Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

December 29, 2020
Assessment of neutrophil extracellular traps in coronary thrombus of case series of patients with COVID-19
Severe COVID-19 is characterized by the intense formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), leading to the blockage of microvessels, as shown in pulmonary samples.

Brain imaging predicts PTSD after brain injury
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex psychiatric disorder brought on by physical and/or psychological trauma.

Imaging of ballistic wounds, bullet composition and implications for MRI safety
According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), because patients with ballistic embedded fragments are frequently denied MRI (due to indeterminate bullet composition sans shell casings), radiography and CT can be used to identify nonferromagnetic projectiles that are safe for MRI.

Patient characteristics associated with telemedicine access during COVID-19 pandemic
This study identified racial/ ethnic, sex, age, language, and socioeconomic differences in accessing telemedicine for primary care and specialty ambulatory care; if not addressed, these differences may compound existing inequities in care among vulnerable populations.

Electrons hop to it on twisted molecular wires
Osaka University scientists show how purposely introducing twists into molecular wires can improve their electrical conductivity.

Stopping RAS inhibitors tied to worse outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease
Small studies have suggested that a group of medications called RAS inhibitors may be harmful in persons with advanced chronic kidney disease, and physicians therefore often stop the treatment in such patients.

Significant disparities in telemedicine use, especially among older and POC patients
Older people as well as minorities, non-English speakers and those with lower incomes face inequities in accessing telemedicine care

College football players underestimate risk of injury and concussion
College football players may underestimate their risk of injury and concussion, according to a new study published today in JAMA Network Open. Christine Baugh, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and member of the CU Center for Bioethics and Humanities, is the corresponding author of the article, ''Accuracy of US College Football Players' Estimates of Their Risk of Concussion or Injury.''

Protein twist and squeeze confers cancer drug resistance
In 1986, cellular biochemist Kazumitsu Ueda, currently at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), discovered that a protein called ABCB1 could transport multiple chemotherapeutics out of some cancer cells, making them resistant to treatment.

Order and disorder in crystalline ice explained
Unlike most other materials, ice at very low temperature is not as ordered as it could be.

The puzzle of nonhost resistance: why do pathogens harm some plants but not others?
There are many examples of plants that are susceptible to one pathogen but able to resist another closely related pathogen.

Story tip from Johns Hopkins expert on Covid-19
In a study that looked at suicide deaths during 2020's first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Maryland, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers found that, contrary to general predictions of suicides skyrocketing, suicides in the overall population actually dropped, relative to previous years.

Army research leads to more effective training model for robots
Multi-domain operations, the Army's future operating concept, requires autonomous agents with learning components to operate alongside the warfighter.

Study examines the most effective COVID-19 control policies
A timely new study published by PLOS ONE examines the effectiveness of COVID-19 control policies in 40 jurisdictions including countries and U.S. states.

UCLA scientists develop high-throughput mitochondria transfer device
Scientists from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer have developed a simple, high-throughput method for transferring isolated mitochondria and their associated mitochondrial DNA into mammalian cells.

A single gene 'invented' haemoglobin several times
Thanks to the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii, an animal whose genes have evolved very slowly, scientists from CNRS, Université de Paris and Sorbonne Université, in association with others at the University of Saint Petersburg and the University of Rio de Janeiro, have shown that while haemoglobin appeared independently in several species, it actually descends from a single gene transmitted to all by their last common ancestor.

Polysaccharides from red algae affect mice immune systems, say FEFU scientists
Carrageenans, biologically active polysaccharides isolated from red algae and widely used in the food industry as stabilizers, thickeners, or jelly agents have an express effect on the immune systems of mice, a study reports.

Large transporter protein linked to schizophrenia
Scientists have suspected mutations in a cellular cholesterol transport protein are associated with psychiatric disorders, but have found it difficult to prove this and to pinpoint how it happens.

Scientists turned toxic pesticide into treatment against antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Russian scientists from Kaliningrad and St. Petersburg have synthesized nitrogen-containing cyclic compounds that differ only in the relative position of side substituents.

In plants, channels set the rhythm
Like animals, plants have 'molecular switches' on the surface of their cells that transduce a mechanical signal into an electrical one in milliseconds.

Sustained cellular immune dysregulation in individuals recovering from COVID-19
Ongoing observational clinical research has become a priority to better understand how the COVID-19 virus acts, and findings from this research can better inform treatment and vaccine design.

Sugars influence cell-to-surface adhesion
An international team of researchers examined how movement and adhesion in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can be manipulated.

Imaging the twilight zone
What happens in the brain when our conscious awareness fades during general anesthesia and normal sleep?

An explanation for the lack of blood oxygenation detected in many COVID-19 patients
Researchers at the Seville Institute of Biomedicine (IBIS) describe the presence in the human carotid body, the organ that senses oxygen in the blood, of the protein (ECA2) through which SARS-CoV-2 infects cells.

Flag leaves could help top off photosynthetic performance in rice
A team from the University of Illinois and the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) found that some flag leaves of different varieties of rice transform light and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates better than others, potentially opening new opportunities for breeding higher yielding rice varieties.

2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend grains at all life stages
The Grain Chain, a farm to fork coalition of stakeholders in the grain industry sector and chaired by the American Bakers Association (ABA), celebrates the recommendation published today in the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs) to ''consume half of your grains from whole grain sources'' and the remainder from enriched grains.

Detective work in theoretical physics
Physicists at the Universities of Münster and Düsseldorf in Germany have published a review article on the so-called dynamical density functional theory (DDFT).

UC researcher urges caution using remdesivir to treat COVID-19
Research at the University of Cincinnati, however, contends that this antiviral drug is being used too indiscriminately when treating patients hospitalized with the virus.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.