Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

January 28, 2021
Technology bolsters use of chia seeds to help improve health, slow signs of aging
A Purdue University team has developed and patented a method to separate mucilage from chia seeds, yielding a protein-rich chia seed flour with improved bioactivity and functionality compared with conventional methods.

COVID-19: 1 in 3 adults anxious, depressed
COVID-19 has led to psychological distress among one in three adults, systematic review and meta-analysis reveals.

"Liquid" machine-learning system adapts to changing conditions
MIT researchers developed a neural network that learns on the job, not just during training.

Understanding how genetic motifs conduct "the music of life"
Our genetic codes control not only which proteins our cells produce, but also - to a great extent - in what quantity.

Link between dual sensory loss and depression
People with combined vision and hearing loss are nearly four times more likely to experience depression and more than three times more likely to suffer chronic anxiety, according to a new study published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology and led by Anglia Ruskin University (ARU).

Newly licensed autistic drivers crash less than other young drivers
A collaborative study found that compared with their non-autistic peers, young autistic drivers have lower rates of moving violations and license suspensions, as well as similar to lower crash rates.

Drug prices in the U.S. are 2.56 times those in other nations
Prescription drug prices in the United States average 2.56 times those seen in 32 other high-income nations, according to a new analysis.

First hybrid gene therapy shows early promise in treating long QT syndrome
In a new study published in Circulation, Mayo Clinic researchers provide the first preclinical, proof-of-concept study for hybrid gene therapy in long QT syndrome, a potentially lethal heart rhythm condition.

NUS scientists discover a new pathway essential for blood formation
Scientists from the National University of Singapore have discovered how a protein called Tip60 plays a vital role in the renewal of blood cells in the body.

Generous parental leave leads to staff shortages, nursing home deaths
A new paper in the Review of Economic Studies finds that a generous parental leave policy nurses enjoyed in Denmark caused nursing shortages, which resulted in a decline in the quality of hospital and nursing home care.

Skoltech team developed on-chip printed 'electronic nose'
Skoltech researchers and their colleagues from Russia and Germany have designed an on-chip printed 'electronic nose' that serves as a proof of concept for low-cost and sensitive devices to be used in portable electronics and healthcare.

Majority skeptical healthcare costs will fall anytime soon as Biden begins presidency
In his inaugural address, President Biden vowed that 'help is on the way' to a nation grappling with a pandemic that has already claimed over 420,000 lives and counting.

635 million-year-old fungi-like microfossil that bailed us out of an ice age discovered
A team of scientists from Virginia Tech, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guizhou Education University, and University of Cincinnati has discovered the remains of a fungi-like microfossil that emerged at the end of an ice age some 635 million years ago.

First mammography screening guidelines issued for older survivors of breast cancer
A nationwide panel of experts has developed the first mammography guidelines for older survivors of breast cancer, providing a framework for discussions between survivors and their physicians on the pros and cons of screening in survivors' later years.

How the brain is programmed for computer programming?
Expert computer programmers show higher proficiency in certain behavioural and attention skills than their novice peers.

First study to look at potency of maternal antibodies
In a new study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers will unveil findings that suggest that women who contract COVID-19 during pregnancy are able to make antibodies, but that transfer of these antibodies to their infants is less than expected.

Nanoparticle drug delivery technique shows promise for treating pancreatic cancer
Veterans Affairs researchers have designed a new way to deliver pancreatic cancer drugs that could make fighting the disease much easier.

Voters perceive political candidates with a disability as qualified for elected office
Political candidates with a disability have historically been underrepresented. A new study has found for the first time that voters do not apply certain stereotypes associated with disability to such candidates.

Improvements to holographic displays poised to enhance virtual and augmented reality
Researchers have developed a new approach that improves the image quality and contrast for holographic displays.

Blood discoveries advance efforts to grow organs, battle cancer
Researchers have developed a simple and efficient way to generate ''hemogenic endothelial cells,'' the first stop in the production line of blood cells.

Light pollution linked to preterm births, reduced birth weights
Researchers discovered that light pollution is linked to preterm birth, a shortened gestational length, and reduced birth weight. babies born too early have higher rates of death and disability.

Listening to the call of the wild: Tracking deer movements using sound
Researchers from The University of Tokyo built a prototype system for monitoring deer populations in the wild using sound recording devices in a grid formation.

Eyes reveal life history of fish
If you look deep into the eyes of a fish, it will tell you its life story.

Modeling study of ancient thumbs traces the history of hominin thumb dexterity
Researchers analyzing the biomechanics and efficiency of the thumb across different fossil human species using virtual muscle modeling, revealed new insight into when these abilities first arose and what they've meant for the development of more complex human culture.

Machine-learning to predict the performance of organic solar cells
Researchers from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV) specialized in Artificial Intelligence have collaborated with researchers from Institute of Materials Science of Barcelona, specialized on materials for energy applications, to combine the experimental data points that they gather with artificial intelligence algorithms and enable an unprecedented predicting capability of the performance of organic solar cells.

Pharmaceutical research: when active substance and target protein 'embrace' each other
Scientists at Goethe University Frankfurt, together with colleagues from Darmstadt, Heidelberg, Oxford and Dundee (UK), have investigated how the fit of potent inhibitors to their binding sites can be optimised so that they engage longer with their target proteins.

Scientists find key function of molecule in cells crucial for regulating immunity
UNC School of Medicine scientists led by Jenny Ting, PhD, the William Kenan Distinguished Professor of Genetics, and Yisong Wan, PhD, professor of microbiology and immunology, discovered that AIM2 is important for the proper function of regulatory T cells, or Treg cells, and plays a key role in mitigating autoimmune disease.

Press briefing highlights disparities among key groups
Several leading international lung cancer researchers at a press briefing held by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer today, presented compelling new data revealing that factors of race, gender, sexual orientation and income continue to be significant barriers to those living with lung cancer.

'Honey, I'm home:' Pandemic life for married couples can lead to sadness, anger
West Virginia University researchers led a study examining 165 married individuals and how their partners interfered with their daily routines in April 2020, a month into the pandemic.

People's acceptance of inequality affects response to company wrongdoings
People who do not accept inequality are more likely to negatively evaluate companies that have committed wrongdoings than people who do accept inequality, and this response varies by culture, according to researchers at Penn State.

Brain 3D genome study uncovers human-specific regulatory changes during development
A team led by Prof. SU Bing from the Kunming Institute of Zoology (KIZ) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Prof.

Leading cardiovascular organizations call for urgent action to reduce air pollution
Air pollution is a key risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and a major contributor to the global burden of disease.

Efficient fluorescent materials and OLEDs for the NIR
Near-infrared emitters (NIR) will be of crucial importance for a variety of biomedical, security and defence applications, as well as for (in)visible light communications and the internet-of-things (IoT).

Wood formation can now be followed in real-time -- and possibly serve the climate of tomorrow
A genetic engineering method makes it possible to observe how woody cell walls are built in plants.

They're just not that into you: Consumer-brand relationship insights
To reap benefits from a variety of brand relationships, marketers should match their marketing communications to how close or distant consumers feel toward their brands.

Post-overdose outreach programs in Massachusetts expanding
Boston Medical Center has released a study that shows post overdose outreach programs in Massachusetts have expanded across the state, as 44 percent of municipalities reported having such programs available - a majority established since 2015 - to reduce risks for those who survive an overdose.

Genetic analysis of symptoms yields new insights into PTSD
A new study led by researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Diego (UCSD) uncovers intriguing genetic similarities between PTSD and other mental health disorders such as anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.

Turning food waste back into food
UC Riverside scientists have discovered fermented food waste can boost bacteria that increase crop growth, making plants more resistant to pathogens and reducing carbon emissions from farming.

Size matters: How the size of a male's weapons affects its anti-predator tactics
When males have to fight for reproductive rights, having larger weapons such as horns gives them an edge.

Coronavirus was brought into Russia at least 67 times
A research team from HSE University and SkolTech, together with experts from the Smorodintsev Research Institute of Influenza in St.

Risk-taking linked to particular brain features
There is a common genetic and neurobiological basis for risky behavior - the genetic disposition for risk-taking is mapped in several areas of the brain, a UZH study shows.

Physicists develop record-breaking source for single photons
Researchers at the University of Basel and Ruhr University Bochum have developed a source of single photons that can produce billions of these quantum particles per second.

Gender and spatial behavior
Research based on the daily movements of people living in a contemporary hunter-gatherer society provides new evidence for links between the gendered division of labor in human societies over the past 2.5 million years and differences in the way men and women think about space.

Reforming the 'scoop' system that hurts science
Science is society's best method for understanding the world, yet many people in the field are unhappy with the way it works.

How a cancer drug carrier's structure can help selectively target cancer cells
Porphyrins are interesting drug delivery vehicles that can specifically accumulate in cancer cells.

OSU smoke- and tobacco-free policies grew more popular over time, even among tobacco users
Support for policies prohibiting smoking and the use of tobacco products on Oregon State University's Corvallis campus grew substantially over a five-year span, especially among tobacco users, a recent OSU study found.

Outcomes of COVID-19 among hospitalized health care workers in North America
This study finds that being a health care worker isn't associated with poorer outcomes among patients hospitalized with COVID-19.

Reconstruction shows increased global warming trends since 1850s
To better understand how temperatures have increased, an international team led by researchers at Sun Yat-Sen University in China has released a newly merged global surface temperature dataset, including reconstructed land and marine measurements from the 1850s to 2018.

Baylor study: Management without morals can lead to employees' unethical behavior
An organization that projects an ethical face but whose managers fail to respond to internal ethical situations sends mixed messages to its employees, which can lead to a lack of employees' moral courage and an increase in unethical behavior, according to a study led by a Baylor University researcher.

High schoolers discover four exoplanets through Harvard and Smithsonian mentorship program
They may be the youngest astronomers to make a discovery yet.

Drugs used to treat HIV and flu can have detrimental impact on crops
Scientists from the UK and Kenya found that lettuce plants exposed to a higher concentration of four commonly-used antiviral and antiretroviral medicines could be more than a third smaller in biomass than those grown in a drug-free environment.

Entrepreneurs benefit more from emotional intelligence than other competencies, such as IQ
Running a successful business has its challenges, but the COVID-19 pandemic has required many owners to pivot and look for new ways to operate profitably while keeping employees and consumers safe.

Deeper insight into how tick spit suppresses cattle immunity
A tick saliva study reveals immune responses that could lead to better protection for cattle.

National laboratories' look to the future of light sources with new magnet prototype
After more than 15 years of work, scientists at three DOE national laboratories have succeeded in creating and testing an advanced, more powerful superconducting magnet made of niobium and tin for use in the next generation of light sources.

Using zirconium as an additive in super-strong composite materials
Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are incredibly strong materials used in jet engines, gas turbines, and cutting tools for nickel superalloys.

Study reveals cause of common Zika virus birth defect
CLEVELAND - Cleveland Clinic researchers have described for the first time how Zika virus (ZIKV) causes one of the most common birth defects associated with prenatal infection, called brain calcification, according to new study findings published in Nature Microbiology. The findings may reveal novel strategies to prevent prenatal ZIKV brain calcification and offer important insights into how calcifications form in other congenital infections.

New treatment helps patients with a spinal cord injury
Spinal cord injuries disrupt the mechanism by which our bodies regulate blood pressure.

Scientists discover how remdesivir works to inhibit coronavirus
By pinning down the exact mechanism by which remdesivir shuts down SARS-CoV-2's process of copying genetic material, scientists now have clues to make even more effective antivirals to fight COVID-19.

Thick lithosphere casts doubt on plate tectonics in Venus's geologically recent past
A study of a giant impact crater on Venus suggests that its lithosphere was too thick to have had Earth-like plate tectonics, at least for much of the past billion years.

New Geology articles published online ahead of print in January
Eleven new articles were published ahead of print for Geology in January 2021.

Viral sequencing can reveal how SARS-CoV-2 spreads and evolves
The article summarizes key insights about SARS-CoV-2 that have already been gained by sequencing of its genome from individual patient samples.

Screening asymptomatic health care personnel for COVID-19 not recommended by experts
Routine screening of asymptomatic health care personnel in the absence of confirmed exposures to COVID-19 is not a recommended strategy for preventing transmission of COVID-19, according to a new review.

Scientists 'farm' natural killer cells in novel cancer fighting approach
Engineers and oncologists teamed to develop a microfluidic chip capable of capturing the body's natural killer immune cells to harvest their cancer-killing exosomes.

Sotorasib provides durable clinical benefit for patients with NSCLC and KRAS mutations
In the phase II CodeBreak 100 trial, sotorasib provided durable clinical benefit with a favorable safety profile in patients with pretreated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and who harbor KRAS p.G12C mutations, validating CodeBreak 100's phase I results, according to research presented today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer World Conference on Lung Cancer.

New biosensors quickly detect coronavirus proteins and antibodies
Researchers have designed protein-based biosensors that glow when mixed with targeted molecules, such as components of the pandemic coronavirus or specific COVID-19 antibodies.

How a little-known glycoprotein blocks a cancer cell's immune response
Researchers uncovered how stanniocalcin-1, or STC1, works inside a tumor cell to block a cellular ''eat-me'' signal that typically triggers the immune system to produce T cells to fight the tumor.

New AI-severity score COVID-19 integrating CT images published to Nature Communications
Owkin, a French-American startup pioneering AI and Federated Learning in medical research, has been focusing it's COVID-19 research efforts on aspects of the pandemic that still require much public health attention, despite the arrival of an effective vaccine.

Malaria threw human evolution into overdrive on this African archipelago
Malaria is an ancient scourge, but it's still leaving its mark on the human genome.

'Be a man': Why some men respond aggressively to threats to manhood
When their manhood is threatened, some men respond more aggressively than others.

Lasing mechanism found in water droplets
As reported in Advanced Photonics, Chen's NTU team recently discovered that when a water droplet interacts with a surface to form a contact angle, the interfacial molecular forces determine the geometry of a droplet resonator.

US must unify atmospheric biology research or risk national security, scientists say
Global circulating winds can carry bacteria, fungal spores, viruses and pollen over long distances and across national borders, but the United States is ill-prepared to confront future disease outbreaks or food-supply threats caused by airborne organisms, says a new paper published in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Applications.

AERA and Spencer Foundation release report on the COVID-19 impact on early career scholars
AERA and the Spencer Foundation have released a report, Voices from the Field: The Impact of COVID-19 on Early Career Scholars and Doctoral Students, that shares findings from focus groups conducted in spring 2020.

Study shows why anesthetic stops cell's walkers in their tracks
Researchers detail the mechanism that allows propofol, a common anesthetic, to halt the movement of kinesin proteins that deliver cargoes to the far reaches of cells.

Frequent cannabis use by young people linked to decline in IQ
A study has found that adolescents who frequently use cannabis may experience a decline in Intelligence Quotient (IQ) over time.

Crowdfunding? Check weather forecast first!
Investors' moods are affected by gloomy weather. New research from Copenhagen Business School recommends entrepreneurs looking for finance should be aware of the weather forecast at the time they want to launch their crowdfunding campaigns.

Heparin targets coronavirus spike protein, research shows
An international team of researchers has found that the common anticoagulant drug heparin inhibits the SARS-Cov2 virus spike protein, by reducing the virus' ability to attach to human cells and infect them.

Study shows when housing quality is poor, children suffer
A new nationally representative study in the Journal of Child Health Care, led by researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital, has found poor-quality housing is independently associated with poorer pediatric health, and suggests ways health care providers and housing programs may address those findings.

Otago study examines attitudes toward climate change risk
A University of Otago study explored factors which influence Americans' levels of concern over climate change, providing discussion on how those factors could impact mitigation efforts.

Enhanced recovery efforts for cesarean delivery reduce need for opioids by 80%
In a retrospective analysis of cesarean deliveries from 2015 through 2020, doctors from the Colorado Fetal Care Center at Children's Hospital Colorado found that using a wound infusion pump in combination with enhanced recovery efforts like removing urinary catheters earlier and walking around the same day of surgery can reduce opioid use by more than 80%.

Dalian coherent light source reveals the origin of interstellar medium S2 fragments
Researchers observed the C+S2 product channel from CS2 photodissociation for the first time using a home-made Time-Sliced Velocity Map Ion Imaging (TS-VMI) experimental setup, based on the Dalian Coherent Light Source (DCLS).

Food export restrictions by a few countries could skyrocket global food crop prices
Recent events such as the Covid-19 pandemic, locust infestations, drought and labour shortages have disrupted food supply chains, endangering food security in the process.

New IOF position paper urges routine use of DXA-VFA in fracture liaison services
A new position paper by an International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) Fracture Working Group reviews the clinical significance of vertebral fractures, and the rationale for performing vertebral fracture assessment (VFA) routinely within post-fracture care coordination programs such as fracture liaison services (FLS).

Mechanism for how pancreatic cancer evades immunotherapy elucidated
Pancreatic cancer, one of the most lethal of all cancers, is capable of evading attacks by immune cells by changing its microenvironment so that the immune cells suppress, rather than support, an attack on the tumor.

Researchers reveal in-situ manipulation of active Au-TiO2 interface
An international joint research team from the Shanghai Advanced Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, along with Zhejiang University and the Technical University of Denmark, reported an in-situ strategy to manipulate interfacial structure with atomic precision during catalytic reactions.

Simulation helps refine pediatric care guidelines for COVID-19
DALLAS - Jan. 28, 2021 - Simulation can be a viable way to quickly evaluate and refine new medical guidelines and educate hospital staff in new procedures, a recent study from UT Southwestern's Department of Pediatrics shows.

NTU study finds Singapore public less keen on drone use in residential areas than industrial zones
When it comes to drones, the Singapore public is not as keen for them to be used to provide services around their living spaces, finds a study by researchers at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore).

Using science to explore a 60-year-old Russian mystery
Researchers from EPFL and ETH Zurich have conducted an original scientific study that puts forth a plausible explanation for the mysterious 1959 death of nine hikers in the Ural Mountains in the former Soviet Union.

New ion trap to create the world's most accurate mass spectrometer
Mass spectrometers are widely used to analyze highly complex chemical and biological mixtures.

An efficient tool to link X-ray experiments and ab initio theory
The electronic structure of complex molecules and their chemical reactivity can be assessed by the method of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at BESSY II.

New gene variant linked to stroke
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden believe they have identified a gene variant that can cause cerebral small vessel disease and stroke.

New concept for rocket thruster exploits the mechanism behind solar flares
A new type of rocket thruster that could take humankind to Mars and beyond has been proposed by a physicist at PPPL.

Genomic studies implicate specific genes in post-traumatic stress disorder
After analyzing the genomes of more 250,000 military veterans, researchers have identified 18 specific, fixed positions on chromosomes that appear associated with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Neural network has learned to identify tree species
Skoltech scientists have developed an algorithm that can identify various tree species in satellite images.

New catalyst moves seawater desalination, hydrogen production closer to commercialization
Seawater is abundant and cheap, making it a tempting resource to meet the world's growing need for clean drinking water and carbon-free energy.

Harnessing the power of AI to understand warm dense matter
The study of warm dense matter helps us understand what is going on inside giant planets, brown dwarfs, and neutron stars.

Discovery of early plasma biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease
A Quebec research team has discovered two early plasma markers to detect Alzheimer's disease five years before its onset.

Rules of resistance against transgene silencing
A new protocol brings the precise standards of engineering to the realm of synthetic biology.

Researchers use patients' cells to test gene therapy for rare eye disease
Scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have developed a promising gene therapy strategy for a rare disease that causes severe vision loss in childhood.

George Mason University expands testing and tracking behind faculty research
George Mason University announces it is introducing a rapid-result, saliva-based COVID-19 test that will greatly expand testing capabilities on its campuses this spring.

Research illuminates lobsters' genetic response to changing climate
The American lobster, which supports the most valuable fishery in North America, may be more susceptible to climate change than previously thought.

Breakthrough for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy
Researchers under the leadership of Heping Zeng at East China Normal University in Shanghai recently demonstrated a novel technique: plasma-grating-induced breakdown spectroscopy (GIBS).

X-Ray tomography lets researchers watch solid-state batteries charge, discharge
Using X-ray tomography, a research team has observed the internal evolution of the materials inside solid-state lithium batteries as they were charged and discharged.

Chinese spice helps unravel the mysteries of human touch
New insight into how human brains detect and perceive different types of touch, such as fluttery vibrations and steady pressures, has been revealed by UCL scientists with the help of the ancient Chinese cooking ingredient, Szechuan pepper.

At-home swabs diagnose infections as accurately as healthcare worker-collected swabs
Self swabs and caregiver swabs are effective at detecting multiple pathogens and are just as accurate as those taken by healthcare workers, according to a team of Australian researchers.

Rumen additive and controlled energy benefit dairy cows during dry period
Getting nutrition right during a dairy cow's dry period can make a big difference to her health and the health of her calf.

Counties with more cannabis dispensaries show reduced opioid deaths
This is the first study to examine the association between active cannabis dispensary operations -- both medical and recreational -- and opioid-related mortality rates at the county level, suggesting that providing alternative pain management could improve public health outcomes, researchers said.

Ecologists conducted a novel study on vegetation transpiration from a global network of 251 sites
An ecologist from RUDN University together with colleagues from 14 countries compared three methods for estimating ecosystem transpiration in a study.

The decline in grazing practices threatens the existence of a Basque cheese
Of the many different research projects in which Lactiker is involved, of particular interest is its work on the Idiazabal cheese production process, which is based on grazing.

Transportation investments could save hundreds of lives, billions of dollars
Investments in infrastructure to promote bicycling and walking could save as many as 770 lives and $7.6 billion each year across 12 northeastern states and the District of Columbia under the proposed Transportation and Climate Initiative (TCI), according to a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and Harvard T.H.

Experiments show the record of early life could be full of "false positives"
For most of Earth's history, life was limited to the microscopic realm, with bacteria occupying nearly every possible niche.

Osteoporosis, controversial fractures and various bone markers
Aging and lifestyle-related metabolic imbalances cause the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs).

New study unravels Darwin's 'abominable mystery' surrounding origin of flowering plants
The origin of flowering plants famously puzzled Charles Darwin, who described their sudden appearance in the fossil record from relatively recent geological times as an 'abominable mystery'.

Loggerhead sea turtles lay eggs in multiple locations to improve reproductive success
Although loggerhead sea turtles return to the same beach where they hatched to lay their eggs, a new study finds individual females lay numerous clutches of eggs in locations miles apart from each other to increase the chance that some of their offspring will survive.

From heat to spin to electricity: Understanding spin transport in thermoelectric devices
Spin thermoelectric materials are an area of active research because of their potential applications in thermal energy harvesters.

How evolution can change science for the better
Researchers have developed a new model to better understand the challenges facing the scientific process and how we can make it better.

Sleep disorders: Patients often underestimate their total sleep time
People with sleep disorders commonly have a misperception about their actual sleep behaviour.

Livestock workers face high MRSA risk
For Michigan State University's Felicia Wu, the surprise isn't that people who work with livestock are at higher risk of picking up antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but instead how much higher their risk levels are.

A glimpse into the wardrobe of King David and King Solomon, 3000 years ago
In groundbreaking research, archaeologists have recovered scraps of fabric dyed in royal purple from the time of King David and King Solomon.

Top 10 work rrends for 2021
The topics on SIOP's 2021 Top 10 Work Trends list are multifaceted and complex--some have been on prior years' lists and others are very focused trends resulting from the distress of a global pandemic and critical social issues that came to the forefront in 2020.

Rare genetic syndrome identified, caused by mutations in gene SATB1
Variations in the gene SATB1 have been shown to cause a rare genetic syndrome.

Study details N439K variant of SARS-CoV-2
An international team of researchers has characterized the effect and molecular mechanisms of an amino acid change in the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein N439K.

New research finds severity of COVID-19 determines likelihood of pregnancy complications
Researchers will unveil findings that suggest that pregnant women who become severely or critically ill due to COVID-19 are at greater risk of dying and experiencing serious pregnancy complications compared to pregnant women who have COVID-19 but were asymptomatic, or without symptoms.

Chemists settle battery debate, propel research forward
A team of researchers led by chemists at Brookhaven National Laboratory has identified new details of the reaction mechanism that takes place in batteries with lithium metal anodes.

Fetal and neonatal therapies improve prognosis of congenital cytomegalovirus infection
A cross-institutional research group has revealed for the first time in the world that infants with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection who were treated with a combination of immunoglobulin fetal therapy and neonatal therapy with antiviral drugs were less likely to experience the severe aftereffects associated with the infection than those who only received the neonatal therapy.

The Lancet: Study estimates that, without vaccination against 10 diseases, mortality in children under five would be 45% higher in low-income and middle-income countries
Vaccinations against 10 major pathogens have a substantial impact on public health in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), according to new modelling research published in The Lancet. The study estimated that from 2000 to 2019 vaccinations have prevented 37 million deaths, and that this figure will increase to 69 million deaths for the period 2000-2030.

Risk-taking behavior has a signature in the brain, big data shows
While there is no such thing as a single ''risk area'' of the brain, a study of 12,000 people led by the University of Pennsylvania's Gideon Nave found a connection between genes, lower levels of gray matter, and risky behavior.

3D printing resins in dental devices may be toxic to reproductive health
Two commercially available 3D-printable resins, which are marketed as being biocompatible for use in dental applications, readily leach compounds into their surroundings.

Risk analysis helps contend with uncertainty of in-person activities
People now have access to better real-time information about COVID-19 infection and transmission rates, but they still have to decide what is safe to do.

Scholars reveal the changing nature of U.S. cities
New findings buck the historical view that most cities in the United States developed in similar ways.

Immune system sets 'tripwire' to protect against viruses
A new study by UC San Diego biologists has revealed insights on the intricate, adaptive mechanisms of a protective system employed by the cells of mammalian immune systems.

Marine heatwaves becoming more intense, more frequent
When thick, the surface layer of the ocean acts as a buffer to extreme marine heating--but a new study from the University of Colorado Boulder shows this ''mixed layer'' is becoming shallower each year.

The Lancet Public Health: Ethnic health disparities among older adults in England equivalent to 20-year age difference, even before COVID-19
In 15 out of 17 minority ethnic groups, health-related quality of life in older age (over 55 year-olds) was worse on average for either men, women, or both, than for White British people according to an observational study published in The Lancet Public Health journal.

It's elemental: Ultra-trace detector tests gold purity
Ultra-trace radiation detection technique sets new global standard for measuring the nearly immeasurable

An ancient economy
As one of the most experienced archaeologists studying California's Native Americans, Lynn Gamble(link is external) knew the Chumash Indians had been using shell beads as money for at least 800 years.

New psychological model predicts who panic-buys during times of crisis
Drawing on animal-foraging theory, a new model predicts psychological factors that may lead to panic buying during times of crisis.

How coronavirus damages lung cells within mere hours
Boston University team has revealed the most comprehensive map to date of all the molecular activities that are triggered inside lung cells at the onset of coronavirus infection.
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