Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

December 17, 2020
Artificial intelligence classifies supernova explosions with unprecedented accuracy
Scientists from the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian have trained machine learning software to classify supernovae without the traditional use of spectra.

Researchers discover brain pattern that could improve mental health disorder diagnosis
A pattern in how the brain breaks down tryptophan, a common amino acid consumed through food, was discovered by researchers at UTHealth.

UCI researchers create model to calculate COVID-19 health outcomes
University of California, Irvine health sciences researchers have created a machine-learning model to predict the probability that a COVID-19 patient will need a ventilator or ICU care.

Fish oil supplements don't raise bad cholesterol
The Fatty Acid Research Institute (FARI) has published a new research paper in conjunction with The Cooper Institute on the omega-3s EPA and DHA in fish oil and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).

Impaired blood vessel and kidney function underlie heart disease risk in people with HIV
People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have impaired blood vessel function, which increases risk of heart and blood vessel-disease.

Big brains and white matter: New clues about autism subtypes
Researchers found that a long-accepted theory about brain size in some children with autism may not be true.

New path to rare earth mineral formation has implications for green energy and smart tech
Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have shed new light on the formation mechanisms of a rare earth-bearing mineral that is in increasingly high demand across the globe for its use in the green energy and tech industries.

For college students, skin cancer risk remains high in winter months
New research finds college students could be just as at risk for developing skin cancer in the dead of winter as they are in the middle of summer.

Men over 50 have same success with vasectomy reversal outcomes as younger men
In good news for older men, a new study from Keck Medicine of USC published in Urology shows that men over 50 who undergo a vasectomy reversal had the same rate of pregnancy with their partners as their younger counterparts.

Coronavirus spread during dental procedures could be reduced with slower drill rotation
Researchers from Imperial College London and King's College London have found that careful selection and operation of dental drills can minimise the spread of COVID-19 through aerosols.

Electron-producing microbes power sustainable wastewater treatment
WSU researchers have developed a sustainable wastewater treatment system that relies on electron-producing microbial communities to clean the water.

Lithuanian researchers propose combination of methods to improve anticancer drug delivery
Application of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in combination with microbubbles might enhance the delivery of chemotherapy medication used for treating cancers.

Researchers discover protein function that could improve chemotherapy in the future
A protein responsible for orchestrating DNA key signaling and repair pathways could play a role in future chemotherapy treatment for cancer patients.

Still paying for broken smartphone display? Now, It is automatically fixed
Smartphone display repair cost that caused so many people to cry about, it may no longer be an issue to worry about.

Multi-messenger astronomy offers new estimates of neutron star size and universe expansion
Multi-messenger astronomy allows researchers to put new constraints on the radius of a typical neutron star and provide a novel calculation of the Hubble constant.

Shipwrecked ivory a treasure trove for understanding elephants and 16th century trading
An international collaboration of researchers in Namibia, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States reporting in the journal Current Biology on December 17 have found that the cargo of a 16th century shipwreck known as the Bom Jesu included more than 100 elephant tusks, which paleogenomic and isotopic analyses trace to many distinct herds that once roamed West Africa.

Weddell sea: Whale song reveals behavioral patterns
Experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have now used permanently installed underwater microphones, which have been recording for the past nine years, to successfully gather and analyse whale observation data from the Weddell Sea.

Three-dimensional view of catalysts in action
For understanding the structure and function of catalysts in action, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), in cooperation with colleagues from the Swiss Light Source SLS of Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, have developed a new diagnostic tool.

Geology: Alpine summits may have been ice-free during life of Tyrolean Iceman
Alpine summits at 3,000 to 4,000 m may have been ice free until about 5,900 years ago, just before the lifetime of the Tyrolean Iceman (Oetzi), when new glaciers started to form, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.

Seeking to avoid 'full lockdown,' cells monitor ribosome collisions
New research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that cells monitor for ribosome collisions to determine the severity of the problem and how best to respond when things start to go awry.

The latest magnesium studies pave the way for new biomedical materials
Materials used in biomedicine must be characterized by controlled biodegradability, sufficient strength and total absence of toxicity to the human body.

SARS-CoV-2-like particles very sensitive to temperature
A new study found that moderate temperature increases on glass surfaces broke down SARS-CoV-2 virus-like particles structure, while humidity had very little impact.

Patients on ACE inhibitors, ARBs, don't have higher COVID-19 risk, fFnds study
Patients taking ACE inhibitors or ARBs did not have a higher risk of getting COVID-19 or related complications, finds a study of more than 1 million patients taking antihypertensive drugs.

COVID-19 escalated armed conflicts in several war-torn countries
Nine countries were studied - four were found to have reduced conflict but five saw escalations

Squirrels need good neighbours
Living beside familiar neighbours boosts a squirrel's chances of survival and successful breeding, new research shows.

Research breakthrough could transform clean energy technology
A team of researchers has developed a new method of harnessing solar energy, moving us closer to a clean energy future.

Errant DNA boosts immunotherapy effectiveness
DALLAS - Dec. 17, 2020 - DNA that ends up where it doesn't belong in cancer cells can unleash an immune response that makes tumors more susceptible to immunotherapy, the results of two UT Southwestern studies indicate.

How long's too long? Effects of crosslinker length on anion-exchange membrane fuel cells
Anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells (AEMFCs), which produce electricity using hydrogen, are considered an alternative to currently used proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

US needs clear vaccine distribution strategy to defeat coronavirus
An opinion piece published today online calls for a national vaccine strategy now that COVID-19 vaccines are available.

How does immersive reality affect implicit racial bias?
A University of Barcelona study shows that when the virtual scenario is affectively negative, implicit bias increases, and even the illusion of owning a virtual body is lessened.

Taking greenhouse gas analysis on the road, er, rails
Since 2014, the University of Utah has maintained research-grade suites of air quality instruments installed on light rail trains that move throughout the Salt Lake Valley every day.

Scientists set a path for field trials of gene drive organisms
Setting a course for responsible testing of powerful gene drive technology, a multidisciplinary coalition of gene drive organism developers, ecologists and conservation biologists has joined experts in social science, ethics and policy in a policy article published in Science.

How has the COVID-19 pandemic affected measles vaccination rates?
In a recent study published in Pediatrics, researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital evaluated changes in measles vaccination rates from before the pandemic to this summer, when return for clinical care was encouraged.

How scientists are using declassified military photographs to analyse historical ecological change
Researchers are using?Cold?War spy satellite images to explore changes in the environment, including deforestation in Romania, marmot decline in Kazakhstan and ecological damage from bombs in Vietnam.?

Green revolution saved over 100 million infant lives in developing world
New research from the University of California San Diego shows that since modern crop varieties were introduced in the developing world starting in 1961, they have substantially reduced infant mortality, especially for male babies and among poor households.

Seizure risk forecasted days in advance with brain implant data
Patterns of brain activity can be used to forecast seizure risk in epilepsy patients several days in advance, according to a new analysis of data obtained from clinically approved brain implants by neuroscientists at UC San Francisco, the University of Bern, and the University of Geneva.

Study tracks elephant tusks from 16th century shipwreck
In 1533, the Bom Jesus - a Portuguese trading vessel carrying 40 tons of cargo including gold, silver, copper and more than 100 elephant tusks - sank off the coast of Africa near present-day Namibia.

Investigating the carbon intensity of ferries
Ferry emissions are over-proportional with respect to the number of these ships.

UBCO research takes the chill off icy build-up on planes and wind turbines
New UBC Okanagan research is changing the way aircraft and wind turbine operators are addressing the risks related to ice build-up.

Protein linked to progressive lung scarring in scleroderma patients
Osteopontin is discovered as the culprit behind systemic sclerosis patients' main cause of death: lung fibrosis.

New nanobiomaterial from the silk of a mite with 'promising biomedical properties'
An international team of researchers has developed a new nanomaterial from the silk produced by the Tetranychus lintearius mite.

Ultra-thin designer materials unlock quantum phenomena
New research, published in Nature, has measured highly sought-after Majorana quantum states

Organic molecules on a metal surface... a machinist's best friend
Purdue University innovators are working on technologies to make it easier to cut metals.

Infant circumcision may lead to social challenges as an adult undergoing circumcision as an infant
Undergoing circumcision as an infant has delayed psychological complications. This is shown by an international study led by researchers from Aarhus University.

Financial woes grow worse during pandemic for American families
Many Americans have lost their jobs or are working less because of the shutdowns caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Scientists unlock promising key to preventing cancer relapse after immunotherapy
The researchers discovered that cancer immunotherapies that make use of immune system cells such as T cells and CAR-T cells kill not only tumor cells that express the drugs' target, but also adjacent tumor cells that lack the targets, because of the presence of fas.

Scientists create a new phototoxic protein, SuperNova2
Scientists have developed an enhanced version of SuperNova, a genetically encoded phototoxic synthesizer, that helps control intracellular processes by light exposure.

UMD paves the way for growing human organs for transplantation with new proof-of-concept
With the number of people who suffer from organ failures and the growing need for available organs for transplant, finding a new way to provide organs and therapeutic options to transplant patients is a critical need.

A shock to the PPE system
A researcher at The University of Tokyo has shown that the N95 masks used by health care workers to prevent the spread of COVID can be sterilized and recharged using a van de Graaff generator.

Longest intergalactic gas filament discovered
Astrophysicists led by the University of Bonn (Germany) have for the first time observed a gas filament with a length of 50 million light years.

COVID-19 social distancing efforts: implications for cancer control
The consequences of COVID-19-related social distancing on health behaviors that may result in better or worse outcomes for patients with cancer are explored in this Viewpoint.

UBC study highlights need for more effective staffing in care homes
Even the best-managed long-term care homes will need to step up to get through the second wave of the pandemic

Catalyst research: molecular probes require highly precise calculations
Catalysts are indispensable for many technologies. To further improve heterogeneous catalysts, it is required to analyze the complex processes on their surfaces, where the active sites are located.

Drinking water significant source of microplastics in human diet
In an effort to understand the potential risks associated with exposure to micro/nanoplastics, the?Emerging Risks of Micro/nanoplastics: Perspectives From Diverse Sectors symposia at the 2020 Society for Risk Analysis virtual Annual Meeting, December 13-17, 2020,?aims to highlight the current state of knowledge associated with physical and chemical transformation, hazard characterization, environmental effects, social implications and policy limitations.?

Greenland 'knickpoints' could stall spread of glacial thinning
The jagged terrain of Greenland's mountains is protecting some of the island's outlet glaciers from warm coastal waters, according to a team of researchers that included scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and NASA.

Territorial red squirrels live longer when they're friendly with their neighbors
Researchers publishing December 17, 2020 in the journal Current Biology found that red squirrels in the Yukon have a greater chance of survival when living near neighbors.

Improving multi-sectoral ocean management to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals
Researchers from IRD, the CNRS and Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada) have assessed the capacity of the principal ocean management tools to achieve the ''Conserve and sustainably use the oceans'' sustainable development goal (SDG).

NIH researchers discover brain area crucial for recognizing visual events
Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) report that a brain region in the superior temporal sulcus (fSTS) is crucial for processing and making decisions about visual information.

When genetic data meets marketing
The use of genetic data has much potential for marketing purposes, but also poses serious threats.

Pulp succeeded in diet? Determining the slenderization of wood pulp
Osaka University scientists devise a system for measuring the quality of nanofibrillation for wood pulp using its natural optical birefringence.

2D material controls light twice stronger
POSTECH research team identifies second-harmonics generation interference in 2D heterobilayers.

ACE2 protein protects against severe COVID-19: Study
Female COVID-19 patients face less severe disease complications and a lower risk of dying than male patients thanks to hormones and chromosomes that contribute to a stronger immune response, according to new research from a University of Alberta-led team.

Upcycling: new catalytic process turns plastic bags into adhesives
Only a small percentage of plastic bags and other polyethylene packaging is recycled because only low-value products can be made from this waste.

Shark fishing bans partially effective
Bans on shark fishing are only partially effective in protecting sharks, new research suggests.

Change in global precipitation patterns as a result of climate change
The Earth's climate system is largely determined by the differences in temperature between the tropics and the poles.

Can water saving traits help wine survive climate change?
Climate change is expected to make many grape-growing regions too hot and dry to produce high-quality wine from traditional varieties.

Childhood intervention can prevent 'deaths of despair'
Mortality rates among young adults are rising in the US due in part to 'deaths of despair' -- preventable deaths from suicide, drug overdoses and alcohol-related liver disease.

Oceans without oxygen
With no dissolved oxygen to sustain animals or plants, ocean anoxic zones are areas where only microbes suited to the environment can live.

Neurotic people feel worse emotionally during the corona crisis
During the corona crisis, neurotic people experience more negative emotions in their everyday lives, are more unstable emotionally and worry more about their health.

A new means of neuronal communication discovered in the human brain
An international research group has discovered in the human brain a new functional coupling mechanism between neurons, which may serve as a communication channel between brain regions.

Skinnier but resilient geese thriving in the high Arctic
Barnacle geese in the Arctic have been on a diet.

Crops near Chernobyl still contaminated
Crops grown near Chernobyl are still contaminated due to the 1986 nuclear accident, new research shows.

Talking to kids about weight: What the internet says and why researchers are wary
Researchers from the Center for Weight, Eating and Lifestyle Science (WELL Center) in the College of Arts and Sciences at Drexel University systematically reviewed numerous independently published guidelines for having conversations with children about weight status to analyze their content, consistency, actionability and scientific support.

Cataract surgery in infancy increases glaucoma risk
Children who undergo cataract surgery as infants have a 22% risk of glaucoma 10 years later, whether or not they receive an intraocular lens implant.

In fiction, we remember the deaths that make us sad
People may cheer the demise of evil villains in fiction, but the deaths we most remember are the meaningful and sad endings of the characters we loved, research suggests.

Interventional radiology associated with an increased risk for preventable adverse events
In a review article in the journal Radiology, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), suggest there is a critical need to renew understanding of adverse events and complications within interventional radiology.

Nurse practitioners bring big savings to long-term care facilities in Quebec
Countries worldwide face challenges meeting the growing needs for long-term care services because of high costs.

Tiny quantum computer solves real optimisation problem
Quantum computers have already managed to surpass ordinary computers in solving certain tasks - unfortunately, totally useless ones.

Oral contraceptive pills protect against ovarian and endometrial cancer
A comprehensive study from Uppsala University, involving more than 250,000 women, shows that oral contraceptive use protects against ovarian and endometrial cancer.

Reliable COVID-19 test could reduce virus spread
Results of a unique test developed by a world-renowned expert, which targets three viral genes to increase reliability and could cut COVID-19 detection time to 20 minutes, have been peer reviewed and published in the journal Scientific Reports.

New toolkit aims to improve quality of thrombosis data in COVID-19 trials
The ASH Research Collaborative (ASH RC) and the International Society of Haemostasis and Thrombosis (ISTH), two organizations with multidisciplinary expertise in blood clotting and bleeding disorders, have developed a toolkit to help clinical researchers from across medical disciplines design clinical trials that further the understanding of blood clotting events associated with COVID-19.

COVID-19 pandemic had big impact on commercial fishing in Northeast
With restaurants and supply chains disrupted due to the global coronavirus pandemic, two-fifths of commercial fishermen surveyed from Maine through North Carolina did not go fishing earlier this year, according to a Rutgers study that also documented their resilience and adaptation.

Alzheimer's disease: regulating copper in the brain stops memory loss among mice
Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques1 in the patient's brain.

COVID-19-associated ocular neuropathy with panuveitis
A case of COVID-19 with severe ocular neuropathy and panuveitis (inflammation) is reported in this article.

Researchers determine how often cancer patients develop osteonecrosis of the jaw
A landmark study by researchers from the SWOG Cancer Research Network, a cancer clinical trials group funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has found that 2.8 percent of patients on average develop osteonecrosis of the jaw, or ONJ, within three years of starting a common treatment for cancer that has spread to the bone.

Fertilizer runoff in streams and rivers can have cascading effects, analysis shows
Fertilizer pollution can have significant ripple effects in the food webs of streams and rivers, according to a new analysis of global data.

'No such thing as a little bit of pain:' More cancer patients could benefit from rehabilitation
West Virginia University researchers identified the rehabilitation recommendations included in cancer-treatment guidelines from around the world.

Machine learning boosts the search for 'superhard' materials
Superhard materials are in high demand in industry, from energy production to aerospace, but finding suitable new materials has largely been a matter of trial and error based on classical materials such as diamonds.

Finding a personalized approach to treating chronic rejection after lung transplantation
By studying the roles of an inflammatory protein and antibodies in chronic rejection after lung transplantation, researchers discover possibilities for new treatments.

Big data will analyze the mystery of Beethoven's metronome
Data science and physics research at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and UNED has analysed a centuries-old controversy over Beethoven's annotations about the tempo (the playing speed) of his works, which is considered to be too fast based on these marks.

What's up Skip? Kangaroos really can 'talk' to us
Animals that have never been domesticated, such as kangaroos, can intentionally communicate with humans, challenging the notion that this behaviour is usually restricted to domesticated animals like dogs, horses or goats, a first of its kind study from the University of Roehampton and the University of Sydney has found.

Will it kombucha? (video)
Kombucha is a bubbly, fermented tea that has gained popularity in the health and wellness scene over the last decade -- but what is it exactly?

Can white dwarfs help solve the cosmological lithium problem?
For the first time, lithium has been identified and measured in the atmosphere of a white dwarf.

Study: the pandemic's impact on lung cancer
A recent study led by University of Cincinnati Cancer Center researchers shows the impact the pandemic had on lung cancer screening, which experts say could be bad for both screening programs in general and for the overall well-being of patients.

Antifungal drug improves key cystic fibrosis biomarkers in clinical study
A drug widely used to treat fungal infections improved key biomarkers in lung tissue cultures as well as in the noses of patients with cystic fibrosis, a clinical study by researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and the University of Iowa found.

Palliative care improves quality of life for patients with advanced blood cancer
A first-of-its-kind intervention integrating palliative care early in the course of cancer therapy for patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a highly aggressive cancer of the blood and bone marrow, resulted in substantial improvements in patients' quality of life, mood and end-of-life care, a team of investigators has found.

How climate change is disrupting ecosystems
When it gets warmer, organisms rise higher from the lowlands.

Study reports drop in lung cancer screening, rise in malignancy during COVID-19 surge
Reporting on how deferred care worsened outcomes for lung cancer patients when the COVID-19 pandemic first surged in the spring of 2020, researchers from the University of Cincinnati explained that they have identified a framework that could help people with serious health conditions keep up their appointments during the current surge.

Satellite tracking supports whale survival
Extensive satellite tracking has revealed important new knowledge about the little known pygmy blue whale population of Southern Australia.

SARS-CoV-2 infection among patients with cancer undergoing antitumor treatment
The rate of SARS-CoV-2 infection among patients in Italy receiving antitumor treatment was evaluated in this study.

intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor use in France during COVID-19 pandemic
This study quantified changes in the use of intravitreal (IVT) anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (anti-VEGF), the main treatment for retinal vascular abnormalities, since the COVID-19 pandemic started in France.

New discovery opens novel pathway for high-titer production of drop-in biofuels
Using an unusual, light-dependent enzyme and a newly discovered enzymatic mechanism, researchers from Aarhus University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have enabled the biological synthesis of high-yield industry relevant production of climate neutral drop-in fuels from biowaste.

A phantom training program may help acclimate heifers to an automatic milking system
A new study appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science indicates that heifers that participated in a training program using a phantom before introduction to an automated milking system (AMS) visited the actual AMS more frequently, thereby potentially increasing milk yield.

UMD finds more West Nile virus-infected mosquitoes in lower-income areas of Baltimore
Researchers at the University of Maryland found higher rates of West Nile virus-infected mosquitoes in lower-income neighborhoods in urban areas of Baltimore, Maryland.

Neuroendovascular procedures linked to patient back pain
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care performed a prospective study of neuroendovascular patients and found more than 40% suffered back pain during the procedure, signaling a need for clinicians to be more proactive in addressing this complaint.

Hearing loss and high blood sugar linked to poorer learning and memory among older Latinos
Researchers report that hearing loss and high blood sugar are associated with poor cognitive performance among middle-aged and older Latinos.

Developing new classification criteria for improving antiphospholipid syndrome research
An international team of more than 80 collaborators led by Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) investigators is developing new classification criteria for clinical research of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), a life-threatening autoimmune clotting disorder.

Mission to MAARS: Long non-coding RNA may play a key role in cardiovascular disease
Through utilization of genetically modified high-risk atherosclerotic mice, a research team from Brigham and Women's Hospital identified and characterized Macrophage-Associated Atherosclerosis lncRNA Sequence (MAARS), which is expressed specifically in macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques and contributes to the progression of the disease.

Fibrous protein finding may lead to improved bioprinting, tissue engineering
Fibrous proteins such as collagen and fibrinogen form a thin solid layer on the surface of an aqueous solution similar to the 'skin' that forms on warm milk, according to a team of Penn State Researchers, who believe this finding could lead to more efficient bioprinting and tissue engineering.

Outcomes of early tracheostomy for patients with COVID-19
A retrospective medical record review was done of 148 patients to assess outcomes from early tracheostomy in the airway management of patients with COVID-19 who required mechanical ventilation.

Study in mice shows genes may be altered through drug repurposing
Researchers screened drugs that can enhance the PAX6 gene and found MEK inhibitors can stimulate PAX6 expression in the eye.

Improved macaque genome enhances biomedical utility
Using advanced sequencing technology, researchers present a new, improved and far more complete reference genome for the rhesus macaque - one of the most important animal models in biomedical research.

New study measures neighborhood inequality and violence based on everyday mobility
A new study looking at the patterns of movement from 400,000 people offers fresh insights into how a neighborhood's economic conditions mixed with the mobility patterns of its residents and visitors relates to the well-being of the neighborhood and can serve as a predictor of violence.

The most consumed species of mussels contain microplastics all around the world
''If you eat mussels, you eat microplastics.'' This was already known to a limited extent about mussels from individual ocean regions.

HSE researchers use neural networks to study DNA
HSE scientists have proposed a way to improve the accuracy of finding Z-DNA, or DNA regions that are twisted to the left instead of to the right.

Computational model reveals how the brain manages short-term memories
Salk scientists have developed a new computational model showing how the brain maintains information short-term using specific types of neurons.

Researcher boosts vegetable oil production in plant leaves
Jay Thelen, a professor of biochemistry at the University of Missouri, has found a way to boost the production of triacylglycerol -- the main component of vegetable oil -- in plant leaves, a technique that could allow producers to harvest oil from large, leafy plants that also have other uses.

Two new studies offer ways to avert accidents and workplace injuries for American workers
Human error is a causal factor in up to 80 percent of workplace accidents.

Stevens creates entangled photons 100 times more efficiently than previously possible
Super-fast quantum computers and communication devices could revolutionize countless aspects of our lives -- but first, researchers need a fast, efficient source of the entangled pairs of photons such systems use to transmit and manipulate information.

The Lancet Respiratory Medicine: COVID-19 causes more severe disease than seasonal influenza, comparison of data from over 130,000 hospitalised patients confirms
Nearly twice as many people were admitted to hospital for COVID-19 at the height of the pandemic than were for influenza at the peak of the 2018/2019 flu season, a study of French national data published today in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal has found (COVID-19, 89,530 patients vs influenza, 45,819 patients).

Combined observations of neutron stars constrain their equation of state and the Hubble constant
Combining signals from multiple observations of neutron stars has allowed researchers to better understand the properties of ultra-dense matter and constrain the Hubble constant, which describes how fast the Universe is expanding, according to a new study.

LSU health research suggests new mechanism to balance emotional behavior
Research led by Si-Qiong June Liu, MD, PhD, Professor of Cell Biology and Anatomy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, discovered a surprising reciprocal interaction between chemicals in the brain resulting in accelerated loss of molecules that regulate brain cell communication.

Optogenetic method can reveal how gut microbes affect longevity
Optogenetics offers a direct way to manipulate gut bacterial metabolism in a temporally, quantitatively and spatially controlled manner and enhance host fitness.

Research strongly suggests COVID-19 virus enters the brain
The SARS-CoV-2 virus, like many viruses before it, is bad news for the brain.

Improving hospital nurse staffing is associated with fewer deaths from sepsis
According to a new study published in American Journal of Infection Control, improving nurse staffing as proposed in pending legislation in New York state would likely save lives of sepsis patients and save money by reducing the length of hospital stays.

COVID-19 as leading cause of death in US
This Viewpoint uses Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data to compare the COVID-19 mortality rate in 2020 with prior leading causes of death (heart disease, cancer, lung disease and injury) to put into context the cost of the infection in loss of life in the United States.

Healthcare workers have increased insomnia, risk of severe mental health problems: COVID-19 study
University of Ottawa global meta-analysis finds significant mental-health consequences for population, but especially healthcare workers.

UCI engineers reveal molecular secrets of cephalopod powers
In a study published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, University of California, Irvine researchers have revealed the structure of a reflectin variant at the molecular level, and they have demonstrated a method for mechanically controlling the hierarchical assembly and optical properties of the protein.

How can you declutter your mind? New study offers clues
A new neuroimaging study shows for the first time what happens in the brain when we intentionally try to stop thinking about something.

AI-powered microscope could check cancer margins in minutes
Researchers from Rice University and MD Anderson Cancer Center have created a microscope that uses artificial intelligence to quickly and inexpensively image large tissue sections at high resolution with minimal preparation.

Wildfire smoke carry microbes that can cause infectious diseases
Wildfire smoke contains microbes, infectious agents that might cause diseases.

Aboriginal women share their stories on keeping the heart strong
More than a decade after committing $130+ billion to Closing the Gap, there has been little improvement in health outcomes experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations.

CCNY scientists provide new insights into cholera microbe and chances of pandemic strain
Researchers at The City College of New York have uncovered a novel way in which Vibrio cholerae, the aquatic microbe that causes cholera, may increase its competitive fitness, and the likelihood of creating pandemic strains of the bacteria.

The Subaru Telescope photographs the next target asteroid for Hayabusa2
On December 10, 2020 (Hawai?i Standard Time), the Subaru Telescope imaged the small asteroid 1998 KY26, the target of Hayabusa2's extended mission.
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