Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

January 27, 2021
New study: Which beverages burst with umami potential?
In a new and first of its kind study, University of Copenhagen researchers study fermented beverages to find the one with the most umami flavour.

Secrets of traumatic stress hidden in the brain are exposed
Study explores lateralization changes in resting state brain network functional connectivity.

Up-trending farming and landscape disruptions threaten Paris climate agreement goals
UC Irvine Earth system science researchers conducted an analysis of greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture and land use since 1961, finding some opportunities for mitigation as well as areas where curtailment will require sacrifices.

Heart disease #1 cause of death rank likely to be impacted by COVID-19 for years to come
Heart disease remains the #1 cause of death worldwide in the latest annual Statistical Update from the American Heart Association Experts say the effects of COVID-19 are likely to influence cardiovascular health and mortality rates for many years, directly and as a result of increased lifestyle-related risks during and after the pandemic.

Trying to beat a coke habit with cannabis? Not so fast !
Taking cannabidiol, a chemical in the cannabis sativa plant, isn't an effective way to reduce your dependence on cocaine, researchers at the CHUM Research Centre find.

Key switchgrass genes identified, which could mean better biofuels ahead
Biologists believe they are one step closer to a long-held goal of making a cheap, widely available plant a source for energy and fuel, meaning one of the next big weapons in the battle against climate change may be able to trace its roots to the side of a Texas highway.

Adults with cognitive disabilities more than twice as likely to use e-cigarettes
In the first national study to assess use of e-cigarettes among adults with disabilities, George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services researchers found that e-cigarette use was more than twice as likely among adults with a cognitive disability (12.0%), an independent living disability (11.0%), or two or more disabilities (9.2%), compared to adults without disabilities (4.8%).

How blood stem cells maintain their lifelong potential for self-renewal
A characteristic feature of all stem cells is their ability to self-renew.

Study shows racial disparities in elementary school disciplinary actions
Even after accounting for differences in income, education, caregiver support, special education services and parental reports of misbehavior and family conflict, elementary school-age Black children are 3.5 times more likely to be suspended or placed in detention than their white peers, a new study finds.

Why people overuse antibiotics
The overuse of antibiotics occurs due to the mistaken widespread belief that they are beneficial for a broad array of conditions and because many physicians are willing to prescribe antibiotics if patients ask for the medication, according to a Rutgers study.

A new study reveals an "Achilles heel" of cancer cells
? For the first time, a study shows how an abnormal number of chromosomes (aneuploidy) - a unique characteristic of cancer cells that researchers have known about for decades - can become a vulnerability of these cells.

Even machines need their greens
Image that products could be strengthened with the same living materials that provide nutrients to strengthen trees.

Getting to net zero -- and even net negative -- is surprisingly feasible, and affordable
Reaching zero net emissions of carbon dioxide from energy and industry by 2050 can be accomplished by rebuilding U.S. energy infrastructure to run primarily on renewable energy, at a net cost of about $1 per person per day, according to new research published by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the University of San Francisco (USF), and the consulting firm Evolved Energy Research.

History of the Champagne vineyards revealed
Although the reputation of Champagne is well established, the history of Champagne wines and vineyards is poorly documented.

Schizophrenia second only to age as greatest risk factor for COVID-19 death
People with schizophrenia, a mental disorder that affects mood and perception of reality, are almost three times more likely to die from the coronavirus than those without the psychiatric illness, a new study shows.

'Virtual anatomy' imaging yields new insight into ancient platypus fish
The inner ear of a 400 million-year-old 'platypus fish' has yielded new insights into early vertebrate evolution, suggesting this ancient creature may be more closely related to modern-day sharks and bony fish than previously thought.

A mild way to upcycle plastics used in bottles into fuel and other high-value products
Plastic is ubiquitous in people's lives. Yet, when plastic-containing items have fulfilled their missions, only a small amount is recycled into new products, which are often of lower quality compared to the original material.

Ancient indigenous New Mexican community knew how to sustainably coexist with wildfire
Wildfires are the enemy when they threaten homes in California and elsewhere.

Healthy lifespan analysis using nematodes
Researchers have developed an automated measurement system to assess healthy lifespan using nematodes.

Optical scanner design for adaptive driving beam systems can lead to safer night driving
In a recent study published in the Journal of Optical Microsystems, researchers from Japan have come up with an alternative to conventional adaptive driving beam systems: a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) optical scanner that relies on the piezoelectric effect of electrically induced mechanical vibrations.

Exercise-based cardiac rehab added to stroke recovery improved strength, cardiac endurance
In a small study, stroke survivors who completed a three-month cardiac rehabilitation program focused on aerobic exercise significantly improved their physical endurance and strength.

Pace of prehistoric human innovation could be revealed by 'linguistic thermometer'
A physics professor has joined forces with language experts to build a 'linguistic thermometer' that can record the temperature of 'hot' or 'cold' (ie fast or slow) developments in modern linguistic features to create a computer-based model that can provide a better understanding of the development in human language and innovation stretching back to pre-history.

World's largest opinion survey on climate change: Majority call for wide-ranging action
An innovative UNDP global survey conducted in collaboration with Oxford University experts -- the largest-ever opinion survey on climate change (1.2 million people in 50 countries) -- finds 64% (+/- 2%) deem climate an 'emergency.' Worldwide, most people clearly want a strong and wide-ranging policy response, and 4 of 18 policy options received majority support.

Ancient proteins help track early milk drinking in Africa
Got milk? The 1990s ad campaign highlighted the importance of milk for health and wellbeing, but when did we start drinking the milk of other animals?

Top 10 insights in climate science in 2020 selected by 57 leading global researchers
In a report presented today to Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), report authors outlined some of 2020's most important findings within the field of climate science, ranging from improved models that reveal the need for aggressive emission cuts in order to meet the Paris Agreement to the growing use of human rights litigation to catalyze climate action.

COVID-19 increases mortality rate among pregnant women
The study followed 240 pregnant women between March and June 2020 and found that the COVID-19 mortality rate in the pregnant women was significantly higher when compared to the COVID-19 mortality rate in similarly aged individuals within Washington state.

Confirmed improvement in first responders' brain health after shortened training protocol
People believe that they can't change their brains, or their brain health will decline as they age.

Ultra-absorptive nanofiber swabs could improve SARS-CoV-2 test sensitivity
Rapid, sensitive diagnosis of COVID-19 is essential for early treatment, contact tracing and reducing viral spread.

Toho university scientists find new mechanism to keep cell death pathway suppressed
A research group led by Prof. Hiroyasu Nakano at the Department of Biochemistry, Toho University Faculty of Medicine, identified Mind bomb-2 (MIB2) as an enzyme that ubiquitinates and modifies the protein cFLIP, which plays a central role in suppressing cell death.

Scientists identify individual neurons responsible for complex social reasoning in humans
Until now, how neurons represent another individual's belief and thoughts was unknown.

Antibody highs and lows in survivors of Ebola
A high proportion of survivors of Ebola experienced a resurgence in antibody levels nearly a year after recovery, a new University of Liverpool study has found.

Findings may help close door on COVID-19
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston have discovered what may be the Achilles' heel of the coronavirus, a finding that may help close the door on COVID-19 and possibly head off future pandemics.

Researchers identify genetic dependencies in tumors that have undergone whole genome doubling
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified proteins that are essential for the viability of whole genome doubled tumor cells, yet non-essential to normal cells that comprise the majority of human tissue.

Size of helium nucleus measured more precisely than ever before
In experiments at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, an international research collaboration has measured the radius of the atomic nucleus of helium five times more precisely than ever before.

New Tel Aviv University study reveals 'Achilles' heel' of cancer cells
A new study from Tel Aviv University (TAU) shows, for the first time, how an abnormal number of chromosomes (aneuploidy) -- a unique characteristic of cancer cells that researchers have known about for decades -- could become a weak point for these cells.

Making wheat and peanuts less allergenic
Research uses plant breeding and biotechnology to remove proteins associated with food allergies.

A little soap simplifies making 2D nanoflakes
The right combination of surfactant, water and processing can maximize the quality of 2D hexagonal boron nitride for such products as antibacterial films.

Pain patients who take opioids can't get in the door at over half of primary care clinics
People who take opioid medications for chronic pain may have a hard time finding a new primary care clinic that will take them as a patient if they need one, according to a new 'secret shopper' study of hundreds of clinics across the country.

New report charts path toward superior earthquake recovery
A committee of experts, formed by NIST and FEMA under the direction of Congress, has urged officials at all levels of government to support research and policies that could help get the buildings and services society depends on up and running quickly after an earthquake.

Geological phenomenon widening the Atlantic Ocean
An upsurge of matter from deep beneath the Earth's crust could be pushing the continents of North and South America further apart from Europe and Africa, new research has found.

A metalens for virtual and augmented reality
Harvard researchers have developed a two-millimeter achromatic metalenses that can focus RGB (red, blue, green) colors without aberrations and developed a miniaturized display for virtual and augmented reality applications.

Genome-editing tool TALEN outperforms CRISPR-Cas9 in tightly packed DNA
Researchers used single-molecule imaging to compare the genome-editing tools CRISPR-Cas9 and TALEN.

Carbon-chomping soil bacteria may pose hidden climate risk
Much of the earth's carbon is trapped in soil, and scientists have assumed that potential climate-warming compounds would safely stay there for centuries.

Ions in molten salts can go 'against the flow'
In a new article published in the scientific journal Communications Chemistry, a research group at Uppsala University show, using computer simulations, that ions do not always behave as expected.

New benchmark set to deliver optimal osteoporosis care throughout Asia Pacific
The Asia Pacific Consortium on Osteoporosis (APCO) has today launched the first pan-Asia Pacific clinical practice standards for the screening, diagnosis, and management of osteoporosis, targeting a broad range of high-risk groups.

Controlling pain after surgery doesn't have to mean opioids, study shows
As surgeons balance the need to control their patients' post-surgery pain with the risk that a routine operation could become the gateway to long-term opioid use or addiction, a new study shows the power of an approach that takes a middle way.

Melatonin produced in the lungs prevents infection by novel coronavirus
The hormone acts as a barrier against SARS-CoV-2, blocking the expression of genes that encode proteins in cells serving as viral entry points, according to a study by researchers at the University of São Paulo.

Going Organic: uOttawa team realizing the limitless possibilities of wearable electronics
uOttawa Professor Benoît Lessard and his team are developing carbon-based technologies which could lead to improved flexible phone displays, make robotic skin more sensitive and allow for wearable electronics that could monitor the physical health of athletes in real-time.

First ever 'pioneer' factor found in plants enables cells to change their fate
To start the process of unpacking tightly bundled genetic material, plants depend on the LEAFY pioneer protein, according to work led by University of Pennsylvania biologist Doris Wagner.

New malaria mosquito is emerging in African cities
Larvae of a new malaria mosquito species are abundantly present in water containers in cities in Ethiopia.

Children can bypass age verification procedures in popular social media apps
Children of all ages can completely bypass age verification measures to sign-up to the world's most popular social media apps including Snapchat, Instagram, TikTok, Facebook, WhatsApp, Messenger, Skype and Discord by simply lying about their age, researchers at Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software have found.

New study identifies bird species that could spread ticks and Lyme disease
A new study published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography used machine learning to identify bird species with the potential to transmit the Lyme disease bacterium (Borrelia burgdorferi) to feeding ticks.

New study points to better diagnostics for cancer
A new University of California, Irvine-led study finds a new method for identifying biomarkers may aid in early cancer diagnosis.

Study introduces mRNA-LNP as a safe therapeutic intervention for liver regeneration
When severely or chronically injured, the liver loses its ability to regenerate.

Culture shapes willingness to share personal data to reduce COVID-19 spread
Culture, civic-mindedness and privacy concerns influence how willing people are to share personal location information to help stem the transmission of COVID-19 in their communities, a new study finds.

Diving into devonian seas: Ancient marine faunas unlock secrets of warming oceans
Syracuse University paleontologists use ancient marine faunas to test long-term changes in our warming oceans.

Mammogram-based breast cancer risk model could lead to better screening guidelines
A new machine learning algorithm based on mammograms can estimate the risk of breast cancer in women more accurately than current risk models, according to a study from Adam Yala and colleagues.

Harpy eagles could be under greater threat than previously thought
New research led by the University of Plymouth (UK) suggests estimates of the species' current distribution are potentially overestimating range size.

A vacuum-ultraviolet laser with submicrometer spot for spatially resolved photoemission spectroscopy
If vacuum ultraviolet lasers can be focused into a small beam spot, it will allow investigation of mesoscopic materials and structures and enable the manufacture of nano-objects with excellent precision.

Conditions among patients with COVID-19 four months after hospital discharge
This study among patients in Italy suggests that despite virological recovery, a sizable proportion of patients with COVID-19 experienced respiratory, functional or psychological conditions months after hospital discharge.

New findings on devonian 'platypus fish' cast light on evolution of modern jawed vertebrates
New findings on the brain and inner ear cavity of a 400-million-year-old platypus-like fish cast light on the evolution of modern jawed vertebrates, according to a study led by Dr.

Forests with diverse tree sizes and small clearings hinder wildland fire growth
A new 3D analysis shows that wildland fires flare up in forests populated by similar-sized trees or checkerboarded by large clearings and slow down where trees are more varied.

Working memory can help tailor educational development
Imagine a 7-year-old and a college student both take a break from their virtual classes to get a drink of water.

Women's menstrual cycles temporarily synchronize with Moon cycles
An analysis of long-term menstrual cycle records kept by 22 women for up to 32 years shows that women with cycles lasting longer than 27 days intermittently synchronized with cycles that affect the intensity of moonlight and the moon's gravitational pull.

How climate caprices can trigger plants
Climate change may challenge organismal responses through not only extreme cues.

Research finds blood pressure can be controlled without drugs after spinal cord injury
Canadian and Swiss researchers have created the first platform to understand the mechanisms underlying blood pressure instability after spinal cord injury.

T cells can mount attacks against many SARS-CoV-2 targets--even on new virus variant
A new study led by scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) suggests that T cells try to fight SARS-CoV-2 by targeting a broad range of sites on the virus--beyond the key sites on the virus's spike protein.

Study reveals precarious employment on the rise long before COVID-19
A study led by a University of Illinois Chicago researcher uses a new approach to measure precarious, or low-quality, employment in the United States.

Hypnotic suggestions can make a complex task easy by helping vision fill in the blanks
New research demonstrates that hypnosis--the process of focusing a person's attention on a specific task or sensation--can turn a normally difficult visual task into a far easier one by helping individuals mentally ''fill in the gaps'' of missing visual cues.

Legal cannabis stores linked to fewer opioid deaths in the United States
Access to legal cannabis stores is associated with a reduction in opioid related deaths in the United States, particularly those linked to synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

Detecting trace amounts of multiple classes of antibiotics in foods
Widespread use of antibiotics in human healthcare and livestock husbandry has led to trace amounts of the drugs ending up in food products.

Vaccine delivered via skin could help in fight against respiratory diseases
Brigham's Thomas Kupper, MD, and co-authors present results from preclinical studies suggesting skin scarification may help generate lung T cells and provide protection against infectious diseases, with implications for prevention of COVID-19.

Scientists jump-start two people's brains after coma
In 2016, a team led by UCLA's Martin Monti reported that a 25-year-old man recovering from a coma had made remarkable progress following a treatment to jump-start his brain using ultrasound.

Lung-MAP translational discoveries shared at 2020 World Conference on Lung Cancer
Investigators leading the Lung Cancer Master Protocol, or Lung-MAP trial, will present findings from three translational medicine studies at the 2020 World Conference on Lung Cancer, to be held online January 28-31, 2021.

In tune with the moon
Does the moon affect women's menstrual cycles? This question has been controversial for a long time.

In a tight spot
A newly discovered circuit helps fish to prioritize.

Detecting ADHD with near perfect accuracy
A new study led by a University at Buffalo researcher has identified how specific communication among different brain regions, known as brain connectivity, can serve as a biomarker for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

More than just CO2: It's time to tackle short-lived climate-forcing pollutants
Climate change mitigation is about more than just CO2. So-called 'short-lived climate-forcing pollutants' such as soot, methane, and tropospheric ozone all have harmful effects.

Researchers use car collisions with deer to study mysterious animal-population phenomena
By parsing data on weather, deer populations and deer-vehicle collisions in Wisconsin, investigators at the University of Kansas show spatial synchrony could be driving population cycles, rather than the reverse.

Support for self isolation must be a top priority, say experts
Helping people to self isolate after testing positive for covid-19 must now be a top priority for the UK government, argue experts in The BMJ today.

Important climate change mystery solved by scientists
Scientists have resolved a key climate change mystery, showing that the annual global temperature today is the warmest of the past 10,000 years - contrary to recent research, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Nature.

Scientists discover a new promising target for diabetes treatment
Researchers have discovered a novel and druggable insulin inhibitory receptor, named inceptor.

Engineers share model for ventilating two patients with one ventilator
As Covid-19 continues to put pressure on healthcare providers around the world, engineers at the University of Bath have published a mathematical model that could help clinicians to safely allow two people to share a single ventilator.

Global analysis suggests COVID-19 is seasonal
With cities around the globe locking down yet again amid soaring COVID-19 numbers, could seasonality be partially to blame?

Cell death shines a light on the origins of complex life
Organelles continue to thrive after the cells within which they exist die, a team of University of Bristol scientists have found, overturning previous assumptions that organelles decay too quickly to be fossilised.

'You say tomato, I say genomics': Genome sequences for two wild tomato ancestors
A research team led by University of Tsukuba has produced genome sequences for two wild species of tomato from South America, ancestors of the cultivated tomato.

When simpler is harder
Some languages require less neural activity than others. But these are not necessarily the ones we would imagine.

Genetic changes in tumours could help predict if patients will respond to immunotherapy
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute, the UCL Cancer Institute, and the Cancer Research UK Lung Cancer Centre of Excellence have identified genetic changes in tumours which could be used to predict if immunotherapy drugs would be effective in individual patients.

VCU technology could upend DNA sequencing for diagnosing certain DNA mutations
Doctors are increasingly using genetic signatures to diagnose diseases and determine the best course of care, but using DNA sequencing and other techniques to detect genomic rearrangements remains costly or limited in capabilities.

Parkinson's disease risk and severity is tied to a channel in cells' 'recycling centers
Genetic variations associated with both increases and reductions in risk of the neurodegenerative disease alter the action of ion channels within cellular organelles called lysosomes, a new Penn study finds.

Juicing technique could influence healthfulness of fresh-squeezed juice
With the New Year, many people are making resolutions to eat healthier, by eating more vegetables, for example.

Scientists develop perovskite solar modules with greater size, power and stability
Researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have created perovskite solar modules with improved stability and efficiency by using a new fabrication technique that reduced defects.

Offer COVID-19 vaccines to pregnant or breastfeeding people
People who are pregnant, breastfeeding or trying to conceive should be offered the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine based on ethical grounds, argue authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal)

How heavy is dark matter? Scientists radically narrow the potential mass range for the first time
Scientists have calculated the mass range for Dark Matter - and it's tighter than the science world thought.

How does the immune system keep tabs on the brain?
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that immune cells stationed in the meninges, the tissue that covers the brain and spinal cord, monitor the brain and initiate an immune response if they detect a problem.

Fields of breeders' dreams: A team effort toward targeted crop improvements
In Nature, a team led by researchers at the University of Texas at Austin, the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, and the DOE Joint Genome Institute has produced a high-quality reference sequence of the complex switchgrass genome.

Unlocking PTSD: New study reveals why trauma-focused psychotherapy treatment works
MEDIA: Trauma-focused psychotherapy is the best-known treatment for PTSD. But how does it work?

How fat loss accelerates facial aging
For many of us, as we get older the skin on our face begins to sag and we seem to lose volume around our eyes, cheeks and chin.

Humanizing yeast ORC sheds light on cancer therapy and human development
Researchers from the HKSUST and the HKU recently demonstrated that the selectivity determinant of Origin Recognition Complex for DNA binding lies in a 19-amino acid insertion helix in the Orc4 subunit, which is present in yeast but absent in human.

A NEAT reduction of complex neuronal models accelerates brain research
Unlike their simple counterparts in artificial intelligence (AI) applications, neurons in the brain use dendrites - their intricate tree-like branches - to find relevant chunks of information.

IU researchers discover how breast cancer cells hide from immune attack
Researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified how breast cancer cells hide from immune cells to stay alive.

Historically redlined neighborhoods are more likely to lack greenspace today
Historically redlined neighborhoods are more likely to have a paucity of greenspace today compared to other neighborhoods.

Focusing on field analysis
One potential approach to developing a low-cost portable microscopy system is to use transparent microspheres in combination with affordable low-magnification objective lenses to increase image resolution and sensitivity.

Growth of northern Tibet proved the key to East Asian biodiversity
In a recent study, a joint research team led by scientists from Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the University of Bristol (UK) and the Open University (UK) has revealed the first direct mechanism explaining how the growth of mountains in Northern Tibet drastically altered climate, vegetation and plant diversity in East Asia.

Putting bugs on the menu, safely
The thought of eating insects is stomach turning for many, but new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research is shedding light on allergy causing proteins which could pose serious health risks for those suffering from shellfish allergy.

Examining oncology clinical trials launched before, during COVID-19 pandemic
Researchers evaluated the association between the pandemic and clinical research and development by studying the initiation of oncology clinical trials over time.

Well connected through amides
Linking molecular components through amide bonds is one of the most important reactions in research and the chemical industry.

Precision measurements of intracluster light suggest possible link to dark matter
Faint light from rogue stars not bound to galaxies has been something of a mystery to scientists.

Pioneering research unravels hidden origins of Eastern Asia's 'land of milk and honey'
A study has revealed for the first time the ancient origins of one of the world's most important ecosystems by unlocking the mechanism which determined the evolution of its mountains and how they shaped the weather there as well as its flora and fauna.

Consuming omega-3 fatty acids could prevent asthma
New research suggests that a higher dietary intake of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in childhood may reduce the risk of developing subsequent asthma, but only in children carrying a common gene variant.

Social media study reveals diabetics' fear of disrupted insulin supplies because of Brexit
Diabetics living in the UK worry about disruption to insulin supplies as a result of Brexit, new research shows.

Association of psychiatric disorders with mortality among patients with COVID-19
In this observational study of about 7,300 adults with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 in a New York health system, a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis was associated with an increased risk of death after adjusting for demographic and medical risk factors.

Mira's last journey: Exploring the dark universe
Scientists used a supercomputer to perform one of the five largest cosmological simulations ever -- the Last Journey.

Is there a link between cashless payments and unhealthy consumption?
The widespread use of cashless payments including credit cards, debit cards, and mobile apps has made transactions more convenient for consumers.

Germline whole exome sequencing reveals the potential role of hereditary predisposition and therapeutic implications in small cell lung cancer, a tobacco-related cancer
A study presented today by Dr. Nobuyuki Takahashi of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Bethesda, Md. at the IASLC World Conference on Lung Cancer Singapore demonstrates that small cell lung cancer (SCLC) may have an inherited predisposition and lays the foundation for understanding the interaction between genotype and tobacco exposure in exacerbating SCLC risk as well as potential therapeutic implications

'Smart' cartilage cells programmed to release drugs when stressed
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have engineered cartilage cells to release an anti-inflammatory drug in response to stresses such cells undergo when they are compressed during weight bearing and movement.

In Brazil, many smaller dams disrupt fish more than large hydropower projects
A new paper published Jan. 11 in Nature Sustainability quantifies the tradeoffs between hydroelectric generation capacity and the impacts on river connectivity for thousands of current and projected future dams across Brazil.

Scientists publish a blueprint to apply artificial intelligence to extend human longevity
The international team of artificial intelligence experts and medical doctors propose a framework for the application of next-generation AI to extend human longevity

People with severe atopic eczema may have increased risk of death from several causes
A new study has shown that, while there is limited evidence for overall increased mortality in patients with atopic eczema, those with severe atopic eczema may have a greater risk of dying from several health issues compared with those without eczema, according to a new study in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Study: Sudden police layoffs in one US city associated with increases in crime
A new study examined the effects on crime of budget shortfalls in two New Jersey cities--one of which laid off more than 10 percent of its police force while the other averted layoffs.

Antibiotic may improve outcomes for depression in people with low level inflammation
King's College London researchers have found evidence that minocycline, a widely used antibiotic with anti-inflammatory properties, gave greater improvement in depressive symptoms in patients with treatment resistant depression with low-grade peripheral inflammation.

Beckman Institute MRI expertise aids research on hemodialysis therapy patients
Beckman Institute researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign used a nonstandard magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate patients' response to a strategy to aid those with kidney failure undergoing hemodialysis therapy.

Micro-brewing goes more micro
A PhD student and 'beer scientist' has inadvertently discovered a way to conduct extremely small-scale brewing experiments, potentially leading to better beer.

Losing weight before knee surgery may not be beneficial for people with arthritis: Study
University of Alberta researchers find no evidence that BMI is a good determinant of surgical outcomes for osteoarthritis.

Squeeze it like toothpaste: The flexible brain of marsupial mammals
Being stretchy and squeezable may be the key to finding space for the brain in mammals, including humans.

Three mental health conditions contribute to violent offenses, WCU study finds
Western Carolina University researchers find a disproportionate number of inmates with violent offenses suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, panic disorder and alcohol use disorder, and published their findings in the Journal of Criminal Psychology.
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