Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

January 11, 2021
U.S. mental health system needs broad changes to improve access and quality
The U.S. mental health system for decades has faced challenges such as the underdevelopment of community-based supports, high levels of unmet need and inequities in care.

Marijuana use typically drops at the beginning of the year, then climbs in summer and fall
Marijuana use increases throughout the calendar year, with use up 13 percent on average at the end of each year compared to the beginning.

Youth using e-cigarettes three times as likely to become daily cigarette smokers
University of California San Diego Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Sciences researchers report that starting tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, before the age of 18 is a major risk factor for people becoming daily cigarette smokers.

Bacterium produces pharmaceutical all-purpose weapon
For some years, an active substance from the leaves of an ornamental plant has been regarded as a possible forerunner of a new group of potent drugs.

Timing and intensity of oral sex may affect risk of oropharyngeal cancer
Human papillomavirus (HPV) can infect the mouth and throat to cause cancers of the oropharynx.

Study identifies exposure to common food-borne pathogen linked to rare brain cancer
A new study suggests a link between toxoplasma gondii (T.

Oncotarget: HIV +/- patients with lymphoma as a predictor of outcome & tumor proliferation
The Oncotarget author's hypothesis is that ADC values will inversely correlate with Ki-67 expression and that tumors with higher ADC values above the median will have improved OS and PFS

Inspired by kombucha tea, engineers create "living materials"
Engineers at MIT and Imperial College London have developed a new way to generate tough, functional materials using a mix of bacteria and yeast similar to the ''kombucha mother'' used to ferment tea.

Core design strategy for fire-resistant batteries
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) is proud to announce that the research team of Dr.

COVID-19 pandemic indirectly disrupted heart disease care
Deaths from ischemic heart disease and hypertensive diseases in the United States increased during the COVID-19 pandemic over the prior year, while globally, COVID-19 was associated with significant disruptions in cardiovascular disease testing.

Asian water towers on tighter budget despite a warmer and wetter climate
Asian Water Towers will have to struggle to quench the thirst of downstream communities despite more river runoff brought on by a warmer climate, according to a recent study led by the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

New climate change study: Number of people suffering extreme droughts will double
Michigan State University is leading a global research effort to offer the first worldwide view of how climate change could affect water availability and drought severity in the decades to come.

Landmark human study is first to reveal strong links between gut microbes, diet and health
The largest and most detailed study of its kind uncovered strong links between a person's diet, the microbes in their gut (microbiome) and their health.

Unveiling the double origin of cosmic dust in the distant Universe
Two billion years after the Big Bang, the Universe was still very young.

Big differences in how coral reef fish larvae are dispersed
How the larvae of colorful clownfish that live among coral reefs in the Philippines are dispersed varies widely, depending on the year and seasons - a Rutgers-led finding that could help scientists improve conservation of species.

Non-Hispanic Black patients are disproportionately left off liver transplant waitlists
A new study of liver transplant centers confirms that non-Hispanic white patients get placed on liver transplant waitlists at disproportionately higher rates than non-Hispanic Black patients.

Rice model offers help for new hips
Rice University engineers design a computational model that will ultimately serve as the engine to predict how long a hip implant could last for a specific patient.

Spikes in cardiovascular deaths shown to be an indirect cost of COVID-19 pandemic
In a new study from BIDMC, researchers analyzed data from the National Center for Health Statistics to compare the rate of cardiovascular-related deaths before and after the onset of the pandemic in the United States, relative to the same periods in the prior year.

One in five brain cancers fueled by overactive mitochondria
A new study has found that up to 20% of aggressive brain cancers are fueled by overactive mitochondria and new drugs in development may be able to starve the cancers.

Use of telehealth jumped as pandemic shutdown began
As the pandemic shutdown occurred, emergency regulations were enacted to promote the use of telehealth.

Researchers develop new one-step process for creating self-assembled metamaterials
A team led by University of Minnesota Twin Cities researchers has discovered a groundbreaking one-step process for creating materials with unique properties, called metamaterials.

Computer scientists: We wouldn't be able to control super intelligent machines
We are fascinated by machines that can control cars, compose symphonies, or defeat people at chess, Go, or Jeopardy!

Imagining a face reactivates face-detecting neurons in humans
Face-sensitive neurons in humans employ distinct activity patterns to encode individual faces; those patterns reactivate when imagining the face, according to research recently published in JNeurosci.

First human culture lasted 20,000 years longer than thought
Homo sapiens emerged in Africa around 300 thousand years ago, where their fossils are found with the earliest cultural and technological expressions of our species.

Research finds increased first-trimester exercise may reduce gestational diabetes risk
Pregnant women who exercise more during the first trimester of pregnancy may have a lower risk of developing gestational diabetes, according to a new study led by Samantha Ehrlich, an assistant professor in the Department of Public Health at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Impacts of climate change on our water and energy systems: it's complicated
Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), UC Berkeley, and UC Santa Barbara have developed a science-based analytic framework to evaluate the complex connections between water and energy, and options for adaptations in response to an evolving climate.

Team creates hybrid chips with processors and memory to run AI on battery-powered devices
Transactions between processors and memory can consume 95 percent of the energy needed to do machine learning and AI, which severely limits battery life.

Clinical trial of antibiotic strategies for uncomplicated acute appendicitis
This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of two antibiotic strategies (oral moxifloxacin versus intravenous ertapenem followed by oral levofloxacin) on hospital discharge without surgery and recurrent appendicitis over one year among adults presenting to the emergency department with uncomplicated acute appendicitis.

Robot displays a glimmer of empathy to a partner robot
Like a longtime couple who can predict each other's every move, a Columbia Engineering robot has learned to predict its partner robot's future actions and goals based on just a few initial video frames.

Simple monitoring could reduce medicine misuse in care homes
Nurse-led monitoring of patients for signs and symptoms associated with documented 'undesirable effects' of medicines has potential to prevent avoidable harm, and optimize prescribing.

Good results for groin hernia operations not performed by doctors in Sierra Leone
In countries with a severe shortage of surgeons it is common for some operations to be done by medical staff with lower formal qualifications.

BAME parliamentary candidates not picked to fight 'winnable seats' in areas with less tolerance towa
Political parties are increasingly likely to avoid selecting ethnic minority candidates for 'winnable' constituencies at General Elections in areas where there are less tolerant attitudes toward diversity, research suggests.

Can a mother's stress impact children's disease development?
A University of Cincinnati researcher finds that stress on an expectant mother could affect her baby's chance of developing disease -- perhaps even over the course of the child's life.

Galaxy mergers could limit star formation
Astronomers have looked nine billion years into the past to find evidence that galaxy mergers in the early universe could shut down star formation and affect galaxy growth.

A CNIO study links severe COVID-19 disease to short telomeres
The data show that telomeres are shorter in patients suffering more severe COVID-19 pathologies.

How the circadian clock regulates liver genes in time and space
EPFL scientists have carried out the first comprehensive study of how genes in the liver perform their metabolic functions in both space and time of day.

UVA-led team expands power grid planning to improve system resilience
Researchers' paper in Nature Energy demonstrates that modernizing power grids and using renewable energy will be cheaper than repairing hurricane damage.

Advances in understanding autism, based on "mosaic" mutations
Two studies in today's Nature Neuroscience, led by researchers at Boston Children's Hospital, Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), and Harvard Medical School (HMS), implicate mosaic mutations arising during embryonic development as a cause of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

This tree snake climbs with a lasso-like motion
Researchers reporting in Current Biology on January 11 have discovered that invasive brown tree snakes living on Guam can get around in a way that had never been seen before.

Study shows meaningful lockdown activity is more satisfying than busyness
With much of the world practicing varying degrees of social distancing and lockdown, researchers have been investigating the key to happiness in isolation.

More management measures lead to healthier fish populations
Fish populations tend to do better in places where rigorous fisheries management practices are used, and the more measures employed, the better for fish populations and food production, according to a new paper published Jan.

More than just a sun tan: Ultraviolet light helps marine animals to tell the time of year
Changes in daylength are a well-established annual timing cue for animal behavior and physiology.

Big data analysis finds cancer's key vulnerabilities
A new analysis of almost 10,000 patients found that tumors could be stratified into 112 subtypes regardless of the cancer's origin.

Early warning system fills in gaps in infectious disease surveillance
Researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health developed an infectious disease early warning system that includes areas lacking health clinics participating in infectious disease surveillance.

Why COVID-19 pneumonia lasts longer, causes more damage than typical pneumonia
COVID pneumonia is significantly different from pneumonia caused by other causes, reports a new study in Nature.

New nanostructured alloy for anode is a big step toward revolutionizing energy storage
Researchers have developed a battery anode based on a new nanostructured alloy that could revolutionize the way energy storage devices are designed and manufactured.

Chloroplasts on the move
How different plants can share their genetic material with each other

Youth with family history of suicide attempts have worse neurocognitive functioning
Children and adolescents with a family history of suicide attempts have lower executive functioning, shorter attention spans, and poorer language reasoning than those without a family history, according to a new study by researchers from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania.

A safer, less expensive and fast charging aqueous battery
Researchers have developed a new battery anode that overcomes the limitations of lithium-ion batteries and offers a stable, high-performance battery using seawater as the electrolyte.

NYUAD scientists uncover the genomic differences of marine and freshwater microalgae
NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Associate Professor of Biology Kourosh Salehi-Ashtiani and NYUAD Senior Research Scientist David Nelson report in a new study that they have successfully cultured and sequenced 107 microalgae species from 11 different phyla indigenous to varied locations and climates to gain insights on genomic differences in saltwater and freshwater microalgae.

Carbon monoxide reduced to valuable liquid fuels
Rice engineers develop a reactor to produce liquid acetic acid directly from carbon monoxide.

Zombie movies prepared you for the pandemic
Tales of post-apocalyptic landscapes in which few survivors emerge into a new and much different world have long been popular tales woven by screenwriters and authors.

Pediatric hospitalizations for COVID-19
Researchers examined pediatric COVID-19 hospitalization trends in 22 states for both severity among this population and spread of the virus.

Researchers use LRZ HPC resources to perform largest-ever supersonic turbulence simulation
A multi-institution collaboration being led by Australian National University Associate Professor Christoph Federrath and Heidelberg University Professor Ralf Klessen has been using HPC resources at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre to study turbulence's influence on galaxy formation.

Canada must dismantle anti-Black racism in medicine
Canada must dismantle anti-Black racism in health care to address its harmful effects on people's health, argue authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.201579

Understanding origins of Arizona's Sunset Crater eruption of 1,000 years ago
ASU School of Earth and Space Exploration scientist Amanda Clarke and her team have been working to solve the mysterious root cause of the Sunset Crater eruption and any lessons learned to better understand the threats similar volcanoes may pose around the world today.

Race in clinician documentation
Medical records for patients admitted to an urban academic medical center were analyzed for race and ethnicity for evidence of racial bias in clinician documentation.

NIH study suggests using cannabis while trying to conceive may reduce pregnancy chances
Women who use marijuana could have a more difficult time conceiving a child than women who do not use marijuana, suggests a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health.

Researchers acquire 3D images with LED room lighting and a smartphone
In The Optical Society (OSA) journal Optics Express, the researchers demonstrate that 3D optical imaging can be performed with a cell phone and LEDs without requiring any complex manual processes to synchronize the camera with the lighting.

University at Buffalo researchers report quantum-limit-approaching chemical sensing chip
University at Buffalo researchers are reporting an advancement of a chemical sensing chip that could lead to handheld devices that detect trace chemicals -- everything from illicit drugs to pollution -- as quickly as a breathalyzer identifies alcohol.

Neuroscientists identify brain circuit that encodes timing of events
MIT neuroscientists shed new light on how the timing of a memory is encoded in the hippocampus, and suggest that time and space are encoded separately.

Scientists reach new milestone in vaccine development for leishmaniasis
Researchers have taken an important step forward in developing a controlled human infection model to test leishmaniasis vaccines.

Measurements of pulsar acceleration reveal Milky Way's dark side
It is well known that the expansion of the universe is accelerating due to a mysterious dark energy.

Study: New insights on the role of the MLL4 gene in Kabuki syndrome
Research suggests that MLL4 controls the production of neurons that secrete growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in a part of the brain called the hypothalamus.

Researchers find nonnative species in Oahu play greater role in seed dispersal
Oahu's ecosystems have been so affected by species extinctions and invasions that most of the seeds dispersed on the island belong to nonnative plants, and most of them are dispersed by nonnative birds.

Potential jurors favor use of artificial intelligence in precision medicine
Physicians who follow artificial intelligence (AI) advice may be considered less liable for medical malpractice than is commonly thought, according to a new study of potential jury candidates in the U.S.

Study finds new evidence of health threat from chemicals in marijuana and tobacco smoke
Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have uncovered new evidence of the potential health risks of chemicals in tobacco and marijuana smoke.

Biomarkers in fathers' sperm linked to offspring autism
Epigenetic biomarkers in human sperm have been identified that can indicate a propensity to father children with autism spectrum disorder.

Landmark study reveals link between gut microbes, diet and illnesses
Diets rich in healthy and plant-based foods encourages the presence of gut microbes that are linked to a lower risk of common illnesses including heart disease, research has found.

Using light to revolutionize artificial intelligence
An international team of researchers, including Professor Roberto Morandotti of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), just introduced a new photonic processor that could revolutionize artificial intelligence, as reported by the prestigious journal Nature.

Post-surgical patch releases non-opioid painkiller directly to the wound
A Duke-led team of scientists has developed a bio-compatible surgical patch that releases non-opioid painkillers directly to the site of a wound for days and then dissolves away.

Uncovering basic mechanisms of intestinal stem cell self-renewal and differentiation
The gut plays a central role in the regulation of the body's metabolism and its dysfunction is associated with a variety of diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, colitis and colorectal cancer that affect millions of people worldwide.

Turbo boosters for the immune system
Immunologist Prof. Dr. Olaf Groß of the Medical Center - University of Freiburg receives a Proof of Concept Grant from the European Research Council (ERC) for his project IMMUNOSTIM.

A potent weapon against lymphomas
MDC researchers have developed a new approach to CAR T-cell therapy.

Laypeople have difficulty estimating severity of blood loss
When an accident occurs, the reactions of bystanders are important.

Nurse involvement promotes discussion of advanced care planning during office visits
Most doctors would agree that advanced care planning (ACP) for patients, especially older adults, is important in providing the best and most appropriate health care over the course of a patient's life.

Rice 'flashes' new 2D materials
Rice University scientists extend their technique to produce graphene in a flash to tailor the properties of 2D dichalcogenides, quickly turning them into metastable metallics for electronic and optical applications.

Levels of stress hormone in saliva of newborn deer fawns may predict mortality
The first-ever study of the levels of the stress hormone cortisol in the saliva of newborn white-tailed deer fawns yielded thought-provoking results that have Penn State researchers suggesting predation is not the only thing in the wild killing fawns.

ALMA captures distant colliding galaxy dying out as it loses the ability to form stars
Galaxies begin to ''die'' when they stop forming stars, but until now astronomers had never clearly glimpsed the start of this process in a far-away galaxy.

Material for future electronics: New method makes graphene nanoribbons easier to produce
Russian researchers have proposed a new method for synthesizing high-quality graphene nanoribbons -- a material with potential for applications in flexible electronics, solar cells, LEDs, lasers, and more.

Breakthrough on diarrhea virus opens up for new vaccines
Researchers at Umeå University in Sweden have for the first time at the atomic level succeeded in mapping what a virus looks like that causes diarrhea and annually kills about 50,000 children in the world.

Pillar-like molecules as biosensors for metabolites
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Communications Chemistry that a molecule known as pillar[6]arene can form a host-guest compound with a cancer-associated metabolite.

Link between driver of ovarian cancer and metabolism opens up new therapeutic strategies
Wistar scientists found mutations that inactivate the ARID1A gene in ovarian cancer increase utilization of the glutamine amino acid making cancer cells dependent on glutamine metabolism.

Mindfulness can improve mental health and wellbeing -- but unlikely to work for everyone
Mindfulness courses can reduce anxiety, depression and stress and increase mental wellbeing within most but not all non-clinical settings, say a team of researchers at the University of Cambridge.

Physician-pharmacist collaboration may increase adherence to opioid addiction treatment
A collaborative approach to treating opioid use disorder that relies heavily on community pharmacists is feasible and may increase adherence and participant satisfaction, according to a pilot study published today in Addiction.

Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B volume 10, issue 12 publishes
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B Volume 10, Issue 12 Publishes The Journal of the Institute of Materia Medica, the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association, Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B (APSB) is a monthly journal, in English, which publishes significant original research articles, rapid communications and high quality reviews of recent advances in all areas of pharmaceutical sciences -- including pharmacology, pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, natural products, pharmacognosy, pharmaceutical analysis and pharmacokinetics.

Discovery pinpoints new therapeutic target for atopic dermatitis
Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have discovered a key mechanism underlying bacterial skin colonisation in atopic dermatitis, which affects millions around the globe.

An augmented immune response explains the adverse course of COVID-19 in patients with hypertension
COVID-19 patients who also suffer from high blood pressure are more likely to fall severely ill with the disease, which also leaves them at greater risk of death.

Instead of pushing students entrepreneurship, they should be helped to make a better decision
According to an international study by two researchers at Pompeu Fabra University and at Abu Dhabi University, entrepreneurship education today does not help students understand what motivates them.

2D compound shows unique versatility
A unique two-dimensional material shows distinct properties on each side, depending on polarization by an external electric field.

Electrically switchable qubit can tune between storage and fast calculation modes
To perform calculations, quantum computers need qubits to act as elementary building blocks that process and store information.

Elusive link between seizures, cell signaling protein ID'd in zebrafish
A team of Virginia Tech scientists led by Yuchin Albert Pan, an associate professor at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC, have identified a new link between seizures and connexin 36 deficiency.

'Swiss Army knife' catalyst can make natural gas burn cleaner
'Swiss Army knife' catalyst can bring the combustion temperature of methane down by about half - from above 1400 degrees Kelvin down to 600 to 700 degrees Kelvin.

Arecibo observatory helps find possible 'first hints' of low-frequency gravitational waves
Data from Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico has been used to help detect the first possible hints of low-frequency disturbances in the curvature of space-time.

Discovery of quantum behavior in insulators suggests possible new particle
A team led by Princeton physicists discovered a surprising quantum phenomenon in an atomically thin insulator made of tungsten ditelluride.

Same difference: predicting divergent paths of genetically identical cells
DALLAS - Jan. 11, 2021 - A set of biomarkers not traditionally associated with cell fate can accurately predict how genetically identical cells behave differently under stress, according to a UT Southwestern study.

TU Graz identifies bacterium that protects rice plants against diseases
With their expertise in microbiome research, the researchers at the Institute of Environmental Biotechnology were able to demonstrate how a specific bacterium inside the seeds of rice plants effectively and in an eco-friendly way inhibits destructive plant pathogens.

Study reveals strong links between gut microbes, diet and metabolic health
The largest and most detailed study of its kind has uncovered strong links between a person's diet, the microbes in their gut (microbiome) and their health.

Laser harmony
Would you like to capture a chemical transformation inside a cell live?

Analytical measurements can predict organic solar cell stability
researchers have developed an analytical measurement ''framework'' which could allow organic solar cell researchers and manufacturers to determine which materials will produce the most stable solar cells prior to manufacture.

Latinx low-income workers hardest hit by SF COVID surge
In September, Unidos En Salud previously conducted one of the first field tests of the BinaxNOW rapid antigen test, manufactured by Abbott.

Research shapes safe dentistry during Covid-19
Leading research at Newcastle University has been used to shape how dentistry can be carried out safely during the Covid-19 pandemic by mitigating the risks of dental aerosols.

Trained medical staff can perform safe, effective hernia surgery
Many low and middle-income countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, don't have enough surgeons to perform vital surgeries, such as groin hernia repairs.

New process more efficiently recycles excess CO2 into fuel, study finds
For years, researchers have worked to repurpose excess atmospheric carbon dioxide into new chemicals, fuels and other products traditionally made from hydrocarbons harvested from fossil fuels.

Oncotarget: PD-1/PD-L1 expression in anal squamous intraepithelial lesions
Dr. Margot Bucau from The Hôpital Bichat-Claude Bernard said, ''Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is the precursor lesion for anal squamous cell carcinomas (ASCC).

Scientists make sustainable polymer from sugars in wood
Scientists from the University of Bath have made a sustainable polymer using the second most abundant sugar in nature, xylose.

Concerning drop in the number of people with mental health problems seeking help revealed
During April 2020, while the UK was in full lockdown, there was a drop of more than a third in the number of people seeking help for mental illness or self-harm according to research involving 14 million people registered at general practices across the four nations of the UK which was published today in The Lancet Public Health.

Are autism drugs on the horizon?
Are Autism Drugs on the Horizon? Hebrew University Identifies Genetic Mutation Associated with Autism, Offering Hope for Effective Therapeutics

Scientists discover bizarre new mode of snake locomotion
Researchers have discovered a new mode of snake locomotion that allows the brown tree snake to ascend much larger smooth cylinders than any previously known behavior.

COVID-19 drug prospects boosted by discovery of short form of coronavirus's 'entry point'
A shadow over the promising inhaled interferon beta COVID-19 therapy has been cleared with the discovery that although it appears to increase levels of ACE2 protein - coronavirus' key entry point into nose and lung cells - it predominantly increases levels of a short version of that protein, which the virus cannot bind to.

SARS-CoV-2 infection demonstrated in a human lung bronchioalveolar tissue model
Researchers in the Netherlands have demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 replicates efficiently in their model resembling the human bronchioalveolar system that is thought to play a critical role in progression of infection towards pneumonia and ARDS.

Motherhood does not drive support for gun control
Moms are not more likely than other women to support gun control efforts.

Researchers engineer novel disease model to identify potential targets for ulcerative colitis drugs
As reported in Nature Communications, researchers from Cleveland Clinic's Lerner Research Institute have developed a novel, patient-derived model of ulcerative colitis, which will help advance studies into new treatments for the chronic inflammatory bowel disease.

Machine learning accelerates discovery of materials for use in industrial processes
Research led by scientists at the University of Toronto and Northwestern University employs machine learning to craft the best building blocks in the assembly of reticular framework materials for use in a targeted application.

'Galaxy-sized' observatory sees potential hints of gravitational waves
Scientists believe that planets like Earth bob in a sea of gravitational waves that spread throughout the universe.

To understand periodontal disease, researchers examine the surprising behavior of T cells
In diseases characterized by bone loss -such as periodontitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoporosis- there is a lot that scientists still don't understand.

Study finds Dense Breast Notification legislation has not met all desired goals
Little previous research has examined the effects of Dense Breast Notifications (DBNs), but a new study suggests the legislatively required notifications have achieved partial success: women living in states in which in DBNs are mandated had higher rates of being informed about personal breast density and of having had breast density discussions with providers, though rates were low overall.

GridTape: An automated electron microscopy platform
Scientists have developed an automated, faster, and more rapid electron microscopy technique, called GridTape, that enables them to label and read the location of every neuron in a tissue sample.

UCLA scientists develop method to more efficiently isolate and identify rare T cells
Scientists from the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have developed a technique that will enable researchers to more efficiently isolate and identify rare T cells that are capable of targeting viruses, cancer and other diseases.

Oncotarget: Targeted lymphodepletion with a CD45-directed antibody radioconjugate
''Here the Oncotarget authors describe the results of preclinical studies with an anti-mouse CD45 antibody 30F11''

Small towns are bigger than we think
Fewer than one percent of the global population live in truly remote hinterlands, sharpening the need for better understanding of how urban forms impact food systems and development opportunities, according to ground-breaking new research by the Food and Agriculture Organization and the University of Twente.

Anthropogenic heat flux increases the frequency of extreme heat events
Scientists of Institute of Atmospheric Phyics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a case study of Beijing, China, analyzing anthropogenic heat data based on energy consumption.

Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B volume 10, issue 11 publishes
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B Volume 10, Issue 11 Publishes Special Issue: Tumor Microenvironment and Drug Delivery Guest Editors: Huile Gao, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China; Zhiqing Pang, Fudan University, Shanghai, China and Wei He, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, China

Cracking the code of a shapeshifting protein
A shapeshifting immune system protein called XCL1 evolved from a single-shape ancestor hundreds of millions of years ago.

Study shows tweaking one layer of atoms on a catalyst's surface can make it work better
When an LNO catalyst with a nickel-rich surface carries out a water-splitting reaction, its surface atoms rearrange from a cubic to a hexagonal pattern and its efficiency doubles.

Study pinpoints hurdles faced by women and minorities in U.S. chemistry departments
Insufficient interactions with academic advisors and peers and financial problems are derailing career aspirations of women and minority groups pursing graduate degrees in the nation's highest-funded chemistry programs, according to a newly published study.

Three-site study highlight effectiveness of FEND nasal calcium rich salts
In a paper published in Molecular Frontiers Journal, researchers from Cambridge, Massachusetts and Bangalore, India study the effectiveness of FEND product to significantly improve airway hygiene by reducing and suppressing respiratory droplets potentially containing airborne pathogens and other contaminants.

Penn Medicine surgeons develop universal patient-reported outcomes tool to improve hernia care
Penn Medicine researchers have successfully developed, tested, and implemented a first-of-its-kind, patient-informed questionnaire tool for ventral hernia repair surgery patients that could be broadly used to improve the way clinicians care for patients and potentially outcomes.

K-State medical director contributes to research behind updated CDC quarantine guidance
Kyle Goerl, the medical director of Kansas State University's Lafene Health Center, is part of a collaborative team that has published recent research on SARS-CoV-2 transmission and quarantine periods.

Towards Exawatt-class lasers
Researchers from Osaka University propose a concept for next-generation ultra-intense lasers, possibly increasing the current record from 10 Petawatts to 500 Petawatts.

Exciting times for efficient heavy-atom-free OLEDs
An international team including researchers from Osaka University has created an OLED material that combines the mechanisms of thermally activated delayed fluorescence and room-temperature phosphorescence.

Progress made on youth drowning in Aust, NZ, Canada - but more work required
Ten years of data from Australia, New Zealand and Canada reveals a drop in drowning deaths among people under 20 - but a large increase in drowning for adolescent females and First Nations peoples.

Singapore and US scientists uncover the structure of Wnt, Wntless proteins
Preventing Wnt from hitching a ride may offer new avenue for novel treatments for cancer and fibrosis.

NTU Singapore develops oral insulin nanoparticles that could be an alternative to jabs
NTU Singapore scientists have developed insulin nanoparticles that may become an alternative to insulin injections for diabetics.

Master of disguise is new genus and species of cylindrical bark beetle
A resemblance to moss, lichens and fungi made for fantastic cover by a new genus and species of cylindrical bark beetle described by an Oregon State University College of Science researcher.

UTSW researchers identify new gene involved in breast cancer growth
DALLAS - Jan. 12, 2021 - A team of UT Southwestern researchers has identified a gene involved in the growth of breast cancer, a finding that could lead to potential new targets for treatment.

Knowledge of cycad branching behavior improves conservation
Research on cycad trees in Colombia, Guam, and the Philippines has illuminated how knowledge of their branching behavior may benefit conservation decisions for the endangered plants.
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