Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

December 14, 2020
Does sharing health data help maintain weight loss?
Research from the Center for Weight, Eating and Lifestyle Science (WELL Center) in the College of Arts and Sciences at Drexel University suggests that health counselors having access to self-monitored health data would improve a person's weight loss maintenance.

Mindfulness meditation may decrease impact of migraine
In a recent clinical trial from Wake Forest Baptist Health, researchers showed that mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) may provide benefit to people with migraine.

Wearable sensor may signal you're developing COVID-19 - even if your symptoms are subtle
A smart ring that generates continuous temperature data may foreshadow COVID-19, even in cases when infection is not suspected.

How can we make sure people get the second COVID-19 vaccine dose?
The availability of COVID-19 will not necessarily result in people getting fully vaccinated, because the first vaccines to reach public use require two doses for full protection - and research has shown that many people never follow up on multi-dose vaccines or other multi-step preventive health practices.

Using play to "school" children's emotions
Pretend play is a pedagogical tool that can be used to stimulate a child's socio-emotional competences.

How computer simulation will accelerate development of human-interactive "smart robots"
Lehigh University's Jeff Trinkle, along with colleagues at other institutions, has co-authored a ''Perspective'' paper called ''On the use of simulation in robotics: Opportunities, challenges, and suggestions for moving forward'' that appears in the latest issue of PNAS arguing that ''...well-validated computer simulation can provide a virtual proving ground that in many cases is instrumental in understanding safely, faster, at lower costs, and more thoroughly how the robots of the future should be designed and controlled for safe operation and improved performance.''

Industrial waste is reused to produce alternatives to plastic
Researchers at São Paulo State University reused bacterial cellulose scraps usually thrown away by manufacturers of wound dressings to make strong biodegradable film for food packaging

Proportionally more male bosses negative toward depression
A higher proportion of male than of female managers have negative attitudes toward depression, a University of Gothenburg study shows.

High blood pressure at any age, no matter how long you have it, may speed cognitive decline
Memory, concentration and other cognitive functions decline faster among middle-aged and older adults who have high blood pressure than those who do not.

Ocean heatwave has triggered new toxic algal blooms on the US west coast
Ocean warming has created a toxic hotspot of harmful algae on the west coast of the US, shows a new study led by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Northwest Fisheries Science Center.

Benefits of renewable energy vary from place to place
A new study finds the environmental benefits of renewable power generation vary significantly, depending on the nature of the conventional power generation that the renewable energy is offsetting.

What makes peppers blush
Bright red, tasty and healthy, that's how we know and love bell peppers.

Singing to preterm infants during kangaroo care reduces maternal anxiety
Premature births are stressful experiences that increase the risk of anxiety for mothers and may hinder the development of interaction between mother and infant.

The moon controls the release of methane in Arctic Ocean
The moon controls one of the most formidable forces in nature - the tides that shape our coastlines.

Toward imperceptible electronics that you cannot see or feel
Researchers from Osaka University fabricated transparent, ultrathin, flexible sensors with cross-aligned silver nanowire microelectronics fabricated using print technique that would be inexpensive and straightforward to mass-produce.

New combination therapy could help fight difficult-to-treat cancers with common mutations
UCLA scientists describe a new combination therapy that suppresses the MAPK pathway by holding cancer-driving proteins in a death grip.

Invasive harlequin ladybird causes severe decline of two-spotted ladybird, new study shows
CABI scientists have led an 11-year study which shows how the invasive harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) caused the severe decline of the two-spotted ladybird on broadleaved trees and shrubs in northern Switzerland.

More frequent and extreme marine heatwaves likely to threaten starfish
Common starfish cannot survive amplified marine heatwaves projected at the end of the century and experience lasting negative effects from current heatwaves, according to new research being presented on at the British Ecological Society's Festival of Ecology.

USC study: Young adults who identify as Republicans eschew COVID safety precautions
Young Californians who identify themselves as Republicans are less likely to follow social distancing guidelines that prevent coronavirus transmission than those who identify as Democrats or Independents, according to new USC study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.

High-rate Li-ion batteries demonstrate superior safety
In the paper, 'Determining the Limits and Effects of High-Rate Cycling on Lithium Iron Phosphate Cylindrical Cells' published in and on the cover of the Journal Batteries, researchers from WMG, University of Warwick investigated the impacts on battery cell ageing from high current operation using commercial cells.

What happens when rain falls on desert soils? An updated model provides answers
In a new study in Vadose Zone Journal, Desert Research Institute scientists Yuan Luo, Ph.D., Markus Berli, Ph.D., and colleagues Teamrat Ghezzehei, Ph.D. of the University of California, Merced, and Zhongbo Yu, Ph.D. of the University of Hohai, China, make important improvements to our understanding of how water moves through and gets stored in dry desert soils by refining an existing computer model.

A smart ring shows it's possible to detect fever before you feel it
Advance could pave the way for early warning system on COVID-19 and flu using wearables.

COVID-19: indoor air in hospitals and nursing homes require more attention
A variety of measures are necessary to prevent the spread of the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 in hospitals and nursing homes.

Apathy could predict onset of dementia years before other symptoms
Apathy -- a lack of interest or motivation -- could predict the onset of some forms of dementia many years before symptoms start, offering a 'window of opportunity' to treat the disease at an early stage, according to new research from a team of scientists led by Professor James Rowe at the University of Cambridge.

Silica the best environmental alternative to plastic microbeads, finds study
Following bans on plastic microbeads in wash-off cosmetics, a new study weighs up the environmental costs of alternatives.

How childhood brain function and memory skills shape each other
In early childhood, memory skills predict the strength of future brain connections, and conversely, the strength of early brain connections predict future memory acuity.

The un-appeal of banana: liquid e-cigarette flavorings measurably injure lungs
UC San Diego researchers report chemicals used for flavor in e-cigarette liquid negatively affect specialized proteins that support immune system.

Molecule holds promise to reprogram white blood cells for better cancer treatment
Cancer immunotherapy using ''designer'' immune cells has revolutionized cancer treatment.

Experts advocate responsible and transparent use of algorithms in government
Amsterdam, NL, December 14, 2020 - The use of algorithms in government is transforming the way bureaucrats work and make decisions in different areas, such as healthcare or criminal justice.

Diversity, representation of physicians during COVID-19 news cycle
The diversity of speakers who discussed COVID-19 and other content on three popular American cable news networks (Fox News Network, CNN and MSNBC) was investigated in this study.

Ancient DNA continues to rewrite corn's 9,000-year society-shaping history
In the Dec. 14 issue of the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, international team of scientists report the fully sequenced genomes of three roughly 2,000-year-old cobs from the El Gigante rock shelter in Honduras.

LED lights found to kill coronavirus: Global first in fight against COVID-19
Researchers from Tel Aviv University have proven that the coronavirus can be killed efficiently, quickly, and cheaply using ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs).

Exploring the relationship between nitrogen and carbon dioxide in greenhouse gas emissions
A University of Oklahoma-led interdisciplinary study on a decade-long experiment (1997-2009) at the University of Minnesota found that lower nitrogen levels in soil promoted release of carbon dioxide from soils under high levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and could therefore contribute to furthering rising atmospheric greenhouse gases and climate change.

Unexpected discovery leads to better understanding of migraine
Massive ''plumes'' of glutamate, a key neurotransmitter, surging in the brain could help explain the onset of migraine with aura--and potentially a broad swath of neurologic disease, including stroke and traumatic brain injury--according to an international study led by University of Utah Health scientists.

One's trash, another's treasure: fertilizer made from urine could enable space agriculture
From the perspective of future societies, in extremely closed environments such as a space station, self-sufficiency in food cultivation and waste management is critical.

Study finds paediatric cancer patients at no greater risk of severe COVID-19 infection
Children with cancer who test positive for COVID-19 do not appear to be at an increased risk of severe COVID-19 infection compared to healthy children, according a new UK study.

The video referee in the spotlight
Since the 2019/20 season, controversial referee calls in the English Premier League may be technically reviewed and, if deemed necessary, corrected.

Applying compost to landfills could have environmental benefits
Many people think of composting organic matter as a way of keeping solid waste out of landfills, but a new study finds there can be significant environmental benefits associated with using compost at landfills.

Salt-tolerant bacteria with an appetite for sludge make biodegradable plastics
The United States generates seven million tons of sewage sludge annually, enough to fill 2,500 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

Chemists from RUDN University used crab shells to improve palladium catalysts
?hemists from RUDN University synthesized soluble biopolymers based on chitin from crab shells.

Temporal control of light echoes
Scientists at Paderborn University, the Technical University of Dortmund and the University of Würzburg have for the very first time succeeded in using laser pulses to precisely control 'photon echoes', which can occur when light waves superimpose on each other.

Drugs create balancing act for patients with non-small cell lung cancer
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy researchers identified a correlation between multisystem immune-related adverse events and improved rates of survival.

Clinical characteristics, disease severity among infants with SARS-CoV-2 infection
This study describes the manifestations and severity of disease among infants with SARS-CoV-2 infection.

New research points to effective ways to increase support for addressing ec
Researchers have found that information about economic inequality focusing on the disadvantages facing people from the lower-socioeconomic class leads Americans to engage more with the issue and to express greater support for action to mitigate inequality.

Scientists recruit new atomic heavyweights in targeted fight against cancer
Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Berkeley Lab and Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed new methods for the large-scale production, purification, and use of the radioisotope cerium-134, which could serve as a PET imaging radiotracer for a highly targeted cancer treatment known as alpha-particle therapy.

Artificial intelligence sets sights on the sun
Scientists employed a neural network to learn the characteristics of high-quality images of the ground-based full-disk images of the sun and estimate the deviation of real observations from an ideal reference.

Massive underground instrument finds final secret of our sun's fusion
The Borexino detector, a hyper-sensitive instrument deep underground in Italy, has finally succeeded at the nearly impossible task of detecting CNO neutrinos from our sun's core.

Grasping exponential growth
Most people underestimate exponential growth, including when it comes to the spread of the coronavirus.

Researchers discover clue to how to protect neurons and encourage their growth
Researchers have identified a family of enzymes whose inhibition both protects neurons and encourages their growth, a pathway to potential new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases from Alzheimer's to glaucoma.

High-brightness source of coherent light spanning from the UV to THz
An international team of scientists reports in Nature Photonics on a novel technique for a high-brightness coherent and few-cycle duration source spanning 7 optical octaves from the UV to the THz.

Sheets of carbon nanotubes come in a rainbow of colours
Nanomaterials researchers in Finland, the United States and China have created a colour atlas for 466 unique varieties of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

Powerhouse plants that bolster the food web
Researchers have identified the most critical plants needed to sustain food webs across the United States.

One-year kidney allograft outcomes do not differ by hepatitis C status of donor
Study published in AJKD shows that kidney allograft outcomes one year post-transplantation in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-negative recipients do not differ by the HCV status of the donor.

Vaccines must prevent infection, disease progression and transmission - in every country - to truly bring COVID-19 under control
An editorial co-authored by a member of the UK's influential SAGE committee that advises the UK Government on COVID-19, and published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) says that in order for the global COVID-19 vaccination program to be successful, the available vaccines must be able to do all three of: prevent infection becoming established in an individual, prevent disease progression and prevent onward transmission.

Quantum interference in time
Bosons--especially photons--have a natural tendency to clump together. In 1987, three physicists conducted a remarkable experiment demonstrating this clustering property, known as the Hong-Ou- Mandel effect.

Everything you want to know about sunscreen
From safety and effectiveness to who should use sunscreen and how to apply it, Canadian dermatologists review the latest evidence and guidelines on use of sunscreen.

New hard-carbon anode material for sodium-ion batteries will solve the lithium conundrum
Today, most rechargeable batteries are lithium-ion batteries, which are made from relatively scarce elements--this calls for the development of batteries using alternative materials.

When absolute certainty may not be possible: Criteria to determine death by mountain rescue teams
The International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine (ICAR MedCom) convened an expert medical panel to develop evidence-based criteria that allow for accurate determination of death in mountain rescue situations.

Seabed sediment and asphalt areas are noteworthy sources of heat energy
According to a new study from the University of Vaasa, seabed sediment and asphalt areas are noteworthy sources of heat energy also in northern conditions.

Cooperation across boundaries and sectors could boost sustainable development
A new analysis of food, energy, water, and climate change in the Indus Basin shows how a cross-boundary and multi-sectoral perspective could lead to economic benefits and lower costs for all countries involved.

When you can't afford to go on lockdown
Researchers at HSE University and Lomonosov Moscow State University analyzed data on Russians' movements during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Model could help determine quarantine measures needed to reduce Covid-19's spread
A model developed by MIT researchers shows a direct link between the number of people who become infected and how effectively a state maintains its quarantine measures.

'Windows of opportunity' crucial for cutting Chesapeake nutrient, sediment loads
The vast majority of nutrients and sediment washed into streams flowing into the Chesapeake Bay are picked up by deluges from severe storms that occur on relatively few days of the year.

Marine pollution: How do plastic additives dilute in water and how risky are they?
New research by scientists from Korea shows that additives in plastic materials deployed or thrown in coastal environments diffuse into the environment at different rates.

Young people who go to bed later drink and smoke more due to their impulsivity
Young people who prefer to stay up late are more impulsive than their peers who go to bed earlier, which makes them more likely to drink alcohol and smoke, a new study in the journal Chronobiology International, reports.

Irrelevant information interferes with making decisions, new research reveals
According to new research from behavioral economist Ian Chadd, an assistant professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, irrelevant information or unavailable options often cause people to make bad choices.

Study shows endothelial cell targeting could help fight Covid-19 symptoms
For Covid-19 patients with serious lung disease, targeting endothelial cells -cells that comprise the blood vessel wall which regulate oxygen exchange between airways and the bloodstream- may be a novel approach restoring normal lung function.

Data-driven discovery of biomarkers pave way for improved diagnosis of contact allergy
With the help of algorithms, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified markers that can differentiate between irritant eczema and contact allergy, two skin reactions that look similar but require different treatment.

Global warming is faster than evolution
If global warming happens too quickly, not all species will be able to adapt in time.

Shedding light on the dark side of biomass burning pollution
Especially toxic, oxidized aerosol from biomass burning contains a large amount of carcinogens and mutagens.

Allocating resources across life span during COVID-19
This Viewpoint discusses the need to account for neonates and children, who are typically disproportionally impacted during pandemics, by implementing hospital resource allocation protocols that ensure equity across the life span.

Chance played a major role in keeping Earth fit for life
A study by the University of Southampton gives a new perspective on why our planet has managed to stay habitable for billions of years - concluding it is almost certainly due, at least in part, to luck.

International research project investigates photosensitive carbon nanoparticles
An international team of researchers, including researchers from FAU headed by Prof.

Success in the Amazon
In 2006, Greenpeace launched a campaign exposing deforestation caused by soy production in the Brazilian Amazon.

An unexpected role for the brain's immune cells
A team at Gladstone Institutes led by Katerina Akassoglou has uncovered that microglial cells constantly survey the brain to prevent spontaneous seizures.

Characterising Indonesia's bird-owners guides behaviour change amid Asian Songbird Crisis
A comprehensive new study into the key user groups in Indonesia's bird trade offers hope for protecting species through behavioural change.

Moffitt program bringing patients, scientists together infuses new meaning into research
Because they spend most of their time in their labs, basic science researchers rarely get to meet the patients who benefit most from their work.

Association of political party affiliation with physical distancing among young adults during COVID-19 pandemic
Researchers estimated the associations of political party affiliation with physical distancing behaviors among young adults, a population with high rates of COVID-19.

Research dispels fears human stem cells contain cancer-causing mutations
Pioneering new research has made a pivotal breakthrough that dispel concerns that human stem cells could contain cancer-causing mutations.

When less is more: A single layer of atoms boosts the nonlinear generation of light
A wide array of technologies, ranging from lasers and optical telecommunication to quantum computing rely on nonlinear optical interaction.

Recovery of an endangered Caribbean coral from parrotfish predation
Orbicella annularis is an important Caribbean coral and an endangered species, yet it is also frequently predated by parrotfishes.

Emerging from the fog: Little understood post-stroke cognitive issues are verified
For the first time, researchers at the University of Maryland have measured the physical evidence of diminished neural processing within the brain after a stroke.

A human gene placed in fruit flies reveals details about a human developmental disorder
Meier-Gorlin syndrome, or MGS, is a rare genetic developmental disorder that causes dwarfism, small ears, a small brain, missing patella and other skeletal abnormalities.

Researchers reveal how our brains know when something's different
NIH scientists discovered how a set of high frequency brain waves may help us unconsciously know when something's different by comparing memories of the past with present experiences.

Social media use increases belief in COVID-19 misinformation
The more people rely on social media as their main news source the more likely they are to believe misinformation about the pandemic, according to a survey analysis.

Novel genomic tools increase the accuracy of breast cancer risk assessment
Findings from the FinnGen study encompassing 120,000 women indicate that inherited breast cancer risk should be assessed in an increasingly comprehensive manner.

Frequency data for stable power supply
In the renewable energies era, grid frequency will be an increasingly important indicator of stability of power supply.

Household transmission of SARS-CoV-2
The findings of this study suggest households will continue to be a significant venue for transmission of SARS-CoV-2 because people with suspected or confirmed infections are being told to isolate at home.

Sheets of carbon nanotubes come in a rainbow of colors
Nanomaterials researchers in Finland, the United States and China have created a color atlas for 466 unique varieties of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

Dallas Heart Study yields new insights about depression
Recently published UT Southwestern research reveals new insights about risk factors for depression based on data from a landmark longitudinal study focused on heart disease.

Mapping corals from the sky guides reef conservation
Using a new airborne mapping approach developed by researchers at Arizona State University's Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science (GDCS), the geographic distribution of live corals was, for the first time, quantified to 16 meters (51 feet) of water depth across the main Hawaiian islands.

Not so fast!: controlling the speed of light bullets
Researchers from Osaka University accurately and arbitrarily control flying velocities of light bullets, offering new opportunities for optical and physical applications.

Chemists from RUDN University synthesized chitin-based antibiotics
?hemists from RUDN University discovered previously unknown derivatives of chitin, a biopolymer that forms the exoskeletons of insects and carapaces of crayfish and other arthropods.

One-step method to generate mice for vaccine research
To develop vaccines, scientists rely on a variety of animal models, including mice that can produce human antibodies through genetically engineered B cell receptors.

Study: Oregon's Western Cascades watershed to experience larger, more frequent fires
Projected changes in temperature and relative humidity are expected to lead to longer fire seasons and more severe fire weather in Oregon's Western Cascade mountains, which in turn will result in larger, more frequent fires.

Critical temperature for tropical tree lifespan revealed
For the first time scientists have provided clear evidence that tropical tree lifespan decreases above a critical temperature threshold.

The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: Black children diagnosed with severe sepsis are more likely to die than White or Hispanic children, hospital data suggests
Black children hospitalized in the US due to severe sepsis have 20% greater odds of death than White or Hispanic children, according to research published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal.

The uncharted molecular language of the brain
A novel method that looks at the molecular composition of brain synapses has revealed three times more proteins than previously thought, finds research published in PNAS.

GSA publishes three new research articles on COVID-19 and aging
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are continuing to publish scientific articles on COVID-19.

Remdesivir likely to be highly effective antiviral against SARS-CoV-2
The drug remdesivir is likely to be a highly effective antiviral against SARS-CoV-2, according to a new study by a team of UK scientists.

Hinder handing the message -- stopping tumors from creating new blood vessels
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have found that vasohibin-1 (VASH1), a protein known to prevent the formation of new blood vessels, acts by changing the conditions of microtubules which bring blocking the certain signal from outside through encumbering transport of its message to the inner of cell.

Scientists discover compounds that could have helped to start life on Earth
Scientists from St Petersburg University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have discovered natural cyclophosphates.

The power of validation in helping people stay positive
Telling a distressed friend or family member something as simple as ''I understand why you feel that way'' can go a long way toward helping loved ones feel better, new research suggests.

Point of Care testing can improve the detection and treatment of influenza
Southampton-led research has shown that implementing point-of-care testing in hospitals to diagnose influenza can lead to better treatment and faster recovery for patients.

Nanoengineered cement shows promise for sealing leaky gas wells
Leaking natural gas wells are considered a potential source of methane emissions, and a new nanomaterial cement mixture could provide an effective, affordable solution for sealing these wells, according to a team of Penn State scientists.

Chronic stress? Zebrafish to the rescue
A team of researchers led by MIPT's Allan Kalueff has studied chronic stress in zebrafish and determined that the animal can serve as a valuable model species for research into the associated brain diseases, complementing research currently done on rodents.

Create a realistic VR experience using a normal 360-degree camera
Scientists at the University of Bath have developed a quick and easy approach for capturing 360° VR photography without using expensive specialist cameras.

FARI publishes new research on omega-3s and heart rate recovery
The Fatty Acid Research Institute (FARI) has published a new research paper in conjunction with The Cooper Institute on omega-3s and heart rate recovery.

Study: More than half unlikely to get COVID-19 vaccine under emergency use authorization
A new study led by a Virginia Commonwealth University professor is among the first to examine the psychological and social predictors of US adults' willingness to get a future COVID-19 vaccine and whether these predictors differ under an emergency use authorization release of the vaccine.

Study reveals networks of genes involved in congenital heart disease
A group researchers at Gladstone Institutes and UC San Francisco led by Benoit Bruneau have made inroads into understanding what genes are improperly deployed in some cases of congenital heart disease.

Explained: Political polarization
Polarization - which divides the population into belligerent groups with rigidly opposed beliefs and identities - has a steely grip on the United States, and a University of Houston researcher reports that economic inequality is to blame.

Virtual reality applied to rehabilitation for stroke and neurodegenerative disease patients
A study performed at one of the Research Centers supported by FAPESP resulted in development of a novel rehabilitation device.

UMaine-led research group find that trees are out of equilibrium with climate
A University of Maine-led research team studied the current ranges of hundreds of North American trees and shrubs to assess the degree to which species are growing in all of the places that are climatically suitable.

Stress in adolescence leads to learning and memory difficulties and increased anxiety in adulthood
Stress experienced around puberty (peripubertal) worsens learning and memory in adulthood, as well as anxiety related behavior, as shown by a study led by Dr Cristina Márquez, from the Neuronal Circuits of Social Behavior laboratory at the Neuroscience Institute in Alicante (Spain).

An alternate savanna
When civil war broke out in Mozambique more than 40 years ago, it largely spelled doom for animals in Gorongosa National Park, a 1,500-square-mile reserve on the floor of the southern end of the Great African Rift Valley, in the heart of the country.

Compound derived from thunder god vine could help pancreatic cancer patients
The results of a pre-clinical study led by researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, suggest how a compound derived from the thunder god vine -- an herb used in China for centuries to treat joint pain, swelling and fever -- is able to kill cancer cells and potentially improve clinical outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer.

Efforts to combat COVID-19 perceived as morally right
According to new research, people tend to moralize COVID-19-control efforts and are more willing to endorse human costs emerging from COVID-19-related restrictions than to accept costs resulting from other restraints meant to prevent injury or death.

Physics discovery leads to ballistic optical materials
A team led by a Purdue University scientist has found a way to create more efficient metamaterials using semiconductors and a novel aspect of physics that amplifies the activity of electrons.

'Magic' angle graphene and the creation of unexpected topological quantum states
Electrons inhabit a strange and topsy-turvy world. These infinitesimally small particles have never ceased to amaze and mystify despite the more than a century that scientists have studied them.

Study shows women less likely to survive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest than men
DALLAS - Dec. 15, 2020 - A study of patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest shows that women have a lower likelihood of survival compared with men and are less likely to receive procedures commonly administered following cardiac arrest.

Higher variability in glomerular filtration rate is associated with higher mortality
In this paper published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases (AJKD), researchers evaluated associations between eGFR variability and subsequent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and all-cause mortality among SPRINT participants.

Biomarkers could help predict severe SARS-CoV-2 infection
Molecular markers in the blood shown to be predictive of severe COVID-19 outcomes resulting from SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus infection have been identified in a study by a Chinese research team.

First 10 days after leaving hospital carry high risk for COVID-19 patients, study finds
In the first months after their COVID-19 hospital stay, patients face a high risk of ongoing health problems, hospital readmission and death, a growing number of studies shows.

Robotic exoskeleton training improves walking in adolescents with acquired brain injury
'At the end of the 4-week training, participants had progressed to a more normal gait pattern,' said Dr.

'Alarmingly high' vitamin D deficiency in the United Kingdom
Over 50 per cent of Asians living in the UK are severely deficient in vitamin D, leaving them more vulnerable to respiratory infections such as COVID-19 and musculoskeletal disorders, according to a large-scale population study published this week.

America's crop cousins are numerous, imperiled, and more needed than ever
A new study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences for the first time outlines how poorly protected these plants are: More than half of the 600 plants assessed in the study may be endangered in their natural habitats, while only 7% are well represented in conservation repositories such as public gene banks and botanical gardens.

Behavioral strategies to promote a national COVID-19 vaccine program
National efforts to develop a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine at 'warp speed' will likely yield a safe and effective vaccine by early 2021.

Researchers create gene expression database to gain new insights into pneumococcal infecti
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine published one of the most comprehensive analyses of how genes get expressed during infection (known as a transcriptome).

COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
1. Accounting for recent population aging is critical for estimating non-COVID-19 excess deaths in the U.S.

Women, parents and early-career faculty in ecology most impacted by COVID-19
The majority of faculty who responded to the survey were negatively impacted on personal and professional levels, and struggling to find a healthy work-life balance.

Fractured bedrock in forests is overlooked source of natural CO2
According to a study led by The University of Texas at Austin, CO2 is being produced deep underground in bedrock fractures.

Quantum mysteries: Probing an unusual state in the superconductor-insulator transition
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology approach the two decade-old mystery of why an anomalous metallic state appears in the superconductor-insulator transition in 2D superconductors.

AI that detects post-stroke depression type can help stroke survivors get right treatment
An AI might soon help stroke survivors get the right treatment by detecting a patient's post-stroke depression type, a frequently seen neuropsychiatric manifestation after a stroke that could impair functional recovery.

Aging, diet-induced obesity, and metabolic disease link explored in new research
Unraveling the links among obesity, aging, telomere lengths and metabolic diseases is the subject of the study published today in Nature Metabolism by a collaborative research team at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

The farthest galaxy in the universe
A team of astronomers used the Keck I telescope to measure the distance to an ancient galaxy.

Survivors of child abuse twice as likely to die young
A world-first study by the University of South Australia has found that survivors of child abuse are more than twice as likely to die young than children who have never come to the attention of child protection services.

UMBC team reveals possibilities of new one-atom-thick materials
New 2D materials have the potential to transform technologies, but they're expensive and difficult to synthesize.

Powerful electrical events quickly alter surface chemistry on Mars, other planetary bodies
On Earth, dust particles are viewed mainly in terms of their physical effects, like erosion.
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