Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

January 25, 2021
Continuous monitoring of proteins a game-changer for patients with deteriorating health
A world-first discovery by Australian researchers could become a game-changer for patients at risk of rapid health deterioration, such as heart complications, stroke, sepsis and cancer.

Seasonal respiratory virus activity before, after statewide COVID-19 shelter-in-place order in Northern California
The association of a shelter-in-place order with lower rates of seasonal respiratory viral activity was examined in this study.

RUDN University linguists conducted comprehensive study of how Russian speakers perceive Greek sound
Linguists from RUDN University found out how Russian speakers differentiate between similar consonants of the Greek language and associate them with Russian sounds.

Researchers engineer antibody that acts against multiple SARS-like viruses
Researchers have engineered an antibody that neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 with a potency that 'rivals' current lead SARS-CoV-2 clinical neutralizing antibodies, and that also broadly neutralizes a range of clade 1 sarbecoviruses.

Aging-US: Growth factor beta type 1 and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 transcription complex
''The Aging-US authors report for the first time that in human breast cancer, AML and embryonic cells, HIF-1 and AP-1 upregulate the expression of TGF-β''

A stem cell based cell culture model for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a widespread condition in the Western World.

Identification of Oligo-DNA that promotes skeletal muscle differentiation
Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and is responsible not only for locomotion but for energy metabolism and heat production.

Older minority cancer patients have worse surgery outcomes than similar white patients
Older minority cancer patients with poor social determinants of health are significantly more likely to experience negative surgical outcomes compared to white patients with similar risk factors, according to a new study published by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G.

Mental health is important to overall health, and heart disease prevention and treatment
Depression and negative psychological health conditions are associated with a less healthy heart and body, while optimism and other positive mental health states are associated with a healthier heart and body.

Advanced measurement technology for future semiconductor devices
A team of researchers led by Osaka University investigated beta-gallium oxide (β-Ga2O3), an emerging semiconductor for next-generation power devices, using an advanced method involving terahertz waves -- the technology that could replace conventional yet invasive electrical semiconductor characterizations.

Opportunities to better detect, manage and treat patients with undiagnosed atrial fibrillation
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with a higher risk of complications including ischemic stroke, cognitive decline, heart failure, myocardial infarction and death.

First comprehensive LCA shows reprocessed medical devices cut GHG emissions in half
Hospitals could cut emissions associated with some medical device use in half by opting instead for reprocessed 'single-use' medical devices.

Fine tuning first-responder immune cells may reduce TBI damage
Immediately after a traumatic brain injury and as long as one year later, there are increased levels of immune cells called ILCs in the brain promoting inflammation, which can worsen brain damage, scientists report.

Puzzling six-exoplanet system with rhythmic movement challenges theories of how planets form
Using a combination of telescopes, including the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory (ESO's VLT), astronomers have revealed a system consisting of six exoplanets, five of which are locked in a rare rhythm around their central star.

Protein anchors as a newly discovered key molecule in cancer spread and epilepsy
Certain anchor proteins inhibit a key metabolic driver that plays an important role in cancer and developmental brain disorders.

Women influenced coevolution of dogs and humans
A cross-cultural analysis found several factors may have played a role in building the relationship between humans and dogs, including temperature, hunting and surprisingly - gender.

Princeton team advances new route to chemically recyclable plastics
As the planet's burden of rubber and plastic trash rises unabated, scientists increasingly look to the promise of closed-loop recycling to reduce waste.

Childhood cancer survivors are not more likely to terminate their pregnancies
Study finds they have a reduced likelihood of becoming pregnant, however.

Despite some advances, women still face disparities of the global burden of stroke
Nine manuscripts featuring research from around the world are featured in a special section of the February 2021 issue of the Stroke journal, published online today.

Opertech Bio's pioneering approach to taste testing and measurement published in JPET
Opertech Bio, Inc., today announced the publication of a seminal research article describing the application of its pioneering TāStation® technology to the pharmacological characterization of human taste discrimination.

COVID-19 warnings were on Twitter well before the outbreak of the pandemic
A new study of researchers at IMT School for Advanced Studies Lucca, published in Scientific Reports, has identified tracks of increasing concern about pneumonia cases on posts published on Twitter in seven countries, between the end of 2019 and the beginning of 2020.

Efficient solid-state depolymerization of waste PET
Despite significant methodological and technological advancements in chemical recycling of synthetic polymers, an effective mechanochemical PET degradation has not yet been described in the scientific literature, until now!

Male breast cancer patients face high prevalence of heart disease risk factors
Male breast cancer patients were found to have a high prevalence of cardiovascular conditions, in a small study of this rare patient population presented at the American College of Cardiology's Advancing the Cardiovascular Care of the Oncology Patient Virtual course.

Watching decision making in the brain
A team of neuroscientists and engineers have developed a system that can show the neural process of decision making in real time, including the mental process of flipping between options before expressing a final choice.

Charged up: revolutionizing rechargeable sodium-ion batteries with 'doped' carbon anodes
Rechargeable batteries like lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are seeing a surge in demand as technologies like electric propulsion ships and other vehicles become increasingly popular.

Epilepsy research focused on astrocytes
A significant number of epilepsy patients does not respond to currently available drugs.

Scientists use a novel ink to 3D print 'bone' with living cells
3D printers may one day become a permanent fixture of the operating theatre after UNSW scientists showed they could print bone-like structures containing living cells.

A new mechanism protects against cancer cell migration and neuron hyperexcitability
G3BP proteins inhibit the metabolic driver MTOR - a signaling protein that plays a central role in tumor diseases and developmental disorders of the brain.

Dairy calves benefit from higher-protein starter feed, Illinois study says
Dairy producers know early nutrition for young calves has far-reaching impacts, both for the long-term health and productivity of the animals and for farm profitability.

3-D printed Biomesh minimizes hernia repair complications
A newly-designed 3D-printed Biomesh effectively minimized postsurgical complications of hernia repair in an animal model.

Scientists show impact of human activity on bird species
Scientists have shown where bird species would exist in the absence of human activity under research that could provide a new approach to setting conservation priorities.

Researchers develop promising way to find new cancer drugs
The enzymes in human cells known as histone deacetylases, or HDACs, are targets for a handful of anticancer drugs because of their ability to affect gene expression.

Global ice loss increases at record rate
The rate at which ice is disappearing across the planet is speeding up, according to new research.

Association of smoking with COVID-19 outcomes
The results of this study suggest that cumulative exposure to cigarette smoke is an independent risk factor for hospital admission and death from COVID-19.

Nanomedicine's 'crown' is ready for its close up
An international team of researchers led by Michigan State University's Morteza Mahmoudi has developed a new method to better understand how nanomedicines -- emerging diagnostics and therapies that are very small yet very intricate -- interact with patients' biomolecules.

Litter provides habitat for diverse animal communities in rivers, study finds
In a study of local rivers, experts at the University of Nottingham in the UK have discovered more invertebrates - animals without a backbone, such as insects and snails - living on litter than on rocks.

New advances in the detection of bias in face recognition algorithms
A team from the Computer Vision Center (CVC) and the University of Barcelona has published the results of a study that evaluates the accuracy and bias in gender and skin colour of automatic face recognition algorithms tested with real world data.

Drink and drug risk is lower among optimistic pupils with 'happy' memories, says study
Teenagers with happy childhood memories are likely to drink less, take fewer drugs and enjoy learning, according to research published in the peer-reviewed journal Addiction Research & Theory.

Sport may fast-track numeracy skills for Indigenous children
Greater sports participation among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children is linked with better academic performance, according to new research from the University of South Australia.

New galaxy sheds light on how stars form
Detailed observations of molecular gas in a tidal dwarf galaxy have important implications for our understanding of how stars are formed.

Fighting cancer from a chair
Cisplatin has been used to treat cancer since the 1970s.

Climate change increases coastal blue carbon sequestration
Coastal wetlands are important ecosystems, especially in mitigating climate change.

Oncotarget: Drug-resistant cells grow exponentially in metastatic prostate cancer
The Oncotarget authors show that the drug-resistant, metastasis-causing cells are capable of producing drug-resistant, exponentially growing tumors, responsible for tumor growth as a patient receives different treatments

GEFS: Searching beyond seismology for earthquake precursors
In this special issue, EPJ Special Topics proposes the Global Earthquake Forecasting System (GEFS): the first collaborative initiative between multi-disciplinary researchers devoted to studying a diverse array of non-seismic earthquake precursors.

Missing protein helps small cell lung cancer evade immune defenses
Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells are missing a surface protein that triggers an immune response, allowing them to hide from one of the body's key cancer defenses, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers suggests.

A microscopic look at aneurysm repair
Research from the University of Pittsburgh and the Mayo Clinic, published in Experimental Mechanics, is the first to show that there are two phases of wall restructuring after an aneurysm forms, the first beginning right away to reinforce the weakened points.

Bioorthogonally catalyzed lethality strategy generates targeting drugs within tumor
Selectively killing tumor while not causing damage to normal cells still remains a challenge in cancer chemotherapy.

Oncotarget: Improved therapeutic efficacy of unmodified anti-tumor antibodies
The Oncotarget findings suggest that MEKi induced an increased expression of tumor-associated antigens, which in combination with anti-tumor antibodies, generated a robust adaptive anti-tumor response that was sustained by immune checkpoint inhibition therapy.

How will seafarers fare once automated ships take over? Scientists predict the future
Researchers from the Korea Maritime and Ocean University show that automation in the shipping industry will lead to an overall increase in shore-based jobs.

COVID-19 cases, deaths in US increase with higher income inequality
US counties with higher income inequality faced higher rates of COVID-19 infections and deaths in the first 200 days of the pandemic, according to a new study.

NASA's Roman mission will probe galaxy's core for hot Jupiters, brown dwarfs
NASA's Roman Space Telescope will conduct a microlensing survey to reveal worlds that are similar to the planets in our solar system.

What's in a name? A new class of superconductors
A new theory that could explain how unconventional superconductivity arises in a diverse set of compounds might never have happened if physicists Qimiao Si and Emilian Nica had chosen a different name for their 2017 model of orbital-selective superconductivity.

Finding a way to stop chemotherapy from damaging the heart
There could be an intervention on the horizon to help prevent heart damage caused by the common chemotherapy drug doxorubicin, new research suggests.

Light pollution linked to preterm birth increase
Scientists conducted the first study to examine the fetal health impact of light pollution based on a direct measure of skyglow, an important aspect of light pollution.

New skull of tube-crested dinosaur reveals evolution of bizarre crest
The first new skull discovered in nearly a century from a rare species of the iconic, tube-crested dinosaur Parasaurolophus was announced today in the journal PeerJ.

Nuclear war could trigger big El Niño and decrease seafood
A nuclear war could trigger an unprecedented El Niño-like warming episode in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, slashing algal populations by 40 percent and likely lowering the fish catch, according to a Rutgers-led study.

Dramatic increase in microplastics in seagrass soil since the 1970s
Large-scale production of vegetables and fruit in Spain with intensive plastic consumption in its greenhouse industry is believed to have leaked microplastic contaminants since the 1970s into the surrounding Mediterranean seagrass beds.

White turns into (extreme-)ultraviolet
Researchers from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) have developed a new method to modify the spectral width of extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light.

Integrated disease management saves olive trees from Verticillium wilt
The University of Cordobas's Agronomy Department (abbreviated to DAUCO in Spanish) reduced the occurrence of Verticillium wilt in a commercial olive plantation by applying an Integrated Disease Management strategy.

Study finds shorter radiation regimen safe, effective for men with advanced prostate cancer
UCLA researchers found shortening a traditional 45-day course of radiation to a five-day course delivered in larger doses is safe and as effective as conventional radiation for men with high-risk forms of prostate cancer.

Domino effects and synchrony in seizure initiation
In a brain with a neurological disorder like epilepsy, synchronization between groups of neurons can grow to a dangerous extent when a collection of brain cells begins to emit excess electricity.

Better bundled: new principle for generating X-rays
X-rays are usually difficult to direct and guide. X-ray physicists at the University of Göttingen have developed a new method with which the X-rays can be emitted more precisely in one direction.

Major discovery helps explain coral bleaching
An EPFL scientist has made a major breakthrough in the understanding of coral bleaching -- a process that causes corals to lose their color and eventually leads to their death.

In ED patients with chest and abdominal pain, care delivered by physicians and APPs is si
In patients matched on complexity and acuity presenting to the emergency department with chest pain and abdominal pain, the care delivered by advanced practice providers (APPs) and emergency physicians is largely similar with respect to diagnostic test ordering and admission decisions.

HIV treatment in Ethiopia is a 'socioeconomic challenge'
For those who are diagnosed and have begun treatment for HIV, it is standard practice to regularly monitor viral load in the blood to assess response to treatment.

Mapping mutations that escape antibodies against COVID-19 suggests prior mapping incomplete
A new approach to mapping viral mutations that 'escape' leading clinical antibodies has revealed mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 virus that allow it to evade treatments, including a single amino-acid mutation that fully escapes Regeneron's antibody cocktail.

SARS-CoV-2 reacts to antibodies of virus from 2003 SARS outbreak, new study reveals
A new study demonstrates that antibodies generated by the novel coronavirus react to other strains of coronavirus and vice versa, according to research published today by scientists from Oregon Health & Science University.

Ba7Nb4MoO20-based materials with high oxygen-ion conductivity opening sustainable future
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology , Imperial and High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) Institute of Materials Structure Science, discover new Ba7Nb4MoO20-based materials with high oxygen-ion (oxide-ion O2-) conductivities--''the hexagonal perovskite-related oxides''--and shed light on the underlying mechanisms responsible for their conductivity.

Doctoral student leads paleoclimate study of precipitation and sea ice in Arctic Alaska
PhD candidate Ellie Broadman of Northern Arizona University's School of Earth and Sustainability developed and led a study in Arctic Alaska to investigate sea ice dynamics and their impact on circulation and precipitation patterns in Arctic Alaska on a long-term basis.

To ward off cancer and other diseases we need to change our lifestyle and focus on innovation
The key factor in preventing non-communicable diseases is lifestyle management at the individual level with a focus on such innovations, which can help increase the awareness of risk factors management in society, claim an international team of researchers, among them - scientists from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania in a recent study.

Elusive 19th century Alaskan fort located using radar tech
Researchers from Cornell University and the National Park Service have pinpointed and confirmed the location of the remnants of a wooden fort in Alaska - the Tlingit people's last physical bulwark against Russian colonization forces in 1804 - by using geophysical imaging techniques and ground-penetrating radar.

Microbes fuelled by wind-blown mineral dust melt the Greenland ice sheet
Scientists have identified a key nutrient source used by algae living on melting ice surfaces linked to rising sea levels.

Graphene Flagship study predicts increased market penetration by 2025
Graphene Flagship experts identify key opportunities in graphene commercialisation after a comprehensive three-year analysis of production methods and potential applications.

Microstructured optical fibers find their 3D-printed groove
Advanced laser-printing techniques prove ideal for creating tiny optical communication devices with complex internal structures.

Transformations within reach: Pathways to a sustainable and resilient world
It is clear that COVID-19 has drastically changed our world, but how can we use the lessons learnt to build a more resilient and sustainable future?

The liver processes coconut oil differently than rapeseed oil
Coconut oil has increasingly found its way into German kitchens in recent years, although its alleged health benefits are controversial.

Biomarkers in mother's plasma predict a type of autism in offspring with 100% accuracy
UC Davis MIND Institute researchers used machine learning to crunch 10,000 autoantibody pattern combinations to identify maternal biomarkers associated with a sub-type of autism.

Optimal information about the invisible
Laser beams can be used to precisely measure an object's position or velocity.

Climate change in antiquity: mass emigration due to water scarcity
The absence of monsoon rains at the source of the Nile was the cause of migrations and the demise of entire settlements in the late Roman province of Egypt.

Governments need to set clear rules for vaccinating health care workers against COVID-19
An analysis undertaken by Faculty of Law professors and a physician-researcher from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa feels provincial and territorial governments should set clear rules for vaccinating health care workers against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in public and private settings.

Air pollution linked to higher risk of sight loss from AMD
Air pollution is linked to a heightened risk of progressive and irreversible sight loss, known as age related macular degeneration (AMD), reveals a large long term study led by UCL researchers, published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

Keeping a clean path: Doubling the capacity of solid-state lithium batteries
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tohoku University, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, and Nippon Institute of Technology, demonstrated by experiment that a clean electrolyte/electrode interface is key to realizing high-capacity solid-state lithium batteries.

Oncotarget: Prognostic biomarker for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma
Reduced expression of TBX15 in tumor tissue represents a potential biomarker for predicting poor survival of patients with HCC

Aging-US: Nicotinamide mononucleotide in degenerative model of retinal detachment
'This Aging-US article concludes that NMN administration exerts neuroprotective effects on photoreceptors'

Genetic breakthrough to target care for deadly heart condition
New genetic faults discovered in people with a heart condition that is sometimes inherited in families could transform the diagnosis and treatment of the hidden disease, according to research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and published in Nature Genetics.

Impact of patient-reported symptom information on lumbar spine MRI Interpretation
According to an open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), in lumbar spine MRI, presumptive pain generators diagnosed using symptom information from brief electronic questionnaires showed almost perfect agreement with pain generators diagnosed using symptom information from direct patient interviews.

Dinosaur embryo find helps crack baby tyrannosaur mystery
They are among the largest predators ever to walk the Earth, but experts have discovered that some baby tyrannosaurs were only the size of a Border Collie dog when they took their first steps.

Adagio publishes preclinical data on lead coronaviruses antibody
Adagio Therapeutics Publishes Preclinical Data in Science Demonstrating Best-in-Class Breadth and Potency Against SARS-CoV-2, Including Known Circulating Resistance Variants, and a Range of Pre-Emergent Coronaviruses.

Reactive halogen from domestic coal burning aggravates winter air pollution
During the winter in the North China Plain, scientists found high concentrations of reactive halogen gases (BrCl, HOBr, Cl2) in the atmosphere which was associated with widespread coal burning in rural areas.

Newly discovered subset of brain cells fight inflammation with instructions from the gut
A team led by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, has shown that a specific astrocyte sub-population can do the opposite, instead serving a protective, anti-inflammatory function within the brain based on signals regulated by the bacteria that reside in the gut.

The stark health and well-being impacts of 'cocooning' on older people
Findings of a new study published by researchers from Trinity College Dublin and St James's Hospital outline the health impacts faced by older people while cocooning during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Study reveals a diverse cephalopod fauna in the canary current large marine ecosystem
An extensive review of cephalopod fauna from the Northwest African Atlantic coast was performed by researchers from the University of Vigo (Spain) and the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO).

Less job stress for workers at financially transparent firms
Employees feel significantly less job distress if they work at companies that are open and transparent about the firm's finances, including budgets and profits, a new study found.

With new design, stretchable electronics perform better under strain
Researchers have created stretchable electronics that are less compromised by deformation.

The surprises of color evolution
Nature is full of colour. For flowers, displaying colour is primarily a means to attract pollinators.

The public health employment picture: Are graduates meeting the demands of the workforce?
In a study to gain understanding of the future public health workforce, researchers conducted a large-scale analysis of first employment outcomes of public health graduates and found that 78 percent were employed; only 5 percent were not employed and job seeking.

Novel molecules to combat asthma and covid-related lung diseases discovered
Australian researchers have made the extraordinary discovery of two molecules - one found in a commercially available dietary supplement - that provide profound protection in experimental models of asthma and can also substantially reduce the severity of asthma attacks.

Analysis details racial inequity and corrective strategies in research grant funding
An analysis by Nicholas Gilpin, PhD, Professor of Physiology and Associate Director of the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Center of Excellence at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and Michael Taffe, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California San Diego, summarizes long-standing racial inequities in federal funding for biosciences research from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Survey: barriers, not demographics, affect willingness to pursue veterinary care
When it comes to seeking veterinary care for dogs, barriers to access - including a lack of trust - have more effect on the decision-making process than differences in race, gender or socioeconomic status.

Aging-US: PAM (PIK3/AKT/mTOR) signaling in glia: potential contributions to brain tumors
'The consideration of aberrant PIK3/AKT/mTOR signaling in glia during aging elucidates several therapeutic opportunities for brain tumors'.

Titanium oxide nanotubes facilitate low-cost laser-assisted photoporation
Toyohashi University of Technology developed a nanosecond pulse laser-assisted photoporation method using titanium-oxide nanotubes (TNTs) for highly efficient and low-cost intracellular delivery.

Street trees close to the home may reduce the risk of depression
Daily contact with trees in the street may reduce the need for antidepressants.

First observation of the early link between proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease
Study conducted by researchers from the GIGA CRC In vivo Imaging laboratory at ULiège demonstrates, for the first time in humans, how the first deposits of tau proteins in the brainstem are associated with neurophysiological processes specific to the early stages of Alzheimer's disease development.

New IU study finds most high-school age youth are willing to wear masks
A new study from Indiana University researchers finds that most high-school age youth are willing to wear masks to help prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus.

Musicians have more connected brains than non-musicians
The brains of musicians have stronger structural and functional connections compared to those of non-musicians, regardless of innate pitch ability, according to new research from JNeurosci.

Dietary adherence and the fight against obesity
While eating less and moving more are the basics of weight control and obesity treatment, finding ways to help people adhere to a weight-loss regimen is more complicated.

Boosting the efficiency of carbon capture and conversion systems
Researchers at MIT have developed a method to boost the performance of carbon capture systems that use catalytic surfaces to enhance the rates of carbon-sequestering electrochemical reactions.

Immune cells found in the brain are behind the depression experienced in inflammation
Special immune cells found in the brain, microglia, play a key role in the processes that make you feel uneasy and depressed in correlation with inflammation.

Post-surgery death rates higher among cancer patients in lower-income countries
Research by an international team of medical experts has found cancer patients could be up to four times more likely to die following cancer surgery in low to lower-middle income countries than in high-income countries.

Biologists unravel full sequence of DNA repair mechanism
Researchers led by the University of Iowa have observed the entire sequence in break-induced replication, a method by which organisms from viruses to humans repair breaks in DNA that cannot be fixed otherwise but can introduce or cause genomic rearrangements and mutations contributing to cancer development.

Photocatalytic reaction in the shadow
Photoelectrochemical water splitting is a promising technology to convert solar energy into value-added fuels.

Preventing loneliness in children of depressed mothers may reduce adolescent suicidality
Children of mothers experiencing depressive symptoms are more at risk, as adolescents, of experiencing suicidal thoughts and attempting suicide.

Most patients find teledermatology appointments suitable alternative to office visits
Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) surveyed dermatology patients at the GW Medical Faculty Associates to evaluate patient satisfaction with teledermatology appointments.

Special Issue, Volume 10 of Inter Faculty - Resonance
The Special Issue, Volume 10, of Inter Faculty takes up the theme of resonance in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic and its ensuing societal shifts.

Competition among human females likely contributed to concealed ovulation
Humans are among the few species that lack overt physical indicators of female fertility.

Adding or subtracting single quanta of sound
Researchers perform experiments that can add or subtract a single quantum of sound--with surprising results when applied to noisy sound fields.

Wetter weather affects composition, numbers of tiny estuarial phytoplankton
Extreme weather events, such as hurricanes and increased precipitation, affect both the amount and the composition of picophytoplankton in the Neuse River Estuary.

ISIS and the Taliban use different strategies to appeal to women in English-language magazines
ISIS, Al Qaeda, and the Taliban use their English-language magazines to encourage women to support jihad in different ways, according to new research.

Turbulence model could enhance rotorcraft, munitions performance
Design of Army aerial vehicles and weapon systems relies on the ability to predict aerodynamic behavior, often aided by advanced computer simulations of the flow of air over the body.

Study: Negative mental health effects of pandemic lockdowns spike, then fade
Social distancing policies correlated with immediate increases in interest in information about 'isolation' and 'worry' - but those effects tapered off two to four weeks after their respective peaks, says new research co-written by Dolores Albarracín, a professor of psychology and of business administration at Illinois, and Bita Fayaz Farkhad (pictured), an economist and a postdoctoral researcher in psychology at Illinois.

Stimulating brain pathways shows origins of human language and memory
Scientists have identified that the evolutionary development of human and primate brains may have been similar for communication and memory.

In preclinical models, antiviral better inhibits COVID-19 than Remdesivir; further studies warranted
Working in preclinical models, researchers report that plitidepsin, a drug with limited clinical approval for the treatment of multiple myeloma, is more potent against SARS-CoV-2 than remdesivir, an antiviral that received FDA emergency use authorization for the treatment of COVID-19 in 2020.

Borderline personality disorder: Don't ignore it
Borderline Personality Disorder is treatable. New University of Houston research is the first to show that adolescent borderline pathology follows a similar downward course after discharge from inpatient treatment previously demonstrated for adults.

When -- not what -- obese mice ate reduced breast cancer risk
University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center researchers report that intermittent fasting reduced breast cancer risk in obese mice.

Ideal surgical results less likely if cancer patients live vulnerable communities
A new study finds that older cancer patients are less likely to have optimal results following their cancer operation if they live in an area highly affected by social challenges, especially if they are racial-ethnic minorities.

Nearly one in four families hesitant to take their child to ER during COVID-19 pandemic
During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly one in four families responded that they would be unlikely to bring their child to the Emergency Department if they had an emergency condition, according to a survey from Ann & Robert H.

How complex oscillations in a quantum system simplify with time
With a clever experiment, physicists have shown that in a one-dimensional quantum system, the initially complex distribution of vibrations or phonons can change over time into a simple Gaussian bell curve.

Increasing ocean temperature threatens Greenland's ice sheet
Scientists at the University of California, Irvine and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory have for the first time quantified how warming coastal waters are impacting individual glaciers in Greenland's fjords.

Simulating 800,000 years of California earthquake history to pinpoint risks
A new study presents a prototype Rate-State earthquake simulator that simulates hundreds of thousands of years of seismic history in California.

CHEOPS finds unique planetary system
The CHEOPS space telescope detects six planets orbiting the star TOI-178.

How fast could SARS-CoV-2 be detected?
Researchers from Peking University developed an accurate, high-speed (?10 min for RNA analysis and ?5 min for immunoassay), portable bifunctional electrical detector based on graphene field-effect transistors for SARS-CoV-2 through either nucleic acid hybridization or antigen-antibody protein interaction.

Anti-freeze for cell membranes
Mosses and flowering plants took different genetic routes to evolve a similar defense mechanism.

For veterans after suicide attempts, gender affects recovery needs
What care do veterans need when recovering after suicide attempts?

When galaxies collide
It was previously thought that collisions between galaxies would necessarily add to the activity of the massive black holes at their centers.

To find the right network model, compare all possible histories
Scientists rarely have the historical data they need to see exactly how nodes in a network became connected.

Energy spent avoiding humans associated with smaller home ranges for male pumas
New research shows that fear of humans causes mountain lions to increase their energy expenditures as they move through the landscape, and this can ultimately limit the size of the home ranges they're able to maintain.

How does incident solar radiation affect urban canyons?
Toyohashi University of Technology proposed a numerical bead model to predict the upward-to-downward reflection ratio of glass bead retro-reflective (RR) material purposed for urban heat island (UHI) mitigation and reducing energy consumption.

Cholesterol starvation kills lymphoma cells
Scientists have developed a novel therapy to trick cancer cells into gobbling up what they think is their favorite food - cholesterol -- which actually triggers their destruction.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.