Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

December 21, 2020
Stanford University study: 12 Tel Aviv University researchers among top 50 in the world
A new study from Stanford University identified 12 Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers among the world's top 50 researchers in their fields.

Screen time, emotional health among parents' top concerns for children during pandemic
New national poll gives a glimpse into parents' greatest concerns about their kids in the pandemic-era.

Citizens versus the internet: Confronting digital challenges with cognitive tools
In the latest issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a team of researchers recommend ways that psychological and behavioral sciences can help decrease the negative consequences of Internet use.

Researchers illuminate neurotransmitter transport using X-ray crystallography and molecular simulations
Scientists from the MIPT Research Center for Molecular Mechanisms of Aging and Age-Related Diseases have joined forces with their colleagues from Jülich Research Center, Germany, and uncovered how sodium ions drive glutamate transport in the central nervous system.

Filled buprenorphine prescriptions for opioid use disorder during COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted health care delivery in the United State, and researchers in this study examined changes in total US retail pharmacy sales and sales of buprenorphine products with a US Food and Drug Administration-approved indication for treatment of opioid use disorder.

Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance could be more challenging outside of the EU
In a new policy report from the Microbiology Society, experts from around the UK explain the desperate need for long-term and ambitious funding for surveillance and research into antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

Gene pathway linked to schizophrenia identified through stem cell engineering
Using human-induced pluripotent stem cells engineered from a single family's blood samples, a gene signaling pathway linked to a higher risk for developing schizophrenia was discovered by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Drinking milk while breastfeeding may reduce the child's food allergy risk
Children of mothers who drink relatively more cow's milk during breastfeeding are at reduced risk of developing food allergies.

Study reveals low risk of COVID-19 infection among patients undergoing head and neck cancer surgery
A recent international observational study provides important data on the safety of head and neck cancer surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Despite same treatment, obese women face more risks for postpartum hemorrhage complications
As part of an academic medical center initiative to improve maternal health, researchers at the University of South Florida Health (USF Health) and Tampa General Hospital (TGH) examined how obesity affected the management and outcomes of postpartum hemorrhage at a tertiary care center.

Researchers explore why some MS patients experience seizures
A research team at the UC Riverside School of Medicine has identified a pathway involving astrocytes, a class of central nervous system support cells, that could shed light on why seizures happen in a subset of multiple sclerosis, or MS, patients.

Exposure to metals can impact pregnancy
Exposure to metals such as nickel, arsenic, cobalt and lead may disrupt a woman's hormones during pregnancy, according to a Rutgers study.

Excess mortality in California during COVID-19 pandemic
Researchers estimated excess deaths in California between March and August during the COVID-19 pandemic by age, sex, race/ethnicity and educational level.

Speeding toward improved hydrogen fuel production
A new material developed by a team led by Berkeley Lab will help to make hydrogen a viable energy source for a wide range of applications.

The upside of volatile space weather
Although stellar flares are typically viewed as a detriment to habitability, study shows ''life might still have a fighting chance.'' Researchers find that flares drive a planets atmospheric composition to a new chemical equilibrium.

Volcanic eruptions directly triggered ocean acidification during Early Cretaceous
New study supports hypothesis that Ontong Java Plateau large igneous province eruptions led to oceanic anoxic event 1a, 127 to 100 million years ago.

Study examines attitudes toward non-native birds
A new study from scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology examines public attitudes toward non-native bird species and whether people are willing to manage them to protect native cavity-nesting birds, such as Eastern Bluebirds and the American Kestrel.

Modeling study suggests mitigation efforts can prevent most college campus COVID cases
As colleges and universities consider strategies for the spring semester to keep COVID-19 cases down, a study in epidemic modeling, led by a team of Brigham and Women's Hospital investigators, may help shed light on what mitigation strategies may be most effective, both in terms of infections prevented and cost.

Current food production systems could mean far-reaching habitat loss
The global food system could drive rapid and widespread biodiversity loss if not changed, new research has found.

Melody of an Alpine summit falling apart
The summit of the 2592 metres high Hochvogel is sliced by dangerous fracture which continues to open.

Fungal RNA viruses: Unexpected complexity affecting more than your breakfast omelet
Traditional approaches for studying fungal RNA viruses have relied upon sequence similarity, resulting in an underestimation of RNA viral genome diversity.

Study identifies amenities parents want in public parks
While parents from diverse backgrounds most often value parks that offer amenities like playgrounds, sports fields and green spaces, they also want parks to feel safe, according to a survey by North Carolina State University researchers.

How to be happier in 2021
''If you want to make a New Year's resolution that really makes you happy, think about the ways in which you can contribute to the world, because the research shows it's not just good for the world but also really good for you,'' says Richard Ryan, an international expert on motivational research and a professor emeritus of psychology at the University of Rochester.

Researchers invent method to 'sketch' quantum devices with focused electrons
A technique created by researchers out of the Department of Physics and Astronomy enables them to ''sketch'' patterns of electrons into a programmable quantum material--lanthanum aluminate/strontium titanate or ''LAO/STO''.

January issue of SLAS Discovery "Cryo-EM: The Resolution Revolution and Drug Discovery"
The January edition of SLAS Discovery features the cover article, ''Cryo-EM: The Resolution Revolution and Drug Discovery'' by Taiana Maia de Oliveira, Ph.D., Lotte van Beek, Ph.D., Fiona Shilliday, Ph.D., Judit E.

What if clean air benefits during COVID-19 shutdown continued post-pandemic?
A new study poses a hypothetical question: What if air quality improvements in New York City during the spring COVID-19 shutdown were sustained for five years without the economic and health costs of the pandemic?

The Achilles' heel of cancer stem cells
Colon cancer stem cells have one weak spot: the enzyme Mll1.

Invasive in the U.S., lifesaver Down Under
New research reveals monitor lizards should be regarded as ''ecosystem engineers'' as they provide food and shelter to other reptiles, insects and mammals, helping prevent extinction.

Difference in blood pressure between arms linked to greater death risk
Robust evidence from a large international study confirms that a difference in blood pressure readings between arms is linked to greater risk of heart attack, stroke and death.

New method for imaging exhaled breath could provide insights into COVID-19 transmission
A new method for visualizing breath that is exhaled while someone is speaking or singing could provide important new insights into how diseases such as COVID-19 spread and the effectiveness of face masks.

Coastal ecosystems 'bright spots'
CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, has identified coastal 'bright spots' to repair marine ecosystems globally, paving the way to boost biodiversity, local economies and human wellbeing.

CRISPR helps researchers uncover how corals adjust to warming oceans
The CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system can help scientists understand, and possibly improve, how corals respond to the environmental stresses of climate change.

Scientists discover a new type of brain cell that could help detect distance
A new kind of brain cell has been discovered which will help to understand how we remember where we left objects, such as car keys and mobile phones.

Wa­ter and genes flow between the two largest Baltic sal­mon rivers
Salmon from upstream reaches of the two northernmost Baltic rivers are different from downstream salmon.

Targeting the deadly coils of Ebola
Computer simulations of the Ebola virus structure are helping to crack its defenses.

New 3D maps reveal inner workings of immune cell gene expression
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted how our small genetic differences can have a tremendous effect on how our bodies respond to disease.

Using wearable activity trackers to distinguish COVID-19 from flu
By analyzing Fitbit data and self-reported symptoms, researchers distinguished trends in heart rate, step count, and symptom duration between patients with flu and those with COVID-19.

Female athletes in WNBA don't return to elite performance for at least 2 years after ACL surgery
Study findings of ACL injuries in WNBA athletes sets return to sport expectations for all female athletes

Looking for dark matter near neutron stars with radio telescopes
In 1983, theoretical physicist Pierre Sikivie found that axions have another remarkable property: In the presence of an electromagnetic field, they should sometimes spontaneously convert to easily detectable photons.

Corona: How the virus interacts with cells
Scientists from Würzburg and the US have charted the first global atlas of direct interactions between SARS-CoV-2 RNA and human host cells.

Targeted brain stimulation dulls social pain
Pairing brain stimulation with an emotion management technique blunts negative emotions, according to research recently published in JNeurosci.

Potential preventative treatment demonstrated for Crohn's disease
A potential preventive treatment for Crohn's disease, a form of inflammatory bowel disease, has been demonstrated in a mouse model and using immune-reactive T cells from patients with Crohn's disease.

Variety: Spice of life for bumble bees
The yield and quality of many crops benefit from pollination, but it isn't just honey bees that do this work: bumble bees also have a role.

Recommendations for the overdose epidemic in the COVID-19 pandemic
A new report from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health offers recommendations aimed at federal, state, and local policymakers to address the opioid epidemic during the pandemic.

How nearby galaxies form their stars
How stars form in galaxies remains a major open question in astrophysics.

Pregnant women whose exercise routines disrupted by COVID-19 show higher depression scores
The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted daily life, including many people's ability to exercise, which can boost mood, reduce stress and benefit one's physical and mental health.

Remote monitoring leads to 4x decline in returns to hospital after joint surgery
The rate of hospital readmissions for hip and knee replacement patients declined from roughly 12 percent to 3 percent when they were enrolled in a ''hovering'' program

New optical fiber brings significant improvements to light-based gyroscopes
Researchers have taken an important new step in advancing the performance of resonator fiber optic gyroscopes, a type of fiber optic sensor that senses rotation using only light.

Young people regarded COVID-19 as a threat to the older generation but not to themselves
During the early stages of the COVID-19 outbreak, young Singaporeans understood the infectious disease to be risky for their parents and older relatives, but not themselves, an NTU Singapore study has found.

Nobel Prize reflects perseverance in scientific research
New Rochelle, NY, December 21, 2020--The 2020 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine went to three researchers for their discovery of hepatitis C virus (HCV).

Breathing rate predicts therapeutic benefits for heart patients
Conditions causing arrhythmia are among the most common cardiac conditions.

Virtual kidney transplant evaluation allows patients to be evaluated from home
A virtual telehealth platform is allowing the surgery program at the Medical University of South Carolina to evaluate and wait-list patients for kidney transplantation despite reductions in direct, in-person health care visits brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic.

New energy conversion layer for biosolar cells
A research team from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum, together with colleagues from Lisbon, has produced a semi-artificial electrode that could convert light energy into other forms of energy in biosolar cells.

Scientists uncover mechanisms that wire the brain's cerebral cortex
A research team at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC has identified the type of brain cell that produces a protein that is crucial for the formation of inhibitory circuits in the brain.

Social media use by young people in conflict-ridden Myanmar
Myanmar youth rely heavily on Facebook for news and information.

Crikey! Massive prehistoric croc emerges from South East Queensland
A prehistoric croc measuring more than five meters long -- dubbed the 'swamp king' -- ruled south eastern Queensland waterways only a few million years ago.

Ancient wolf pup mummy uncovered in Yukon permafrost
While water blasting at a wall of frozen mud in Yukon, Canada, a gold miner made an extraordinary discovery: a perfectly preserved wolf pup that had been locked in permafrost for 57,000 years.

Concerns over infecting others matter more for vaccination in sparsely populated areas
Concerns over infecting others play a greater role in people's willingness to be vaccinated in sparsely populated areas than in dense urban ones, according to new research.

Learning from three centuries of smallpox epidemics in London, UK
The current COVID-19 pandemic has caused a surge of interest in the study of infectious disease transmission, and how control measures could change the course of the pandemic.

Study published on the well-being of small business workers during COVID-19
This study, published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, examined whether safety and health climates were related to employee well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic in a sample of small businesses.

Do I know you? Researchers evaluate how masks disrupt facial perception
The researchers found that the success rate of identifying someone wearing a mask was reduced by 15%.

Brain stem cells divide over months
For the first time, scientists at the University of Zurich have been able to observe the way stem cells in the adult brains of mice divide over the course of months to create new nerve cells.

Researchers identify a rare genetic bone disorder through massive sequencing methods
Researchers of the Cell Biology and Physiology-LABRET group of the University of Malaga (UMA), together with the Networking Biomedical Research Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), have described a new genetic skeletal disorder based on a precision medicine strategy.

Doctors should change the way that they ask patients about self-harm and suicide
Doctors can better help patients with mental health concerns by adopting a different questioning style around self-harm and suicide, experts have said.

Device refines analysis of materials for fuel cells and batteries
Developed at an Engineering Research Center supported by FAPESP, the novel spectroelectrochemical cell can be used to study the behavior of electrolytes and catalysts by means of X-rays and infrared or even visible light.

Sex-specific Alzheimer's treatment could benefit males over females
A University of Ottawa study found a specific Alzheimer's treatment is effective in male and not female mice, providing a window into the biology of the disease and the effectiveness of targeted treatments.

Chemical composition of wild potato relative contributes to its resistance to pathogen
Potato (Solanum tuberosum) is the most consumed vegetable crop worldwide.

Climate warming linked to tree leaf unfolding and flowering growing apart
Climate warming is linked to a widening interval between leaf unfolding and flowering in European trees, with implications for tree fitness and the wider environment, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Ecology.

Brain tissue yields clues to causes of PTSD
A post-mortem analysis of brain tissue from people who had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may help explain enduring mysteries about the disorder, such as why women are more susceptible to it and whether a dampened immune system response plays a role in dealing with stress, a team headed by Yale University researchers has found.

Evolution of a killer: How African Salmonella made the leap from gut to bloodstream
University of Liverpool scientists have exploited the combined power of genomics and epidemiology to understand how a type of Salmonella bacteria evolved to kill hundreds of thousands of immunocompromised people in Africa.

How one pain suppresses the other
When two painful stimuli act on us at the same time, we perceive the one of them as less painful.

The mechanics of the immune system
Not only chemistry plays a role in the docking of antigens to the T-cell; micromechanical effects are important too.

Moffitt researchers discover potential new drug target to treat cutaneous T cell lymphoma
In order to improve their understanding of how CTCL develops in hopes of developing new therapies, a team of Moffitt scientists conducted a series of studies.

Prostate cancer regulator plays role in COVID-19, providing a promising treatment lead
By taking a lesson from prostate cancer, researchers now have a promising lead on a treatment for COVID-19.

Pacify the protein and win over a disease
Will it be enough to pacify the activity of certain proteins in order to hold back the development of many dangerous diseases including Alzheimer's disease?

Research uses a video game to identify attention deficit symptoms
Adapting a traditional endless runner video game and using a raccoon as the protagonist, researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM, in its Spanish acronym), among other institutions, have developed a platform that allows the identification and evaluation of the degree of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents.

Beyond changing DNA itself, mutagens also cause errors in gene transcription
The discovery that toxic stressors can cause errors in gene transcription opens new avenues of research on diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's and sheds light on the potential role of the ''transcriptome'' in aging.

'Race norming' blamed for denying payouts to ex-NFL players with dementia
A UCSF clinical psychologist has taken aim at the National Football League (NFL) for ''race norming'' black players diagnosed with dementia, a practice that is depriving them of the monetary awards allocated to former footballers with neurodegenerative disorders.

Pneumolysis: High altitude specialists explain lung destruction caused by COVID-19
According to the scientific paper, COVID-19's hypoxemia (low oxygen tension in the blood) can hardly be handled by ventilators and should not be considered as pneumonia or treated as a SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome).

Development of plaques in Alzheimer's disease resolved
In Alzheimer's disease patients, the protein amyloid-beta (Aβ) clumps up in the brain to form so-called fibrils.

Hardly any sports -- but more physical activity during lockdown
In spring, when sports clubs closed due to the Corona pandemic, children looked for alternative physical activities.

Loss of anti-tumor protein may cause resistance to certain cancer therapies
The absence of a protein that works to prevent tumor formation may explain why some patients are resistant to a common cancer therapy, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

Big step with small whirls
Skyrmions are small magnetic objects that could revolutionize the data storage industry and also enable new computer architectures.

Discovery of 66 new Roman Army sites shows more clues about one of the empire
The discovery of dozens of new Roman Army sites thanks to remote sensing technology has revealed more about one of the empire's most infamous conflicts.

Diseased cell fragments burst from pockets in immune cells to activate response
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have uncovered an important process in how our immune system detects signs of disease and activates a protective response.

New research shows masks change the way we process faces
New study finds that our ability to recognize faces is severely impaired by masks, and this decreased face perception is impacting our social interactions with others.

High-five or thumbs-up? New device detects which hand gesture you want to make
A new device developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can recognize hand gestures based on electrical signals detected in the forearm.

Scientists develop an efficient way to produce low-cost heatsinks
NUST MISIS scientists found a way to reduce the cost of industrial and electronics heatsinks production up to 10 times.

New model reveals previously unrecognized complexity of oceanic earthquake zones
University of Tsukuba researchers constructed a state-of-the-art model based on seismic data from the January 2020 Caribbean earthquake.

Sixfold increase in risk
A research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has quantified the effects of an infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) on the development of cervical cancer.

California lockdown suppressed excess pandemic deaths
Nearly 20,000 more Californians died in the first six months of the pandemic than would have been expected to die in a normal year, with a disproportionate number of those deaths occurring among older adults, black or Latino residents, or those who had not completed high school, according to an analysis by researchers at UC San Francisco.

Under Antarctica's ice, Weddell seals produce ultrasonic vocalizations
Weddell seals are chirping, whistling and trilling under Antarctica's ice at sound frequencies that are inaudible to humans, according to a research team led by University of Oregon biologists.

New phase for synthetic aperture microscopy
Although SAM is undoubtedly a promising approach, current implementations lack in both spatial resolution and frame rate to be useful for emerging applications.

Nanoplastics alter intestinal microbiome and threaten human health
A review study led by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), the CREAF and the University of Aveiro concludes that nanoplastics change the composition and diversity of gut microbiome in vertebrates and invertebrates.

Deep, slow-slip action may direct largest earthquakes and their tsunamis
Megathrust earthquakes and subsequent tsunamis that originate in subduction zones like Cascadia -- Vancouver Island, Canada, to northern California -- are some of the most severe natural disasters in the world.

New catalytic approach to accessing key intermediate carbocation
This study revealed the development of a novel iridium based catalyst.

SwRI-led team finds meteoric evidence for a previously unknown asteroid
A Southwest Research Institute-led team of scientists has identified a potentially new meteorite parent asteroid by studying a small shard of a meteorite that arrived on Earth a dozen years ago.

CNIO and IRB Barcelona assemble the gamma-tubulin ring complex in vitro for the first time
This work paves the way for the in vitro study of the nucleation process that is essential for assembly and organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton.

Arthritis drug may treat immunotherapy-related heart complication
A drug typically prescribed for rheumatoid arthritis may also be effective in treating a rare but potentially deadly heart complication some cancer patients experience after taking immunotherapies, according to a study published in Cancer Discovery and co-led by investigators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC).

Enhanced scorpion venom molecules can be used to treat Chagas disease
Brazilian researchers tested the antichagasic properties of VmCT1, obtained from the venom of Vaejovis mexicanus, a scorpion harmless to humans, and synthesized novel analogs to redesign the native molecule

Community-based COVID-19 testing site highlight importance of understanding the virus'
Results from community-based COVID-19 testing site found that one in four kids tested positive, with minorities impacted at higher rate

Child care facilities can be safe and are essential: new Case Western Reserve study
Child care programs can be safe within the context of low community transmission of COVID-19, according to research from Case Western Reserve University, based on data from child care programs throughout Ohio.

Blood alcohol levels much lower than the legal limit impair hand-eye coordination
In previous studies, eye movements and vision were only affected at blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) approaching the legal limit for driving (0.08% BAC), in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Scientists complete yearlong pulsar timing study after reviving dormant radio telescopes
While the scientific community grapples with the loss of the Arecibo radio telescope, astronomers who revived a long-dormant radio telescope array in Argentina hope it can help compensate for the work Arecibo did in pulsar timing.

Digging deep for differences in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
A UT Southwestern research team has catalogued gene activity in the skeletal muscle of mice, comparing healthy animals to those carrying a genetic mutation that causes Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD) in humans.

Light signal emitted during photosynthesis used to quickly screen crops
University of Illinois researchers have revealed a new approach to estimate the photosynthetic capacity of crops to pinpoint their top-performing traits and speed up the plant screening process, according to a new study in the Journal of Experimental Botany

Regulating off-centering distortion maximizes photoluminescence in halide perovskites
In work published in the National Science Review (nwaa288), a team at HPSTAR led by Dr.

Traditional model for disease spread may not work in COVID-19
A mathematical model that can help project the contagiousness and spread of infectious diseases like the seasonal flu may not be the best way to predict the continuing spread of the novel coronavirus, especially during lockdowns that alter the normal mix of the population.

Reston ebolavirus spreads efficiently in pigs
Reston ebolavirus (RESTV) should be considered a livestock pathogen with potential to affect other mammals, including people.

Brazilian researcher experiments with electron-plasma interactions
The study could help upgrade satellite communications equipment.

Discovery: How Colorado potato beetles beat pesticides
New research shows that pesticides alter how Colorado potato beetles manage their DNA.

Scientists and philosopher team up, propose a new way to categorize minerals
Minerals are the most durable, information-rich objects we can study to understand our planet's origin and evolution.

Silkworm's brain determines diapause by thermal information
Silkworms (Bombyx mori) were found to lay diapause eggs at 25°C and non-diapause eggs at 15°C.

Hormone metabolites found in poop give researchers new insight into whale stress
Poop samples are an effective, non-invasive tool for monitoring gray whale reproduction, stress and other physiological responses.

Optoelectronic devices that emit warm and cool white light
A single semiconducting material can produce white light by emitting light across the visible spectrum.

Consumers challenged by high status peers make a 'status pivot,' new study finds
When outshone by peers in one area of life, such as financial success, consumers will embrace making a 'status pivot' to show prowess in another aspect of life, such as personal relationships, social life, parenting, physical and mental health, and fitness, according to a new report by researchers from Boston College, Boston University and London Business School.

Cellular exclusion of mitochondria protects cells from damage
Researchers from Osaka University identified mitochondrial release out of cells as a novel mechanism by which cells turn over mitochondria and maintain cell health.

Research analyzes academic abstracts written by students
A recent study by Maria Dolors Cañada and Carme Bach of the Gr@el research group at the Department of Translation and Language Sciences, which analyses the abstracts of final year projects by students on the bachelor's degree in Applied Languages, with the aim of helping them achieve discourse competence.

Climate change: threshold for dangerous warming will likely be crossed between 2027-2042
The threshold for dangerous global warming will likely be crossed between 2027 and 2042 - a much narrower window than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's estimate of between now and 2052.

New population of blue whales discovered in the western Indian ocean
An international team of researchers has discovered what it believes to be a new population of blue whales in the western Indian Ocean.

Waste to treasure: Crayfish shells to store energy
Other than a spicy night snack, the crayfish has been endowed with greater significance.

Antigen tests -- are self-collected nasal swabs a reliable option?
Under certain conditions, antigen testing using self-collected swabs from the anterior nose may constitute a reliable alternative to antigen testing using nasopharyngeal swabs collected by health professionals.

Ecosystem dynamics: Topological phases in biological systems
Physicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that topological phases could exist in biology, and in so doing they have identified a link between solid-state physics and biophysics.

Researchers track and analyze smallpox epidemics over three centuries
Researchers from McMaster University have studied and analyzed thousands of weekly records documenting the deaths of smallpox victims in London, England over the span of nearly 300 years.

The far-reaching effects of mutagens on human health
Mutagenic threats to a cell's subtle machinery may be far more widespread than previously appreciated.

A full blood count of COVID-19 patients can predict disease severity
International research led by the Radboud university medical center shows that a full blood count of COVID-19 patients predicts fairly accurately whether the infection will have a complicated course or not.

Study: Bumble bees lacking high-quality habitat have higher pathogen loads
Bumble bees found in low-quality landscapes -- characterized by a relative lack of spring flowers and quality nesting habitat -- had higher levels of disease pathogens, as did bumble bees in areas with higher numbers of managed honey bee hives, according to research led by Penn State scientists.

Experiments first verify distributed quantum phase estimation
Professor PAN Jianwei and his colleges from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have achieved the experimental verification of distribution quantum phase estimation for the first time.

ACP, Annals of Internal Medicine host virtual COVID-19 Vaccine Forum II for physicians
As COVID-19 vaccines are becoming available, physicians and other health care professionals must do the hard work of making sure sufficient numbers of people are vaccinated to end the pandemic.

New flower from 100 million years ago brings fresh holiday beauty to 2020
Researchers have identified a spectacular new genus and species of flower from the mid-Cretaceous period, a male specimen whose sunburst-like reach for the heavens was frozen in time by Burmese amber.

New study: available drugs can prevent rejection and tissue injury after transplantation
Controlling inflammation after transplantation of organs, cells, or tissues is critical for graft survival; however, it can be difficult.

Frequent, fast, accessible testing should be public health tool during COVID-19 pandemic
In a perspective piece published in Science, Brigham and Women's Hospital's Michael Mina, MD, PhD, and his co-author, Kristian G.

Preventing nurse suicides as new study finds shift in method
UC San Diego researchers find a distinct shift from using pharmacological poisoning to firearms in female nurses who die by suicide.

Anti-diarrhoea drug drives cancer cells to cell death
In cell culture, loperamide, a drug commonly used against diarrhoea, proves effective against glioblastoma cells.

Three flavors are better than one -- in ice cream and supernova research
New research from Northwestern University has found that by studying all three ''flavors'' involved in a supernova, they've unlocked more clues as to how and why stars die.
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