Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

January 12, 2021
Consent forms design influences patient willingness to share personal health information
Patients are sometimes asked to share their personal health information for research purposes.

Low fitness linked to higher psoriasis risk later in life
In a major register-based study, scientists at University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have now demonstrated a connection between inferior physical fitness in young adults and elevated risk of the autoimmune disease psoriasis.

Shortening college athlete COVID quarantine may boost adherence without increasing risk
Catherine O'Neal, MD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine's branch campus in Baton Rouge, is a co-author of a paper reporting that shortening the length of quarantine due to COVID exposure when supported by mid-quarantine testing may increase compliance among college athletes without increasing risk.

New taxonomy of non-skeletal rare disorders with impact on bone
A new paper published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) Skeletal Rare Diseases Working Group provides a first taxonomic classification of selected non-skeletal rare congenital disorders with an impact on bone physiology on the basis of phenotypes.

More than half of COVID-19 health care workers at risk for mental health problems
A new study, led by University of Utah Health scientists, suggests more than half of doctors, nurses, and emergency responders involved in COVID-19 care could be at risk for one or more mental health problems, including acute traumatic stress, depression, anxiety, problematic alcohol use, and insomnia.

Future too warm for baby sharks
As climate change causes the world's oceans to warm, baby sharks are born smaller, exhausted, undernourished and into environments that are already difficult for them to survive in.

Higher live birth rates found after transferring fresh rather than frozen embryos...
Leveraging national data from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART), the Brigham researchers found that, in cycles using freshly retrieved donor eggs, fresh embryo transfers were indeed associated with significantly higher live birth rates compared to frozen embryo transfers.

Healthcare Nutrition Council leads the way on medical food discussions
Medical foods help patients manage their nutritional needs, yet it can be very difficult for patients to have access to them.

Wearable electronics for continuous cardiac, respiratory monitoring
A small and inexpensive sensor, announced in Applied Physics Letters and based on an electrochemical system, could potentially be worn continuously by cardiac patients or others who require constant monitoring.

January/February 2021 Annals of Family Medicine tip sheet
Annals of Family Medicine is a peer-reviewed, indexed research journal that provides a cross-disciplinary forum for new, evidence-based information affecting the primary care disciplines.

Museum scientists: Prepare for next pandemic now by preserving animal specimens in natural history
It's been more than a year since the first cases were identified in China, yet the exact origins of the COVID-19 pandemic remain a mystery.

Comprehensive characterization of vascular structure in plants
With funding from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, two teams of plant researchers and bioinformatics researchers under the leadership of Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) have succeeded for the first time in identifying the functions of the different cell types in the leaf vasculature of plants.

Organizations collaborate to develop international von Willebrand Disease guidelines
The American Society of Hematology (ASH), the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH), National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF), and World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) have developed joint clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis and management of von Willebrand Disease (VWD), the world's most common inherited bleeding disorder.

Killing cancer by unleashing the body's own immune system
The body's immune system is the first line of defense against infections like bacteria, viruses or cancers.

Johns Hopkins scientist develops method to find toxic chemicals in drinking water
Most consumers of drinking water in the United States know that chemicals are used in the treatment processes to ensure the water is safe to drink.

Why independent cultures think alike when it comes to categories: It's not in the brain
A study from the Network Dynamics Group (NDG) at Penn's Annenberg School for Communication conducted an experiment in which people were asked to categorize unfamiliar shapes.

Strategy tested in mice protects against SARS-CoV-2 & coronaviruses that represent human threats
An immunization strategy tested in mice protects against infection from SARS-CoV-2, as well as from potentially emerging animal coronaviruses, researchers say.

Rate of neonatal abstinence syndrome, maternal opioid-related diagnoses in US
Variations and changes in national and state rates of neonatal abstinence syndrome and maternal opioid-related diagnoses were examined in this observational study.

UCF researchers use advanced light to reveal how different biofuels behave
Vehicles have evolved to become more efficient and sophisticated, but their fuel hasn't necessarily evolved along with them.

The changing paradigm of next-generation semiconductor memory development
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) has announced that the research team led by Dr.

New humanized mouse model provides insight into immunotherapy resistance
Wistar scientists have created an advanced humanized immune system mouse model that allows them to examine resistance to immune checkpoint blockade therapies in melanoma.

The earliest supermassive black hole and quasar in the universe
The most distant quasar known has been discovered. The quasar, seen just 670 million years after the Big Bang, is 1000 times more luminous than the Milky Way, and is powered by the earliest known supermassive black hole, which weighs in at more than 1.6 billion times the mass of the Sun.

Tweaking AI software to function like a human brain improves computer's learning ability
Computer-based artificial intelligence can function more like human intelligence when programmed to use a much faster technique for learning new objects, say two neuroscientists who designed such a model that was designed to mirror human visual learning.

Researchers develop laser-based process to 3D print detailed glass objects
Researchers have developed a new laser-based process for 3D printing intricate parts made of glass.

When AI is used to set prices, can inadvertent collusion be a result?
CATONSVILLE, MD, January 12, 2021 - Machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) are perfectly suited to help companies and marketers monitor and set prices based on real-time dynamic pricing.

Fewer patient encounters drive decline in total primary care office visits
Despite seeing gains in insurance coverage for preventive health services under the Affordable Care Act, the US has seen a declining rate of primary care visits over the past fifteen years.

SUTD develops new model of influence maximization
The model will enhance the robustness of networks to adversarial attacks and will benefit both practitioners and organizations.

A bucket of water can reveal climate change impacts on marine life in the Arctic
We know very little about marine life in the Arctic.

Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe for nursing mothers?
The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) does not recommend cessation of breastfeeding for individuals who are vaccinated against COVID-19.

New study reveals how fences hinder migratory wildlife in the West
Wildlife biologists at the University of California, Berkeley, combined GPS location data of tagged mule deer and pronghorn antelope with satellite imagery of Wyoming fences to find out just how often these animals encounter fences, and what happens when they do.

Higher vaccine rates associated with indicative language by provider, more efficient
New research from Boston Medical Center finds that using clear, unambiguous language when recommending HPV vaccination both increases vaccine acceptance and increases conversation efficiency while preserving patient satisfaction.

Protecting lungs from ventilator-induced injury
An unfortunate truth about using mechanical ventilation to save lives is that the pressure can cause further lung damage.

Protection against corona: 82 percent ventilate more frequently
Despite cold temperatures, the population counts on fresh air to avoid contracting the coronavirus.

Record drop in cancer mortality for second straight year due to improved lung cancer treatment
Overall cancer death rates in the United States dropped continuously from 1991 through 2018 for a total decrease of 31%, including a 2.4% decline from 2017 to 2018.

Survey finds Americans may delay medical appointments, emergency care during pandemic
A new national survey by the Orlando Health Heart & Vascular Institute finds many Americans would delay doctor's appointments and even emergency care when COVID-19 rates are high.

Hunters and busybodies: Researchers use Wikipedia to measure different types of curiosity
In the past, research on curiosity has mostly tried to quantify it, rather than to understand the different ways it can be expressed.

Beating the 'billion-dollar bug' is a shared burden
A new study linking land use patterns and pest outbreaks in Bt maize suggests that slowing the resurgence of western corn rootworm may require a larger-scale strategy than previously thought.

Scientists have synthesized an unusual superconducting barium superhydride
A new exotic compound, BaH12, has been discovered by experiment and theory.

High doses of saccharin don't lead to diabetes in healthy adults, study finds
For those trying to live a healthy lifestyle, the choice between sugar and artificial sweeteners such as saccharin can be confusing.

No disassembly required: Non-destructive method to measure carrier lifetime in SiC
To develop high-voltage devices made with silicon carbide (SiC), a common semiconducting material, it is necessary to understand its charge carrier lifetime distribution within thick layers.

Rising health risks mean stronger regulations needed for smokeless tobacco
Researchers at the University of York are calling for more stringent regulatory measures to reduce the health burden of smokeless tobacco, a product often found in UK stores without the proper health warnings and as a result of illicit trading.

UK government must urgently rethink lateral flow test roll out, warn experts
UK government plans to widen the roll out of the Innova lateral flow test without supporting evidence risks serious harm, warn experts in The BMJ today.

New small antibodies show promising effects against COVID-19 infection
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed, in collaboration with researchers in Germany and the US, new small antibodies, also known as nanobodies, which prevent the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus from entering human cells.

Texas A&M research explores how melanoma grows and spreads
The first step in treating cancer is understanding how it starts, grows and spreads throughout the body.

Study identifies immune response biomarkers, novel pathways in four marine mollusc species
A new study involving the University of Maine assessed immune responses in four economically important marine mollusc species -- the blue mussel, soft-shell clam, Eastern oyster, and Atlantic jackknife clam -- and identified new biomarkers relating to changes in protein function involved in novel regulatory mechanisms of important metabolic and immunological pathways.

Monash University leads breakthrough against antibiotic-resistance
New research published today has discovered how to revert antibiotic-resistance in one of the most dangerous superbugs.

Scientists reveal how gut microbes can influence bone strength in mice
Gut microbes passed from female mice to their offspring, or shared between mice that live together, may influence the animals' bone mass, says a new study published today in eLife.

Can sodium-ion batteries replace trusty lithium-ion ones?
Sodium-ion batteries are a potential replacement for lithium batteries, but different anodes are needed for the same level of performance.

No-till practices in vulnerable areas significantly reduce soil erosion
Soil erosion is a major challenge in agricultural production. It affects soil quality and carries nutrient sediments that pollute waterways.

Nanosheet-based electronics could be one drop away
A surprisingly simple method improves 'drop casting' fabrication of tiled nanosheets that could be used in next-generation electronic devices.

How anorexia nervosa alters body awareness
People with anorexia nervosa have a distorted relationship with the dimensions of their body.

New functions of integrin and talin discovered by an international research network
Researchers at Tampere University, Finland, have published new results in collaboration with an international research network that help to understand the biological phenomena mediated by cell membrane integrin receptors and contribute to the development of methods for the treatment of cancer.

Hope for children with rare heart condition: novel stem cell therapy to save the day
In a new study, scientists at Okayama University isolated cardiac stem cells and assessed their potential use as regenerative therapy in young patients with cardiac defects.

Hospitals must help their own COVID long-haulers recover, experts argue
Thousands of frontline health care workers risked their lives to save others during the pandemic.

Researchers find wildfire smoke is more cooling on climate than computer models assume
Many of the most advanced climate models simulate smoke that is darker, or more light absorbing, than what researchers see in observations.

Black and Hispanic Californians face health discrimination; less trusting of clinicians
A recent statewide survey of Californians uncovered that 30% of Black adults and 13% of Hispanic adults felt that they have been judged or treated differently by a health care provider because of their race/ethnicity or language.

Gut microbes may antagonize or assist in anorexia
Anorexia is a debilitating eating disorder, and was long thought to be purely psychological.

FAU develops simplified COVID-19 diagnostic method to ramp up widespread testing
A simplified COVID-19 testing protocol can detect minimal quantities of the SARS-CoV-2 using samples from the nose and throat as well as saliva and may be useful in testing patients with low viral titers such as asymptomatic patients or testing individuals prior to quarantine release.

Master designers: Architects of the brain revealed
In a study published in Cell Reports, researchers at Kanazawa University identify pathways in the brain which enable neurons to assemble into functional units resembling tall columns.

Tapping the brain to boost stroke rehabilitation
Stroke survivors who had ceased to benefit from conventional rehabilitation gained clinically significant arm movement and control by using an external robotic device powered by the patients' own brains.

Reviewing the evidence for cloth mask use among health care workers
A rapid, evidence-based review summarizes the effectiveness of cloth masks in protecting health care clinicians from respiratory viral infections, such as COVID-19.

The three days pregnancy sickness is most likely to start pinpointed
Researchers from the University of Warwick have narrowed the time frame that nausea and vomiting during pregnancy will potentially start to just three days for most women, opening up the possibility for scientists to identify a biological cause for the condition.

Another common cold virus? Modeling SARS-CoV-2's progress through the ages
What is the endgame for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that is causing worldwide devastation?

Scientists study use of abundant enzyme in tumor cells to monitor cancer treatment
After 14 years studying the action of the enzyme LMWPTP in tumor cells, Brazilian researchers conclude that the molecule is associated with chemotherapy resistance and metastasis.

Prevalence of patients receiving dialysis in China may exceed 800,000 by 2025
Study projects that prevalence of patients receiving dialysis in China will increase from 384.4 patients per million (PPM) in 2017 to 629.7 PMP in 2025 with a predicted 874,373 patients receiving dialysis in 2025.

Nanoparticle immunization technology could protect against many strains of coronaviruses
Caltech researchers are studying a new type of immunization that may be able to protect against many variants of viruses.

Treatment for chronic pain must address both physical and social pain
Physical pain and social pain may be more closely related than previously thought.

Researchers speed up analysis of Arctic ice and snow data through AI
Professors at University of Maryland, Baltimore County have developed an artificial intelligence technique to quickly analyze newly collected data based on Arctic ice and snow thickness.

Food insufficiency linked to depression, anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic
A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found a 25% increase in food insufficiency during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Artificial intelligence puts focus on the life of insects
Scientists are combining artificial intelligence and advanced computer technology with biological know how to identify insects with supernatural speed.

Singing a tumor test song
Singing may be the next-generation, noninvasive approach to determining the health of a patient's thyroid.

Formula predicts ideal dose of stem cells to cure HIV
Scientists have determined the optimal conditions following a stem cell transplant that could control HIV without the need of an everyday pill, according to a study published today in eLife.

Scientists identify "immune cop" that detects SARS-CoV-2
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have identified the sensor in human lungs that detects SARS-CoV-2 and signals that it's time to mount an antiviral response.

NYUAD study finds fragmented sleep patterns can predict vulnerability to chronic stress
New research from NYU Abu Dhabi's Laboratory of Neural Systems and Behavior for the first time used an animal model to demonstrate how abnormal sleep architecture can be a predictor of stress vulnerability.

Long-range energy transport in perovskite nanocrystal films
High efficiency solar cells and light-emitting devices are end-goal targets towards a more sustainable world.

New method helps pocket-sized DNA sequencer achieve near-perfect accuracy 
Researchers have found a simple way to eliminate almost all sequencing errors produced by a widely used portable DNA sequencer (Oxford Nanopore Technologies' MinION device).

Fetal-maternal discordance in APOL1 genotype contributes to preeclampsia risk
Fetal APOL1 kidney risk alleles are associated with increased risk for preeclampsia in African Americans and maternal fetal genotype discordance is also associated with this risk.

Mothers, but not fathers, with multiple children report more fragmented sleep
Mothers with multiple children report more fragmented sleep than mothers of a single child, but the number of children in a family doesn't seem to affect the quality of sleep for fathers, according to a study from McGill University.

The odd structure of ORF8: Mapping the coronavirus protein linked to disease severity
A team of biologists who banded together to support COVID-19 science determined the atomic structure of a coronavirus protein thought to help the pathogen evade and dampen response from human immune cells.

Groundwater drives rapid erosion of the Canterbury coastline, New Zealand
Groundwater flow and seepage can form large gullies along coastal cliffs in the matter of days, it has been discovered.

Discovery of a new approach to inhibiting a highly treatment-refractory liver cancer
Blocking placental growth factor (PlGF), a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor family, inhibits the progression of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and enhances the efficacy of chemotherapy in mouse models.

Quasar discovery sets new distance record
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), along with other telescopes, have discovered the most distant quasar yet found.

Enhanced oral uptake of exosomes opens cell therapy alternative
Cell-derived exosomes are effective in treating disease when mixed with the dominant protein in breast milk and given orally, a new Smidt Heart Institute study of laboratory mice shows.

North Carolina simplifies medicaid enrollment, improves coverage for pregnant women
North Carolina did not expand Medicaid eligibility under the ACA, which continued to put many low-income women at risk for losing health care coverage post partum.

New study of Earth's crust shows global growth spurt three billion years ago
Curtin University researchers have used ancient crystals from eroded rocks found in stream sediments in Greenland to successfully test the theory that portions of Earth's ancient crust acted as 'seeds' from which later generations of crust grew.

DNA in water used to uncover genes of invasive fish
In a proof-of-principle study, Cornell researchers describe a new technique in which they analyzed environmental DNA - or eDNA - from water samples in Cayuga Lake to gather nuanced information about the presence of these invasive fish.

New study shows mental health of ICU staff should be immediate priority
New research from King's College London shows nearly half of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) staff are likely to meet the threshold for PTSD, severe anxiety or problem drinking during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Conflict between divorced parents can lead to mental health problems in children
A study from Arizona State University's REACH Institute has found that when children are exposed to conflict between their divorced or separated parents, they experience fear of abandonment.

High levels of clinician burnout identified at leading cardiac centre
More than half the clinicians surveyed at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre reported burnout and high levels of distress according to a series of studies published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal Open (CMAJ-OPEN).

Study finds risk factors linked to COVID-19 mental health impacts for college students
A study of students at seven public universities across the United States has identified risk factors that may place students at higher risk for negative psychological impacts related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Immune system killer cells controlled by circadian rhythms
An exhaustive dataset drawn from mammalian macrophage cells establishes that macrophage activity is controlled by circadian timing, and - with a substantial mismatch between oscillating proteins and mRNA - hints at unexpected calibration of that timing.

Wives bore the brunt of child care during the shutdown
Traditional gendered patterns of child care persisted during the COVID-19 shutdown, with more than a third of couples relying on women to provide most or all of it.

Poor gut health connected to severe COVID-19, new review shows
In a review published this week in mBio, researchers examined emerging evidence suggesting that poor gut health adversely affects COVID-19 prognosis.

Endocrine Society recommends government negotiation and other policies to lower out-of-pocket costs
The Endocrine Society is calling on policymakers to include government negotiation as part of an overall strategy to reduce insulin prices in its updated position statement published today in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Characteristics of severe thunderstorm and lightning activity in the Beijing metropolitan region
Severe thunderstorm is a kind of high-impact weather process producing lightning, heavy precipitation, hails, and wind gust, and still very difficult to be forecasted accurately up to now.

New technology reveals fast and slow twitch muscle fibers respond differently to exercise
Scientists at the University of Copenhagen have performed the most in-depth analysis of fast and slow twitch muscle fibers and the different ways they respond to exercise.

'Bespoke' analysis of DNA packaging sheds light on intricacies of the fundamental process
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues have optimized data analysis for a common method of studying the 3D structure of DNA in single cells of a Drosophila fly.

Most distant quasar discovered sheds light on how black holes grow
A team of astronomers led by the University of Arizona has observed the most distant quasar to date.

NASA missions help investigate an 'Old Faithful' active galaxy
Yellowstone National Park's Old Faithful geyser regularly blasts a jet of boiling water high in the air.

Gene-editing produces tenfold increase in superbug slaying antibiotics
Scientists have used gene-editing advances to achieve a tenfold increase in the production of super-bug targeting formicamycin antibiotics.

New process evaluates patients for elective surgeries following COVID-19
Acknowledging that COVID-19 may be here to stay, Oregon Health & Science University has laid out a series of steps to prepare patients for elective surgery following their illness.

Sustainable transportation: clearing the air on nitrogen doping
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba elucidated the initial reaction pathways on the pyridinic nitrogen atoms at the armchair edges of doped carbon catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells.

Study finds future too warm for baby sharks
A new study conducted at the New England Aquarium finds that as climate change causes the ocean to warm, baby sharks are born smaller, exhausted, undernourished, and into environments that are already difficult for them to survive in.

Rotten egg gas could guard against Alzheimer's disease
Typically characterized as poisonous, corrosive and smelling of rotten eggs, hydrogen sulfide's reputation may soon get a face-lift thanks to Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers.

Spatial distribution of planktonic ciliates in the western Pacific Ocean: Along the transect from Shenzhen (China) to Pohnpei (Micronesia)
Announcing a new publication for Marine Life Science & Technology journal.

SARS-CoV-2 can infect neurons and damage brain tissue, study indicates
Using both mouse and human brain tissue, researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that SARS-CoV-2 can directly infect the central nervous system and have begun to unravel some of the virus's effects on brain cells.

Study finds NRA stakeholders conflicted in wake of shootings
A recent study finds that, in the wake of a mass shooting, National Rifle Association (NRA) employees, donors and volunteers had extremely mixed emotions about the organization - reporting higher levels of both positive and negative feelings about the NRA, as compared to people with no NRA affiliation.

Tissue stiffness likely drives immune responses in many chronic diseases
Stiffness in our tissues causes tension in our cells. Research shows that stiffness impacts the innate immune system by upping its metabolism.

Suicide among individuals with autism spectrum disorder
National register data from Denmark were used to examine if people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have higher rates of suicide attempts and suicide compared to those without ASD and to identify potential risk factors.

Mechanisms in the kidney that control magnesium and calcium levels discovered
The gene KCTD1 directs production of a protein that functions in the kidney to maintain a normal balance of magnesium and calcium in blood.

Climate change reduces the abundance and diversity of wild bees, study finds
Wild bees are more affected by climate change than by disturbances to their habitats, according to a team of researchers led by Penn State.

DiosCURE to develop highly specific single-chain antibodies against SARS-CoV-2
Preclinical studies demonstrated that the identified candidates selectively target two distinct epitopes of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein at once, which largely prevents the emergence of escape mutants.

New promising antibodies against SARS-CoV-2
An international team led by the University of Bonn (Germany) identified and further developed novel antibody fragments against the SARS coronavirus-2.

New treatment allows some people with spinal cord injury to regain hand and arm function
University of Washington researchers helped six Seattle-area people with spinal cord injuries regain some hand and arm mobility.

Soil degradation costs U.S. corn farmers a half-billion dollars every year
One-third of the fertilizer applied to grow corn in the U.S. each year simply compensates for the ongoing loss of soil fertility, leading to more than a half-billion dollars in extra costs to U.S. farmers every year, finds new research from the University of Colorado Boulder.

First-degree relative with kidney disease increases disease risk by three-fold
In a large population-based family study, family history of kidney disease was strongly associated with increased risk of chronic kidney disease.

New study examines medical practice patterns over time
Variations in medical practice can have serious consequences for the quality, equity and cost of one's health care; however, it's unclear whether these disparities can be attributed to individual differences, from one doctor to another or to changes in your doctor's individual practice over time, perhaps in response to shifts in clinical guidelines or advancements in diagnostic technologists.

School testing plans risk spreading covid-19 more widely, warn experts
As schools prepare to re-open to all pupils in February, experts warn that UK government plans for mass testing risks spreading covid-19 more widely.

Turbulent dynamics in the human brain could revolutionize the understanding of its functionality
According to a new study, published on 8 December in Cell Reports, by Gustavo Deco, director of the Center for Brain and Cognition, and Morten L.

Unsure how to help reverse insect declines? Scientists suggest simple ways
Entomologist Akito Kawahara's message is straightforward: We can't live without insects.

iCeMS makes highly conductive antiperovskites with soft anion lattices
A new structural arrangement of atoms shows promise for developing safer batteries made with solid materials.

Making hydrogen energy with the common nickel
POSTECH joint research team develops a nickel-based catalyst system doped with oxophilic transition metal elements.

Like plants do: non-classical photosynthesis by earth's inorganic semiconducting minerals
Although much is known about biological photosynthesis, its evolutionary origin remains a mystery.

How will SARS-CoV-2 severity change in the next decade?
What will the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak look like ten years from now as it passes from pandemic to endemic, maintained at a constant baseline level in populations without being fueled by outside infections?

Disposable helmet retains cough droplets, minimizes transmission to dentists
Dentists and otolaryngologists are at particular risk of infection of COVID-19, since they need direct access to the mouth, nose, and throat of patients.

Enlightening dark ions
Every field has its underlying principles. For economics it's the rational actor; biology has the theory of evolution; modern geology rests on the bedrock of plate tectonics.

Family court decisions distorted by misuse of key research, say experts
Family courts are misunderstanding and misusing research around how children form close relationships with their caregivers, say an international group of experts.

Boomerang performance is on par with internal employees who never left the firm, new paper finds
A new paper contrasts the outcomes for boomerang employees with those of internally promoted employees to help firms determine whether to invest in talent management strategies that include boomerang rehiring or to focus on internal strategies that develop current employees.

Metabolism may play role in recurrent major depression
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine, in collaboration with Dutch scientists, have found that certain metabolites -- small molecules produced by the process of metabolism -- may be predictive indicators for persons at risk for recurrent major depressive disorder.

MicroLED neural probe for neuroscience
Associate Professor Hiroto Sekiguchi and Ph.D. candidate Hiroki Yasunaga at Toyohashi University of Technology have developed a MicroLED neural probe for neuroscience.

Fossils' soft tissues helping to solve puzzle that vexed Darwin
Remarkably well-preserved fossils are helping scientists unravel a mystery about the origins of early animals that puzzled Charles Darwin.

Cats may help increase empathy, decrease anxiety for kids with autism
While there is plenty of existing research emphasizing the benefits of dogs for children with autism, Carlisle's newest study has found cats may help increase empathy while decreasing separation anxiety for children with autism.

Noted experts challenge conventional wisdom within the field of radiology
A special issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR), published by Elsevier, challenges conventional wisdom across the imaging community.

'Old Faithful' cosmic eruption shows black hole ripping at star
You've heard of Old Faithful, the Yellowstone National Park geyser that erupts every hour or two, a geological phenomenon on a nearly predictable schedule.

Hip fracture incidence expected to increase two-to-three fold in some Eurasian countries
A new report on the burden of osteoporosis in the Russian Federation and seven other Eurasian countries warns of increasing fracture rates due to expected demographic changes, and poor access to diagnosis and treatment.

How many tests after vasectomy? Guideline update leads to change in practice
A change in evidence-based guidelines for vasectomy may have led to a reduction in the number of follow-up tests to confirm the procedure was successful, reports a study in Urology Practice®, an Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA).

Study of flowers with two types of anthers solves mystery that baffled Darwin
Most flowering plants depend on pollinators such as bees to transfer pollen from the male anthers of one flower to the female stigma of another flower, enabling fertilization and the production of fruits and seeds.

Twitter croudsourcing found effective for dermatologic diagnoses
New study from researchers at the University of Paris provides support for social media as a potentially useful tool in the doctor's diagnostic toolkit and a way for general practitioners with questions to connect to specialists who may have the answers.

Primary care plays key role in managing COVID-19 in three Asian cities
Despite having some of the densest living spaces and the highest number of international visitors, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Beijing have utilized their respective primary health care systems to keep their COVID-19 cases and deaths relatively low.

CDC report: removing unnecessary medical barriers to contraception
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is committed to removing unnecessary medical barriers to contraception use by people with certain characteristics or medical conditions.

UCI scientists measure local vibrational modes at individual crystalline faults
Employing newly developed electron microscopy techniques, researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions have, for the first time, measured the spectra of phonons - quantum mechanical vibrations in a lattice - at individual crystalline faults, and they discovered the propagation of phonons near the flaws.

Perceptions of police using PPE during the pandemic - SFU study
A Simon Fraser University study on public perceptions of police officers wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) during the current pandemic finds that most PPE renders positive perceptions of police, while some equipment, including full-face respirator masks, may be viewed more negatively.

Scientists discover key enzyme responsible for skin blistering in the elderly
The Granzyme B (GzmB) enzyme, which accumulates in certain tissues as we age, has been identified as a driver of itchy and sometimes life-threatening autoimmune conditions known as pemphigoid diseases (PDs), which cause blistering and skin erosion below the skin's surface.

USTC obtains Pd-Pt tesseracts for oxygen reduction reaction
A team led by Prof. ZENG Jie from Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Prof.

Impact of COVID lockdown on aeromedical retrievals in remote parts of Australia
New data released this week by Australian researchers reveals the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown period on aeromedical retrievals in rural and remote regions.

UCI researchers use deep learning to identify gene regulation at single-cell level
In a Science Advances study, UCI researchers describe how they developed a deep-learning framework to observe gene regulation at the cellular level.
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