Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

December 15, 2020
To the brain, reading computer code is not the same as reading language
MIT neuroscientists have found reading computer code does not rely on the regions of the brain involved in language processing.

Digital trackers for mental health not yet fit for purpose
Digital tracking of people with mental health conditions has the power to transform medical diagnostics and treatment, but its claims need careful scrutiny, says an expert in digital analytics from the University of Bath.

Better heart health scores in midlife linked to lower risk of late-life dementia
A long-term study of 1,449 people in Finland found that those who had better scores on standard metrics of cardiovascular health in midlife, especially for behavioral factors such as smoking, had a lower risk of dementia later in life.

Structural racism severely impacts the health of foreign-born Blacks and Latinx
Structural racism can lead to discrimination in many aspects of life including criminal justice, employment, housing, health care, political power, and education.

Maximizing the uptake of a COVID-19 vaccine in people with severe mental illness
This Viewpoint discusses individual- and system-level barriers and solutions for people with serious mental illness to access COVID-19 vaccination when it is available.

New, ultrastable tetrahedral "chiral zinc" added to synthetic chemistry toolbox
Researchers have designed and built a new chemical tool inspired by natural metal-containing enzymes in living organisms.

Scientists warn of likely massive oil spill endangering the Red Sea, region's health
A paper to be published in Frontiers in Marine Science on December 15 is calling for action to remove the oil from a decaying and inactive tanker in the Red Sea that holds approximately one million barrels of oil - four times the amount of oil contained in the Exxon Valdez, the tanker that had a disastrous environmental oil spill in 1989 - before its current seepage turns into a massive oil spill into the sea.

Purdue researchers uncover blind spots at the intersection of AI and neuroscience
Is it possible to read a person's mind by analyzing the electric signals from the brain?

Study IDs four things that make people feel good about using chatbots
A recent study has identified four factors that predict user satisfaction with customer service chatbots.

Poverty linked to higher risk of Covid-19 death, study suggests
People in the poorest areas are more likely to be affected by severe Covid-19 - and to die from the disease - than those in more affluent districts, according to a study of critical care units.

Sights set on curbing gun crime
A community or sub-culture encouraging young men's exposure and obsession with guns - as well as ready access to firearms and drugs - can make gun violence 'all too easy', with Flinders University experts promoting a new direction on managing the global problem.

COVID-19 preprint data rapidly influenced critical care practice
In a new research letter published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, researchers examine whether preprint data on the use of the corticosteroid dexamethasone influenced clinical practice in treating COVID-19 critical care patients throughout Australia.

Flexible working time as an opportunity to save costs and increase productivity
The Covid-19 pandemic has turned flexible working arrangements a new reality, but differences in employees' preferences and the financial implications for companies still require unravelling.

Academies call for prompt action to protect biodiversity in the agricultural landscape
The biodiversity in Germany's agricultural landscape has declined considerably in recent years.

Wireless, ultra-thin and battery-free strain sensors that are 10 times more sensitive
A research team from NUS Engineering has developed a new range of strain sensors that are 10 times more sensitive when measuring minute movements.

Too many donor kidneys are discarded in U.S. before transplantation
a large portion of the discarded kidneys would function acceptably if transplanted, according to a new study from a team led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Paris Translational Research Center for Organ Transplantation.

Mystery solved: new study shows link between hot and dry weather and air quality in Korea
Although air quality in Korea has been declining over the past few decades, the reasons behind the steady rise in ground-level ozone concentrations are a mystery.

Mummified baboons shine new light on the lost land of Punt
Ancient Punt was a major trading partner of Egyptians for at least 1,100 years.

Scientists show what loneliness looks like in the brain
This holiday season will be a lonely one for many people as social distancing due to COVID-19 continues, and it is important to understand how isolation affects our health.

How water helps the substrate into the enzyme
Researchers from Bochum and Berkeley have investigated why cages can increase the catalytic activity of enclosed molecules.

Weak force has strong impact on nanosheets
Rice University scientists find the ubiquitous, ''weak'' van der Waals force is sufficient to indent rigid nanosheets, hinting at applications in nanoscale optics or catalytic systems.

Earable computing: A new research area in the making
Research Group (SyNRG) at UIUC is defining a new sub-area of mobile technology that they call ''earable computing.'' The team believes that earphones will be the next significant milestone in wearable devices, and that new hardware, software, and apps will all run on this platform.

Do tumors stiff-arm the immune system?
Cancer cells use an ancient mechanism of self-nonself discrimination to remain hidden from the immune system.

'Chaotic' way to create insectlike gaits for robots
Researchers are embracing chaos and nonlinear physics to create insectlike gaits for tiny robots -- complete with a locomotion controller to provide a brain-machine interface.

Urban land and aerosols amplify hazardous weather, steer storms toward cities
Urban landscapes and human-made aerosols have the potential to not only make gusts stronger and hail larger; they can also start storms sooner and even pull them toward cities, according to new research exploring the impact of urban development on hazardous weather.

Drug for pulmonary hypertension may become an option against cancer
In experiments by Brazilian researchers with mice and tumor cell lines, the drug showed potential to combat metastasis.

AI model shows promise to generate faster, more accurate weather forecasts
A model based solely on the past 40 years of weather events uses 7,000 times less computer power than today's weather forecasting tools.

Costs, COVID-19 risk and delays top older adults' concerns about seeking emergency care
Even before the pandemic, older Americans had concerns about seeking emergency care because of the costs they might face, the amount of time they might spend in the waiting room and the worry that they might end up hospitalized.

Losing money causes plastic changes in the brain
Researchers at the HSE Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience have shown experimentally that economic activity can actively change the brain.

USPSTF statement on screening for hepatitis B virus infection in adolescents, adults
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for hepatitis B virus infection in adolescents and adults at increased risk for infection. 

Undruggable diseases gain a new RNA drug-discovery tool
A new RNA-targeting tool enables scientists to tackle difficult molecular recognition problems to aid drug discovery for incurable diseases.

Device mimics life's first steps in outer space
A device developed by scientists at the CY Cergy Paris University and Paris Observatory promises insight into how the building blocks of life form in outer space.

Discovering gaps in food safety practices of small Texas farms
A survey of small farmers in Texas identifies a significant gap in food safety protocols and resources, increasing the risk of produce contamination and foodborne illness.

Physicians say non-contact infrared thermometers fall short as COVID-19 screeners
While a fever is one of the most common symptoms for people who get sick with COVID-19, taking one's temperature is a poor means of screening who is infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes the disease, and more importantly, who might be contagious.

Genes play a role in common knee injury
It has long been known that the choice of shoe, surface and type of sport can all be contributing factors when someone suffers an anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

Plastics pose threat to human health
Plastics contain and leach hazardous chemicals, including endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that threaten human health.

Researchers use origami to solve space travel challenge
WSU researchers have used the ancient Japanese art of paper folding to possibly solve a key challenge for outer space travel - how to store and move fuel to rocket engines.

Quantifying effects of non-pharmaceutical interventions on SARS-CoV-2 transmission with modeling
Limiting gatherings to fewer than 10 people and closing educational institutions were among the most effective nonpharmaceutical interventions at reducing transmission of SARS-CoV-2, a new modeling study finds.

Coronavirus pandemic: Entering the Christmas season with caution
This year, the pre-Christmas season is accompanied by discussions about a possible strict lockdown.

Attitudes about climate change are shifting, even in Texas
Longstanding skepticism among Texans toward the climate movement has shifted, and attitudes in the nation's leading energy-producing state now mirror those in the rest of the United States, according to new research by UH Energy and the University of Houston Hobby School of Public Affairs.

Gene therapy for placental insufficiency moves toward the clinic
A new study identified an adenovirus gene therapy vector carrying a VEGF isoform.

Proteins enable crop-infecting fungi to 'smell' food
New UC Riverside research shows the same proteins that enable human senses such as smell also allow certain fungi to sense something they can eat.

Cancer researchers identify potential new class of drugs to treat blood and bone marrow cancers
CLEVELAND - A new study by researchers in Cleveland Clinic's Taussig Cancer Institute and Lerner Research Institute describes a novel class of targeted cancer drugs that may prove effective in treating certain common types of leukemia.

Primitive fish fossils reveal developmental origins of teeth
Teeth and hard structures called dermal odontodes are evolutionarily related, arising from the same developmental system, a new study published today in eLife shows.

HSS bone study sheds light on complications after spinal surgery
The microscopic structure of bone appears to predict which patients will experience poor outcomes after spinal fusion, according to a new study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City.

Accurate neural network computer vision without the 'black box'
New research by a team at Duke University offers clues to what goes on inside the minds of machines as they learn to see.

Stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles ease brain bleeding in newborn rats
Murine study, by researchers at Sungkyunkwan University in Seoul, shows how extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can ease IVH-induced brain injuries.

Catalytic activity of individual cobalt oxide nanoparticles determined
Precious metal-free nanoparticles could serve as powerful catalysts in the future, for example for hydrogen production.

Positive messages encourage safer driver behavior than fear tactics
A new study has shown that films demonstrating responsible behavior could lead to young drivers taking fewer risks on the road than if they only saw videos aimed at provoking fear of accidents.

Remote learning here to stay despite challenges, survey finds
About two in 10 U.S. school districts have already adopted, plan to adopt or are considering adopting virtual schools after the end of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

Two tough fungi discovered in Denmark: Devour flies from within
University of Copenhagen researchers have found and described two fungal species for the first time.

New approach can improve COVID-19 predictions worldwide
Methods currently used around the world for predicting the development of COVID-19 and other pandemics fail to report precisely on the best and worst case scenarios.

Moffitt identifies genomic and immune indicators that predict lethal outcomes in prostate cancer
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers conducted studies to determine if genomic heterogeneity in tumors from grade 4/5 prostate cancer patients can be exploited to identify patient subsets that are at higher risk for lethal outcomes and that may benefit from targeted treatment strategies.

Biologists clarify how three species of cephalopods coexist in the Arctic
By analyzing the content of stable heavy isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) in the beaks, the researchers studied three closely related cephalopod species: the highly boreal Rossia megaptera, the wide-boreal-Arctic Rossia palpebrosa, and the Arctic endemic Rossia moelleri, which are sympatric in the Arctic.

A first-in-human clinical trial shows microbubbles augments radiation in liver cancer patients
Bursting gas-filled microbubbles using ultrasound waves sensitizes tumors to targeted radiation, reducing tumor growth and improving overall survival after treatment.

'Peecycling' payoff: Urine diversion shows multiple environmental benefits when used at city scale
Diverting urine away from municipal wastewater treatment plants and recycling the nutrient-rich liquid to make crop fertilizer would result in multiple environmental benefits when used at city scale, according to a new University of Michigan-led study.

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Largest seroprevalence study in the region finds number of people infected with SARS-CoV-2 in Iran may be higher than expected
A study tracking seroprevalence across Iran suggests that the number of people who have had the SARS-CoV-2 virus is 17.1% overall and 20.0% in high-risk occupations.

Nearly half of young drivers are resuming driving just weeks after sustaining a concussion
Researchers found that nearly half of adolescents who sought specialty care for a concussion were back to driving when asked approximately two weeks after the injury, even though few had returned to exercise and sports.

My, what sharp teeth
A new analysis shows dinosaurs and gorgonopsians developed the same specific cutting tooth.

My what sharp teeth you have!
In the dinosaur world, theropods are well known for having blade-like teeth with serrated cutting edges used for biting and ripping their prey.

Delayed Arctic ice advance tracked back to atmospheric conditions near Alaska months prior
Experts in Japan recently discovered that atmospheric conditions near Alaska can affect sea ice conditions in the Arctic Ocean months later.

Water may be an effective treatment for metabolic syndrome
Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have discovered that fructose stimulates the release of vasopressin, a hormone linked to obesity and diabetes.

Hopes of new treatment strategies for glaucoma
In the search for new ways to treat the incurable eye disease glaucoma, researchers at Karolinska Institutet and St.

Climate change caused the demise of Central Asia's river civilizations, not Genghis Khan
While Genghis Khan and Mongol invasion is often blamed for the fall of Central Asia's medieval river civilisations, new research shows it may have been down to climate change.

Empowering women could help address climate change
Current and future damages of climate change depend greatly on the ability of affected populations to adapt to changing conditions.

UMBC researchers identify where giant jets from black holes discharge their energy
Scientists have disagreed about where powerful jets from black holes discharge their energy.

Male bats with high testosterone levels have large forearm crusts when females are fertile
Mammalian odors are frequently sexually dimorphic, with males often exhibiting a stronger, or otherwise distinct, odor relative to females, which can be especially useful for nocturnal species with reduced use of vision.

The melting of the Greenland ice sheet could lead to a sea level rise of 18 cm in 2100!
A new study, headed by researchers from the Universities of Liège and Oslo, applying the latest climate models, of which the MAR predicts a 60% greater melting of the Greenland ice sheet than previously predicted.

Engineers develop soft robotic gripper
Scientists often look to nature for cues when designing robots - some robots mimic human hands while others simulate the actions of octopus arms or inchworms.

Evapotranspiration in an arid environment
Evapotranspiration is an important process in the water cycle because it is responsible for 15% of the atmosphere's water vapor.

Study: Surge of teen vaping levels off, but remains high as of early 2020
Findings released today from the most recent Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey of substance use behaviors and related attitudes among teens in the United States indicate that levels of nicotine and marijuana vaping did not increase from 2019 to early 2020, although they remain high.

Change in use, perceptions of nicotine vaping among US youth 2017-2020
This study estimates how common nicotine vaping is, its perceived harm and the accessibility of nicotine vaping products among U.S. adolescents from 2017 to 2020.

Scientists: Xenon improves properties of maxillofacial and orthopedic implants
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU) jointly with the colleagues from Siberian State Medical University (SSMU) and Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University (IKBFU) studied the properties of calcium phosphate coatings deposited on titanium implants in various inert gases environment.

Survey shows dicamba may reduce the effectiveness of junglerice controls
A recent survey featured in the journal Weed Technology explores the prevalence of junglerice in cotton and soybean crops and whether dicamba interferes with the effectiveness of herbicides used to control the weed.

Type of sugar used to sweeten sheep milk kefir may improve consumer acceptance
The study of human emotions can be used to gauge the sensory acceptance of dairy products.

Study suggests reporting of sexually transmitted infections may be impacted by COVID-19
With the health care community heavily focused on COVID-19 since the first quarter of 2020, there have been concerns that reporting of other diseases -- and the resulting data that enables them to be more effectively treated and controlled -- may have been impacted.

Researchers turn DNA detectives to aid rhino poaching prosecutions with forensic evidence
Researchers at the Wildlife Institute of India (WII), have, for the first time, used unique DNA markers to provide forensic evidence for alleged poaching cases involving the Indian rhino.

Creating a ground plan for stonefly evolution
A team led by the University of Tsukuba microscopically examined the eggs of stoneflies to identify ground plan features and shed light on the evolutionary history of the order.

Fighting hypertension through electrical impulses
Electrical impulses applied to a particular branch of the vagus nerve could be used in the future to reduce complications of arterial hypertension.

Resistance training paired with peanut protein affects muscle health in older adults
Researchers from Auburn University have found that when combined with resistance training, defatted peanut powder can be an effective plant-based protein option for positively affecting select markers of muscle growth and strength in untrained older adults.

Oceanographers have an explanation for the Arctic's puzzling ocean turbulence
MIT oceanographers have an explanation for the Arctic's puzzling ocean turbulence: Their study suggests waters will become more turbulent as Arctic loses summertime ice.

Supporting renewable electricity: EU member states should coordinate reform efforts
The European Union recently adopted more ambitious climate goals for 2030 - their implementation is now the focus of debate.

Balancing climate and development goals
The impact on climate change would only be modest if countries in the process of development were to delay efforts to reduce their carbon emissions until they reach a certain level of economic growth.

Genome sequencing paves the way for more sustainable herring fishery
An international team of Swedish, Norwegian, Danish and Irish scientists has used whole genome sequencing to characterise 53 herring populations from the Atlantic Ocean and the Baltic Sea.

St. Edward's University study finds a manly beard may help drive sales
Business researchers conducted five studies to test the ''power of the beard,'' predicting that the beard would be an advantage in sales and service roles.

How long do doctor visits last? Electronic health records provide new data on time with patients
How much time do primary care physicians actually spend one-on-one with patients?

An avocado a day keeps your gut microbes happy
Eating avocado as part of your daily diet can help improve gut health, a new study from University of Illinois shows.

Surgical and drug treatment options lead to similar outcomes for diabetic eye disease
Surgical and injectable drug approaches are equally effective for treatment of bleeding inside the eye from proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), according to a National Eye Institute (NEI)-supported clinical study from the DRCR Retina Network (DRCR.net).

This is your brain on code: JHU deciphers neural mechanics of computer programming
By mapping the brain activity of expert computer programmers while they puzzled over code, Johns Hopkins University scientists have found the neural mechanics behind this increasingly vital skill.

Changes in outpatient buprenorphine dispensing during COVID-19 pandemic
Outpatient buprenorphine dispensing patterns in Texas before and after the Drug Enforcement Administration temporarily relaxed outpatient buprenorphine prescribing regulations in March 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic were examined in this study.

Augmented reality visor makes cake taste moister, more delicious
Researchers have developed an augmented reality (AR) visor system that enables them to manipulate the light coming off food in such a way as to 'trick' people consuming the food into experiencing it as more or less moist, watery, or even delicious.

Doctoral thesis introduces a scale to measure human's trust in technology
Siddharth Nakul Gulati's scale developed as part of his PhD can give a starting point for both researchers and practitioners alike to measure trust with different forms of technology and decide how they should be designed, developed and deployed.

COVID-19 does not damage auditory system, Tel Aviv University study finds
Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, there have been reports in the professional literature on possible hearing loss caused by the disease.

RNA basic building block produced biocatalytically for the first time
Researchers from TU Graz and acib succeed in the first enzyme-driven biocatalytic synthesis of nucleic acid building blocks.

Error correction means California's future wetter winters may never come
After probing a persistent error in widely used models, PNNL researchers estimate that California will likely experience drier winters in the future than projected by some climate models, meaning residents may see less spring runoff, higher spring temperatures, and an increased risk of wildfire in coming years.

Scientists solve 100-year-old cerebral malaria mystery using neuroimaging techniques
Scientists have shown for the first time that cerebral malaria causes death in adults by triggering oxygen-deprivation in the brain, in new research published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

What is an aerosol-generating procedure?
The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has brought renewed urgency to the question of what constitutes an aerosol-generating procedure. Four factors that explain transmission risk during aerosol-generating medical procedures are discussed in this article.

Drug may boost vaccine responses in older adults
A drug that boosts the removal of cellular debris in immune cells may increase the protective effects of vaccines in older adults, a study published today in eLife shows.

Telemedicine needed to diagnose and treat dysphagia in COVID-19 patients, doctors say
COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind the disease, have caused health care providers to change how they treat patients.

Immune cell that drives breast cancer could be effective target in novel immunotherapies
VCU Massey Cancer Center researcher Paula Bos, Ph.D., identified a type of immune cells that acts as a major driver of breast cancer growth by preventing the accumulation of a specific protein that induces anti-tumor responses.

Scientists discover a new complex europium hydride
A team of researchers from Russia, the United States, and China led by Skoltech Professor Artem R.

Extreme political advertising can hurt campaign efforts
Aggressive political messaging can work against candidates by radicalizing supporters and alienating moderates, according to a Dartmouth study.

3D printers may be toxic for humans
Several studies that aim to characterize and quantify the release and composition, particle size, and residence time in the indoor environment will be presented in the Exposure and Risk Assessment of 3D Printing and Emerging Materials symposium on December 15, from 12:00-1:30 p.m.

New fullerene crystal production method 50 times faster than predecessor
Researchers from Yokohama National University and the University of Electro-Communications in Japan have developed a highly efficient technique for producing a unique fullerene crystal, called fullerene finned-micropillar (FFMP), that is of significant use for next-generation electronics.

The mask matters: How masks affect airflow, protection effectiveness
Even though it has been widely known that wearing a face mask will help mitigate the community spread of COVID-19, less is known regarding the specific effectiveness of masks in reducing the viral load in the respiratory tracts of those wearing them.

Treatment of opioid use disorder among commercially insured patients in context of COVID-19 pandemic
Opioid use disorder treatment during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, including medication fills, outpatient visits and urine tests among privately insured individuals, was compared with 2019 in this study.

Researchers develop Si-based super-high frequency nanoelectromechanical resonator
Recently, a group led by Prof. GUO Guoping from the University of Science and Technology of China of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, collaborating with Prof.

How does pathogen sense environment? Scientists identify key proteins' structures
Recently, a team led by Prof. TAO Yuyong from the School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in cooperation with Hefei National Laboratory for Physics Sciences at the Microscale, revealed the signal transduction mystery inside S. aureus, using a comprehensive application of biochemical and structural biology research methods.

Engineers go microbial to store energy, sequester CO2
By borrowing nature's blueprints for photosynthesis, Cornell University bioengineers have found a way to efficiently absorb and store large-scale, low-cost renewable energy from the sun - while sequestering atmospheric carbon dioxide to use later as a biofuel.

Johns Hopkins Medicine expert weighs devastating impact of COVID-19 on health care workers
During the COVID-19 pandemic, health care workers have been at the forefront of the battle against the life-threatening illness.

Analysis finds gaps in care in treating opioid use disorders during pandemic shutdowns
Study finds no decrease in prescription fills or clinician visits in the first three months of the COVID-19 pandemic for patients recently receiving opioid use disorder therapy.

Novel MRI contrast agent sidesteps toxic effects of current products
Researchers are developing an alternative MRI contrast agent based on manganese, an essential element in human nutrition, that is easily processed and eliminated by the body.

Microbes in dental plaque look more like relatives in soil than those on the tongue
A new study out of UChicago and the Marine Biological Laboratory used state-of-the-art sequencing technology to deep-screen the genomes of microbes known as TM7 present in the mouth.

Fast walking in narrow corridors can increase COVID-19 transmission risk
Simulations have been used to predict droplet dispersal patterns in situations where COVID-19 might be spread and results in Physics of Fluids show the importance of the space shape in modeling how droplets move.

Study shows the impact of genetic diversity on effective alligatorweed control
New research featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management (IPSM) shows that genetics matter when it comes to the effective control of alligatorweed, an invasive plant found in or near aquatic settings

New permafrost thermal stability map better describes the permafrost on the Tibetan Plateau
A permafrost thermal stability map derived from the predicted mean annual ground temperature (MAGT) by integrating multi-remotely sensed indexes and in situ mean annual ground temperature from 237 boreholes on the Tibetan Plateau by using a machine learning model.

Kernels of history
Earlier this year Douglas J. Kennett, a UC Santa Barbara professor of anthropology, demonstrated that maize, or corn, became a staple crop in the Americas 4,700 years ago.

The phantom chorus: birdsong boosts human well-being in protected areas
Although many studies have found that humans benefit from spending time in nature, few studies have explored why.

COVID-19 patients at higher risk of death, health problems than those with flu
A deep dive into federal data by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.

Much of the world may not have access to a COVID-19 vaccine until 2022
Nearly a quarter of the world's population may not have access to a COVID-19 vaccine until at least 2022, warns a study published by The BMJ today.

Bermudagrass versus the armyworm
The fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) is particularly destructive to warm-season turfgrass species, including bermudagrass, a widely popular turfgrass predominantly used of golf courses, athletic grounds, and ornamental landscapes across the country and throughout the world.

Otago study identifies 'three pillars' of good mental health for young adults
Getting good quality sleep, exercising, and eating more raw fruits and vegetables predicts better mental health and well-being in young adults, a University of Otago study has found.

OU-led study focuses on evolutionary determinism and convergence in marine fishes
The stickleback is a well-studied system in freshwater lakes, but the evolution of convergent morphotypes that occupy different positions in the water column in marine environments is less clear.

Reversible superoxide-peroxide conversion drives high-capacity potassium-metal batte
Boosting the energy density is a universal topic for energy storage devices, especially for the low-price potassium-ion battery (KIB) technology, in which the limited specific capacities of cathode seriously hinder its development.

Effects of organohalogen pollution are coded in gene expression profiles of Baltic salmon
Researchers of Ehime University and the University of Helsinki measured hepatic organohalogen (OHC) concentrations and gene expression profiles in Atlantic salmon collected from three areas in the Baltic Sea.

Dartmouth-led research featured in national journal focused on health system performance
New findings published by Dartmouth researchers and featured in a special issue of Health Services Research, are helping to generate new insights and knowledge about the prevalence, roles, and impact of integrated health systems.

Scientists precisely predict intricate evolutions of multiple-period patterns in bilayers
Surface instability of compliant film/substrate bilayers has raised considerable interests due to its broad applications, yet it is still a challenge to precisely predict and continuously trace secondary bifurcation transitions in the nonlinear post-buckling region.

Women face higher risk of death or heart failure following a heart attack: study
Women face a 20 per cent higher risk than men of dying or having heart failure during the five years following a heart attack, according to a new study from University of Alberta cardiology researchers.
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