Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

January 08, 2021
The Lancet: Most patients hospitalised with COVID-19 have at least one symptom six months after falling ill, Wuhan follow-up study suggests
More than three quarters of COVID-19 patients have at least one ongoing symptom six months after initially becoming unwell, according to research published in The Lancet.

More than half of people using cannabis for pain experience multiple withdrawal symptoms
More than half of people who use medical marijuana products to ease pain also experience clusters of multiple withdrawal symptoms when they're between uses, a new study finds.

When salespeople advocate for sellers and customers
The most favorable outcomes result when the salesperson engages in high levels of both customer advocacy and seller advocacy.

Preserving workers' hearing health by improving earplug efficiency
How could we improve the comfort and effectiveness of these earplugs?

Including unhealthy foods may diminish positive effects of an otherwise healthy diet
Researchers at Rush University Medical Center have reported diminished benefits of a Mediterranean diet among those with high frequency of eating unhealthy foods.

Peter Raven addresses earth's dwindling resources, the value of science-informed outreach
The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscienceaibs.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.

Study: Religion, psychology share methods for reducing distress
Religious people facing life crises rely on emotion-regulation strategies that psychologists also use, a new study finds.

Novel RNA factors may help cancer cells thrive
Recent work by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital pinpoints critical changes in an enzyme known as DICER, which create a cascade of effects on this microRNAome.

Single-dose COVID-19 vaccine triggers antibody response in mice
Across the world, health care workers and high-risk groups are beginning to receive COVID-19 vaccines, offering hope for a return to normalcy amidst the pandemic.

COVID forced psychiatric care online. Many patients want it to stay there, study finds
A new study suggests that more than half of outpatient psychiatry patients whose appointments were suddenly converted to video or phone interactions by the pandemic will want to keep going with virtual mental health care even after the pandemic subsides.

UCF engineering and biology researchers collaborate to aid coral reef restoration
Florida's threatened coral reefs have a more than $4 billion annual economic impact on the state's economy, and University of Central Florida researchers are zeroing in on one factor that could be limiting their survival - coral skeleton strength.

Scientists develop a cheaper method that might help create fuels from plants
Scientists have figured out a cheaper, more efficient way to conduct a chemical reaction at the heart of many biological processes, which may lead to better ways to create biofuels from plants.

New analysis highlights importance of groundwater discharge into oceans
An invisible flow of groundwater seeps into the ocean along coastlines all over the world.

Antibiotic resistance from random DNA sequences
An important and still unanswered question is how new genes that cause antibiotic resistance arise.

How 'Iron Man' bacteria could help protect the environment
In a new study, researchers show that microbes are capable of an incredible feat that could help reclaim a valuable natural resource and soak up toxic pollutants.

USTC develops ultrahigh-performance plasmonic metal-oxide materials
In a study published in Advanced Materials, the researchers from Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, the University of Science and Technology of China of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, using an electron-proton co-doping strategy, invented a new metal-like semiconductor material with excellent plasmonic resonance performance.

We hear what we expect to hear
Dresden neuroscientists show that the entire auditory pathway represents sounds according to prior expectations.

Understanding how to improve antibodies targeting OX40 for the treatment of cancer
Scientists at the University of Southampton's Centre for Cancer Immunology have gained new insight into how the immune system can be better used to find and kill cancer cells.

Scientists from St. Petersburg University discovered the virus-like particles in Bryozoa
Scientists from Russia, Austria, and the USA have discovered virus-like particles in the bacterial symbionts of Bryozoa -- a phylum of colonial aquatic invertebrates - filter-feeders dominating in many bottom ecosystems.

Tasmanian tiger pups found to be extraordinary similar to wolf pups
Researchers find more similarities between the thylacine and wolf.

Mapping the introduction of the COVID-19 epidemic in the United Kingdom using genomic analysis
The SARS-CoV-2 virus was introduced to the United Kingdom well over 1,000 times in early 2020, according to researchers who analyzed more than 50,000 viral sequences from the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK.

Detecting COVID-19 antibodies in 10-12 seconds
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University report findings on an advanced nanomaterial-based biosensing platform that detects, within seconds, antibodies specific to SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Nanoparticle vaccine for COVID-19
Researchers at Stanford are working to develop a single-dose vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 that could potentially be stored at room temperature.

Nanocrystals that eradicate bacteria biofilm
POSTECH-UNIST joint research team finds ways to control the surface texture of nanostructures.

Scientists discover slimy microbes that may help keep coral reefs healthy
Microbes living within the slimy biofilms of some coral species may help protect the coral against excess nitrogen levels, according to research from MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), in collaboration with colleagues in Cuba.

New tech helping cancer patients manage symptoms
Hundreds of cancer patients have benefitted from using computer algorithms to manage their symptoms and improve their wellbeing in a unique UK trial by the University of Leeds.

Research finds increased trust in government and science amid pandemic
New Curtin University research has found a dramatic increase in people's trust in government in Australia and New Zealand as a result of the COVID pandemic.

Autism theory 25 years in the making
A unifying explanation of the cause of autism and the reason for its rising prevalence has eluded scientists for decades, but a theoretical model published in the journal Medical Hypotheses describes the cause as a combination of socially valued traits, common in autism, and any number of co-occurring disabilities.

Tiny wireless device sheds light on combating obesity
In a new study, researchers at Texas A&M University have described a medical device that might help with weight loss and requires a simpler operative procedure for implantation.

'Invisible' stem cells evade natural killer cells using immune 'off-switch'
UC San Francisco scientists have discovered a new way to control the immune system's 'natural killer' (NK) cells, a finding with implications for novel cell therapies and tissue implants that can evade immune rejection.

Possible explanation for more efficient maize growth
Plant researchers at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) have investigated the transport of compounds in maize.

COVID-19: Online tool identifies patients at highest risk of deterioration
A new risk-stratification tool which can accurately predict the likelihood of deterioration in adults hospitalised with COVID-19 has been developed by researchers from the UK Coronavirus Clinical Characterisation Consortium (known as ISARIC4C).

High-speed atomic force microscopy visualizes cell protein factories
Factor-pooling by ribosomes caught on video using state-of-art high-speed atomic force microscopy technology.

New statistical method exponentially increases ability to discover genetic insights
A test of the Sum-Share statistical method with only summary-level data found 1,734 genetic variations associated with cardiovascular-related conditions when just one had previously been likely.

Cardiac MRI shows lower degrees of myocarditis in athletes recovered from COVID-19
In a letter published in the December issue of the American Heart Association's medical journal Circulation a group of researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) dispute the most recent findings of the incidence of myocarditis in athletes with a history of COVID-19.

Measuring racial inequities in COVID-19 testing
This study adapted a well-established tool for measuring inequity from economics--the Lorenz curve--to measure racial inequities in COVID-19 testing.

Unravelling the mystery that makes viruses infectious
Researchers have for the first time identified the way viruses like the poliovirus and the common cold virus 'package up' their genetic code, allowing them to infect cells.

NIST publishes a beginner's guide to DNA origami
Jacob Majikes and Alex Liddle, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) who have studied DNA origami for years, have compiled the first detailed tutorial on the technique.

Bacteria can tell the time
New research reveals that bacteria have internal clocks that align with the 24-hour cycle of life on Earth.

Botulism breakthrough? Taming botulinum toxin to deliver therapeutics
Currently there's no treatment for botulism once the toxin gets into neurons.

Which came first, sleep or the brain?
In work that could help unravel the origin of sleep, an international team of researchers led by Kyushu University has shown that tiny, water-dwelling hydras not only show signs of a sleep-like state despite lacking central nervous systems but also respond to molecules associated with sleep in more evolved animals.

Bats with white-nose syndrome prefer suboptimal habitats despite the consequences
Bats are mistakenly preferring sites where fungal growth is high and therefore their survival is low.

Researchers realize efficient generation of high-dimensional quantum teleportation
In a study published in Physical Review Letters, the team led by academician GUO Guangcan from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) made progress in high dimensional quantum teleportation.

Perceiving prosthesis as lighter thanks to neurofeedback
Transmitting sensory signals from prostheses to the nervous system helps leg amputees to perceive prosthesis as part of their body.

Entangling electrons with heat
Quantum entanglement is key for next-generation computing and communications technology, Aalto researchers can now produce it using temperature differences.

Initial severity of COVID-19 not associated with later respiratory complications
A new study published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society examines the recovery of lung function and overall wellness in individuals who had varying degrees of COVID-19 severity.

Study reveals jellyfish create a 'virtual wall' to enhance performance
New discovery finds that Jellyfish create a ''ground effect,'' similar to how air squeezes between an airplane and ground during take-off, which builds pressure and a force that boosts performance.

Engineers find antioxidants improve nanoscale visualization of polymers
Reactive molecules, such as free radicals, can be produced in the body after exposure to certain environments or substances and go on to cause cell damage.

Scientists paint multi-color atlas of the brain
Columbia scientists have engineered a coloring technique, known as NeuroPAL (a Neuronal Polychromatic Atlas of Landmarks), which makes it possible to identify every single neuron in the mind of a worm.

Ferroptosis resistance in cancer: An emerging crisis of new hope
Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this opinion article the authors Daiyun Xu, Yonghui Lü, Yongxiao Li, Shengbin Li, Zhe Wang and Junqing Wang from Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China discuss ferroptosis resistance in cancer.

Researchers take key step toward cleaner, more sustainable production of hydrogen
Efficiently mass-producing hydrogen from water is closer to becoming a reality thanks to Oregon State University College of Engineering researchers and collaborators at Cornell University and the Argonne National Laboratory.

Latina mothers, often essential workers, report COVID-19 took toll
More than half of Latina mothers surveyed in Yolo and Sacramento counties reported making economic cutbacks in response to the pandemic shutdown last spring -- saying they bought less food and missed rent payments.

Chandra studies extraordinary magnetar
In 2020, astronomers added a new member to an exclusive family of exotic objects with the discovery of a magnetar.

Large study finds higher burden of acute brain dysfunction for COVID-19 ICU patients
COVID-19 patients admitted to intensive care in the early months of the pandemic were subject to a significantly higher burden of delirium and coma than is typically found in patients with acute respiratory failure.

Bioenergetics: New features of ATP synthase
Structural studies of a mitochondrial ATP synthase illustrate the basis for the diversity of its membrane-shaping properties.

Gene therapy strategy found effective in mouse model of hereditary disease TSC
Patients with a genetic disorder called tuberous sclerosis complex have noncancerous tumors growing in numerous organs, and their treatment options are limited.

Immune cells discovered in the lungs improve virus defense
A research team at the University of Basel has discovered immune cells resident in the lungs that persist long after a bout of flu.

Child marriage is legal and persists across Canada
Canada is at the forefront of global efforts to end child marriage abroad.

New findings help explain how COVID-19 overpowers the immune system
Seeking to understand why COVID-19 is able to suppress the body's immune response, new research from the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology suggests that mitochondria are one of the first lines of defense against COVID-19 and identifies key differences in how SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, interacts with mitochondrial genes when compared to other viruses.

Shriners Hospitals for Children study reveals new link to arthritis
A new study by investigators at the Shriners Hospital for Children -- St.

Accelerating AI computing to the speed of light
A University of Washington-led team has come up with a system that could help speed up AI performance and find ways to reduce its energy consumption: an optical computing core prototype that uses phase-change material.

Stem cells use a piston-like engine to 'drive' to their destinations
Researchers extracted stem cells from bone marrow and used hydrogels to mimic the tissues that compose their biological environments.
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