
Social inequalities affect the risk of mortality and morbidity in the event of extreme temperatures.

How to use antibodies to control chemical reactions
In a collaborative effort a group of international scientists has recently demonstrated a way to control different synthetic chemical reactions with specific antibodies.

UTSA researchers study the effects of parental job loss on families during the pandemic
A team of UTSA researchers has discovered that economic implications because of COVID-19 can have a devastating ripple effect on children.

The Lancet Public Health: Travel restrictions must be used in a targeted way to be effective at controlling local COVID-19 transmission, modelling study suggests
International travel restrictions may only be effective at controlling the spread of COVID-19 when applied in a targeted way, according to research published in The Lancet Public Health journal.

Astrocytes improve decision-making
A study led by researchers from the Cajal Institute of the Spanish Research Council (CSIC) has demonstrated the relevance of the astrocytes (a cell type present in the Nervous System) in the decision-making process.

Possible bittersweet effects of stevia uncovered by Ben-Gurion U. researchers
According to the new study, stevia may disrupt communications between different bacteria in the gut microbiome.

Risk of vine-to-vine spread of Xylella fastidiosa is greatest in July and August
'Managing the spread of X. fastidiosa is challenging due to a lack of field data on seasonal changes in vector abundance, proportion of vector population carrying the pathogen, and probability of acquisition from infected plants,' explained Mark Sisterson, a vector entomologist with the Agricultural Research Service-USDA.

Remote Hawaiian island harbors last land snails of their kind
The island of Nihoa, a slice of jagged rock that juts out of the Pacific Ocean, is the sole refuge for a rediscovered species of native Hawaiian land snail previously presumed to be extinct.

Dynamic plants
Led by University of Pennsylvania prof Brian Gregory and postdoc Xiang Yu, researchers have uncovered one way plants respond to hormonal cues.

A recipe for protein footprinting
By publishing their method in the journal Nature Protocols, chemists have opened doors for fellow scientists to better address research questions related to Alzheimer's disease, the COVID-19 pandemic and more.

Development of a new method for decoding viral genes
A research team led by Professor Yasushi Kawaguchi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, developed a new decoding method for viral genes that can easily and quickly obtain even non-canonical genetic information.

Image-based navigation could help spacecraft safely land on the moon
In research recently published in the AIAA Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, a multidisciplinary team of engineers demonstrated how a series of lunar images can be used to infer the direction that a spacecraft is moving.

COVID-19 transmission in nursing homes may be affected by nurses and direct care workers with multip
Nurses and other long-term care workers in nursing homes who hold multiple jobs, may be one of the factors contributing to the spread of COVID-19 in these facilities, according to a new study published in Medical Care Research and Review. The findings examine the likelihood that nurses and direct care workers in long-term care facilities hold a second job, and how demographic differences between the two may affect this probability.

Research brief: Global trends in nature's contributions to people
A U of M-led study examined the risks to human well-being and prosperity stemming from ongoing environmental degradation.

Outside Oz, GLINDA reports on tornado acoustics
During tornado formation, sound waves are produced at very low frequencies.

New transistor design disguises key computer chip hardware from hackers
Purdue University engineers propose a built-in security measure that would better protect computer chip hardware from hackers

Undocumented immigrants far less likely to commit crimes in U.S. than citizens
Crime rates among undocumented immigrants are just a fraction of those of their U.S.-born neighbors, according to a first-of-its-kind analysis of Texas arrest and conviction records.

Hotspots of cheetah activity is a key to solving the cheetah-farmer conflict in Namibia
New insights into the cheetah's spatial behaviour provide a viable solution to the human-wildlife conflict: In the core areas of male cheetah territories, all local males and females frequently meet to exchange information.

Two related discoveries advance basic and applied additive manufacturing research
A research team led by Tao Sun, associate professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Virginia, has made two discoveries that can expand additive manufacturing in aerospace and other industries that rely on strong metal parts.

Breakthrough material makes pathway to hydrogen use for fuel cells under hot, dry conditions
A collaborative research team, including Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of Stuttgart (Germany), University of New Mexico, and Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a proton conductor for fuel cells based on polystyrene phosphonic acids that maintain high protonic conductivity up to 200 C without water.

Scientists get the lowdown on sun's super-hot atmosphere
Images of the sun captured by the IRIS mission show new details of how low-lying loops of plasma are energized, and may also reveal how the hot corona is created.

Newly discovered fossils prove 'Shangri-La'-like ecosystem in central Tibet
During the Second Tibetan Plateau Scientific Expedition in Tibet, an international research team from the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) and the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology discovered a highly diverse fossil assemblage from the current elevation of ?4,850 m in the Bangor Basin in central Tibet.

Deep rooted -- mother's empathy linked to 'epigenetic' changes to the oxytocin gene
Parenting behavior is deeply linked to the ability to empathize with one's children.

Smellicopter: an obstacle-avoiding drone that uses a live moth antenna to seek out smells
A University of Washington-led team has developed Smellicopter: an autonomous drone that uses a live antenna from a moth to navigate toward smells.

Researchers call for renewed focus on thermoelectric cooling
Almost 200 years after French physicist Jean Peltier discovered that electric current flowing through the junction of two different metals could be used to produce a heating or cooling effect, researchers say it is time to step up efforts to find new materials for the thermoelectric cooling market.

How clean electricity can upgrade the value of captured carbon
A team of researchers from University of Toronto Engineering has created a new process for converting carbon dioxide captured from smokestacks into commercially valuable products, such as fuels and plastics.

Nursing researcher's experience in COVID-19 vaccine trial
This perspective is that of a nursing researcher turned volunteer in a COVID-19 vaccine trial.

Research concluding noncompetes stifle workers forthcoming in multiple publications
The University of Maryland's Evan Starr has extensively studied noncompetes, with the same conclusion: the agreements hurt workers.

COVID-19 pandemic health disparities and pediatric health care
Telehealth is a vital strategy to bridge pediatric physical and mental health care gaps, potentially reducing health care disparities.

Wind tunnel tests will help design future Army tiltrotor aircraft
NORFOLK, Va. -- After more than three years in development, a team of U.S.

New study findings: militarizing local police does not reduce crime
New research shows that the militarization of local law enforcement through weapons, armored vehicles, combat attire, office equipment and other items provided by the Department of Defense does not reduce crime.

New longitudinal study documents antibody responses to COVID-19 5 months after symptom onset
A new 5-month longitudinal analysis of 254 COVID-19 patients who displayed a wide range of disease severity - from asymptomatic to deadly illness - suggests that IgA and IgM antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 virus disappear quickly during convalescence.

Study shows that active surveillance holds promise as a treatment option for low-risk thyroid cancer
Results from a new study co-led by researchers at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and the Department of Surgery at Kuma Hospital in Kobe, Japan, show that active surveillance can be successfully implemented as a viable treatment option for patients with low-risk thyroid cancer.

Measurements of tree height can help cycad conservation decisions
A multi-national research team has exploited long-term data sets that span 2001 to 2018 to reveal the utility of tree height quantifications in informing conservation decisions of an arborescent cycad species.

How the brain remembers right place, right time
DALLAS - Dec. 8, 2020 - Two studies led by UT Southwestern researchers shed new light on how the brain encodes time and place into memories.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.