Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

February 04, 2021
Emory MVA COVID-19 vaccine safe and effective in animal models
Yerkes NPRC/Emory University researchers have developed a COVID-19 vaccine that has proven safe and effective in mice and monkeys.

Electronic health records can be valuable predictor of those likeliest to die from COVID
A study by Massachusetts General Hospital identifies key predictors of COVID-19 mortality among different age groups from patient longitudinal medical records.

Study links brain cells to depression
Major depressive disorder is a significant medical condition that leads to a variety of serious emotional and physical problems.

Exercise caution after working out in virtual reality
Virtual 'exergaming' has become a popular way to exercise - especially among younger people - since the release of virtual reality (VR) fitness games on consoles such as Nintendo and Playstation.

Drinking green tea, coffee lowers risk of death for stroke and heart attack survivors
Stroke survivors who drank seven or more cups of green tea each day lowered their risks of multiple causes of death by 62%.

Polymer-derived carbon as metal-free, "green" alternative to catalysts and nano carbons
Darmstadt, February 4, 2021. The research group of Professor Bastian Etzold at the Department of Chemistry at TU Darmstadt has succeeded in synthesizing macroscopic carbons that are similar in handling to common technical catalysts.

Imaging technique provides link to innovative products
A study led by University of Georgia researchers announces the successful use of a new nanoimaging technique that will allow researchers to test and identify two-dimensional materials

Probiotics or prebiotics? Exploring the complex world of 'gut' health
Elena Goun at the University of Missouri and an international team of scientists have developed a noninvasive diagnostic imaging tool to measure the levels of a naturally occurring enzyme -- bile salt hydrolase -- inside the body's entire gastrointestinal tract.

New report explores effect of coffee through our daily sleep and wake cycles
New report reviews latest research into coffee's effect on sleep.

Scientists optimized technology for production of optical materials for microelectronics
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) have advanced the technology of high-speed sintering for optical ceramics (Nd3+:YAG), i.e. active elements generating laser emission in the near-infrared wavelength range (1.06 μm) for cutting the edge microelectronics and medicine.

Human-generated noise pollution dominates the ocean's soundscape
The soundscapes of the Anthropocene ocean are fundamentally different from those of pre-industrial times, becoming more and more a raucous cacophony as the noise from human activity has grown louder and more prevalent.

'Where did I park my car?' Brain stimulation improves mental time travel
A new Northwestern Medicine study improved memory of complex, realistic events similar to these by applying transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the brain network responsible for memory.

New methods for exploring the 'dark matter' of biology
New tools and methods have been described by WEHI researchers to study an unusual protein modification and gain fresh insights into its roles in human health and disease.

Nickel phosphide nanoparticle catalyst is the full package
Osaka University researchers prepared a nickel phosphide nanoparticle catalyst on a hydrotalcite support (nano-Ni2P/HT) that showed high activity and selectivity in the hydrogenation of D-glucose to D-sorbitol. The catalyst was air-stable, reusable, and effective in water and at 25°C or 1 bar hydrogen gas pressure.

Helping consumers save more by bursting their bubble of financial responsibility
When people perceive that their past financial behaviors have fallen short of their desired standard, they start to save more to restore perceptions of financial responsibility.

Female breast cancer surpasses lung as the most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide
Cancer ranks as a leading cause of death in every country in the world, and, for the first time, female breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer, overtaking lung cancer, according to a collaborative report, Global Cancer Statistics 2020, from the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).

Fecal microbiota transplants help patients with advanced melanoma respond to immunotherapy
For patients with cancers that do not respond to immunotherapy drugs, adjusting the composition of microorganisms in the intestines--known as the gut microbiome--through the use of stool, or fecal, transplants may help some of these individuals respond to the immunotherapy drugs, a new study suggests.

Food allergies are more common among Black children
Black children have significantly higher rates of shellfish and fish allergies than White children, in addition to having higher odds of wheat allergy, suggesting that race may play an important role in how children are affected by food allergies, researchers at Ann & Robert H.

A new tool in the search for axions
Researchers have discovered a new avenue to search for axions--a hypothetical particle that is one of the candidates of dark matter particles.

Father's early-life exposure to stress associated with child's brain development
The FinnBrain research of the University of Turku has demonstrated for the first time that the stress the father has experienced in his childhood is connected to the development of the white matter tracts in the child's brain.

Machine-learning model helps determine protein structures
MIT biologists have developed a computer modeling technique that lets them use cryo-electron microscopy to identify multiple possible structures that a protein can take.

'Stealthy' stem cells better for treating tendon injuries in horses
Treating equine donor stem cells with a growth factor called TGF-β2 may allow them to avoid ''tripping'' the immune response in recipients, according to new research.

Toshiba's new algorithms quickly deliver highly accurate solutions to complex problems
Toshiba has announced new algorithms developed from the Simulated Bifurcation algorithm (SB).

Fossil pigments shed new light on vertebrate evolution
This new paper shows that melanin is more than just something that gives colour to the body.

Innovation from Vienna: Ultrasound in the treatment of brain diseases
Ultrasound is not only used as an imaging technique but targeted pulses of ultrasound can be used as a highly accurate treatment for a range of brain diseases.

Songbirds exposed to lead-contaminated water show telltale signs about human impacts
Researchers discovered lead levels like those reported in Flint, Michigan, can interfere with the neural mechanisms of vocal development of songbirds and affect mate attraction.

Even in same desert location, species experience differences in exposure to climate warming
Despite living in the same part of the Mojave Desert, and experiencing similar conditions, mammals and birds native to this region experienced fundamentally different exposures to climate warming over the last 100 years, a new study shows; small mammal communities there remained much more stable than birds, in the face of local climate change, it reports.

Deforestation is stressing mammals out
By analyzing hormones that accumulate in fur, researchers found that rodents and marsupials living in smaller patches of South America's Atlantic Forest are under more stress than ones living in more intact forests.

New eco-friendly technique protects rice plants against devastating fungal infection
Researchers have developed a new technique to protect rice seeds against fungal infections that can ruin up to half of all rice crops in the world.

Ultimately, beneficial fungi could be more effective than pesticides against nematodes
Over the past 30 years, the use of soil fumigants and nematicides used to protect cole crops, such as broccoli and Brussel sprouts, against cyst nematode pathogens in coastal California fields has decreased dramatically.

Uncovering a link between inflammation and heart disease
Patients with cardiac disease often have chronic inflammation that damages their hearts, even with no infection present.

Zinc may help with fertility during COVID-19 pandemic, researchers report
Wayne State University School of Medicine researchers have reported that zinc supplements for men and women attempting to conceive either naturally or through assisted reproduction during the COVID-19 pandemic may prevent mitochondrial damage in young egg and sperm cells.

Clinical trial: Using MRI for prostate cancer diagnosis equals or beats current standard
The results of a Phase III randomized clinical trial have shown that when it comes to detecting clinically significant prostate cancer, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with targeted biopsies (MRI-TBx) matches the current standard and brings a multitude of advantages.

Sweden ahead of Denmark in the public sector organic food race
Sweden takes first, Denmark second and Norway lags at the bottom when it comes to how much organic food is served in canteens, kindergartens and other public sector workplaces across the three Nordic nations.

Fecal transplant turns cancer immunotherapy non-responders into responders
A phase II clinical trial shows that changing the gut microbiome through fecal transplant can transform cancer patients who never responded to immunotherapy into patients who do.

California's rainy season starting nearly a month later than it did 60 years ago
The start of California's annual rainy season has been pushed back from November to December, prolonging the state's increasingly destructive wildfire season by nearly a month, according to new research.

Hidden world just below the surface
A team of scientists from NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Arizona State University and elsewhere have discovered that a diverse array of marine animals find refuge in so-called 'surface slicks' in Hawai'i.

Can a fin become a limb?
Researchers at Harvard and Boston Children's Hospital examine what's happening at genetic level to drive patterns in fin skeleton versus limb skeleton and find mutants with modified fins in a more limb-like pattern by adding new bones, complete with muscles and joints.

Global warming found to be culprit for flood risk in Peruvian Andes, other glacial lakes
Human-caused warming is responsible for increasing the risk of a glacial outburst flood from Peru's Lake Palcacocha, threatening the city below.

NANOGrav finds possible 'first hints' of low-frequency gravitational wave background
In data gathered and analyzed over 13 years, the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) Physics Frontiers Center (PFC) has found an intriguing low-frequency signal that may be attributable to gravitational waves.

How elephants evolved to become big and cancer-resistant
In this new study, 'We explored how elephants and their living and extinct relatives evolved to be cancer-resistant,' says University at Buffalo biologist Vincent Lynch.

Deadly white-nose syndrome changed genes in surviving bats
Scientists have found genetic differences between bats killed by white-nose syndrome and bats that survived, suggesting that survivors rapidly evolve to resist the fungal disease, according to a Rutgers-led study with big implications for deciding how to safeguard bat populations.

Quasicrystal-clear: Material reveals unique shifting surface structure under microscope
Ever since their discovery, quasicrystals have garnered much attention due to their strange structure.

New quantum receiver the first to detect entire radio frequency spectrum
A new quantum sensor can analyze the full spectrum of radio frequency and real-world signals, unleashing new potentials for soldier communications, spectrum awareness and electronic warfare.

City, University of London academic tracks COVID-19 dark web marketplace before vaccine
Dr Andrea Baronchelli, and colleagues have carried out insightful research into the dark web marketplace (DWM) trade in products related to COVID-19; they have revealed the need for the continuous monitoring of dark web marketplaces (DWMs) especially in light of the current shortage and availability of coronavirus vaccines.

New study finds cage-free egg-laying hen mortality declines over time
New research published today in the journal Scientific Reports based on the largest-to-date analysis of commercial data on egg-laying hen mortality finds that survival rates in higher-welfare cage-free housing systems increase over time as managers gain experience and knowledge accrues.

New technique rapidly quantifies immune response following vaccination
A global team of researchers has developed a new strategy for fast and reliable antibody tests, which can quantify the immune response induced by vaccination and reveal the timeline and stage of pathogen infection.

Human immune cells have natural alarm system against HIV
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a potential way to eradicate the latent HIV infection that lies dormant inside infected immune cells.

Cancer leading cause of death among people with diabetes
Cancer is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes in England.

A personal benefit of social distancing: lower odds of getting COVID-19
Considering the greater good by social distancing during a pandemic turns out to have an attractive personal benefit: A new study has found that staying away from others also reduces an individual person's chances of contracting COVID-19.

New guidance on how cardiac patients with diabetes can exercise more safely
Cardiac patients who also have diabetes will be able to do their rehabilitation exercises more safely, thanks to the world's first guidance on the subject, which has been published by international experts including a Swansea University academic.

COVID-19 vaccine from new vaccine platform effective in mice
It is necessary to develop additional COVID-19 vaccines, as different vaccine approaches have their advantages and disadvantages and may work synergistically.

MARLIT, artificial intelligence against marine litter
Floating sea macro-litter is a threat to the conservation of marine ecosystems worldwide.

Comb-like etching regulated growth for large-area graphene nanoribbon arrays
The low on/off current ratio in intrinsic graphene-based field-effect transistor has inspired the development of bandgap engineering, which contain tailoring graphene into narrow ribbons, doping graphene with heteroatom, and applying stress or vertical electric field.

Repeated testing for COVID-19 is vital, economic and public health analysis shows
Epidemiologists at The University of Texas at Austin and other institutions have a new analysis that shows the value of having all people in the U.S. tested on a regular, rotating basis to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus and the loss of life from COVID-19.

Researchers replicate a potential step of the fin-to-limb transition in zebrafish
By tweaking a single gene, scientists engineered zebrafish that show the beginnings of limb-like appendages.

Clients of female sex workers should be targeted for HIV prevention and treatment in South Africa
The researchers found that over a ten-year period (2010-19), sex between female sex workers and their paying clients contributed 6.9 per cent of new HIV infections, while sex between clients with their non-paying partners contributed 41.9 per cent

Surface effect of electrodes revealed by operando surface science methodology
Super-dense anions together with cations intercalation into the surface region of graphite electrode has been visualized by applying operando surface science methodology over an Al/HOPG planar model device.

Book developed at Cincinnati Children's helps identify risks of reading difficulties
A study published in the journal Pediatrics expands validation evidence for a new screening tool that directly engages preschool-age children during clinic visits to assess their early literacy skills.

States with more gun laws have lower youth gun violence, Rutgers study finds
Gun violence among children is lower in states with more gun laws, according to a Rutgers-led study.

New test provides fast and accurate diagnosis of liposarcomas
Researchers have leveraged the latest advances in RNA technology and machine learning methods to develop a gene panel test that allows for highly accurate diagnosis of the most common types of liposarcoma.

City, University of London academic tracks COVID-19 dark web marketplaces
New research carried out by Dr Andrea Baronchelli and his colleagues into the dark web marketplace (DWM) trade in products related to COVID-19, has revealed the need for the continuous monitoring of dark web marketplaces (DWMs), especially in light of the current shortage and availability of coronavirus vaccines.

Mast cells: Sentinels and high-speed messengers of the immune defense
A team of scientists at the Institute for Molecular and Clinical Immunology at the Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg unravels a crucial mechanism of cell-cell-communication during the defense against pathogens.

U.S. Air Force Academy intervention reduces unwanted sexual contact by over 40 percent
A study led by Dr. Kenneth Griffin of George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services and researchers at National Health Promotion Associates (NHPA) finds that the Cadet Healthy Personal Skills (CHiPS) program shows promise in reducing unwanted sexual contact in military academies.

Researchers from NUS create 'whirling' nano-structures in anti-ferromagnets
Inspired by the Big Bang cooling, the new finding could lead to super-fast, energy-efficient memory chips.

SARS-CoV-2 under the helium ion microscope for the first time
Scientists at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Physics have succeeded for the first time in imaging the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus with a helium ion microscope.

New combination therapy offers chance of healing hepatitis B
Around 260 million people, more than three percent of the global population, are chronically infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV); in the long term, this often leads to complications such as liver cirrhosis and liver cancer.

Harvard scientists use trilayer graphene to observe more robust superconductivity
Harvard scientists report successfully stacking three sheets of graphene and then twisting each of them at a magic angle to produce a three-layered structure that is not only capable of superconductivity but does so more robustly and at higher temperatures than many of the double-stacked graphene.

Studies use mathematics to analyze the semantics of dream reports during the pandemic
Researchers at a center for neuromathematics say dreams reflect the fear and anxiety fueled by the disease.

Battling bugs help solve mysteries of weapon evolution
Scientists at the University of Arizona outfitted bugs with body armor and pitted them against each other in staged wrestling matches, all in the name of science.

NUI Galway demonstrate the promise of precision genomics in cancer treatment
Researchers at NUI Galway have identified genomic signatures in women developing the most common type of breast cancer that can be associated with long-term survival.

Study reveals how air pollution may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease
A new study has found a link between high levels of air pollution at an individual's home address and an elevated risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

Dementia-related psychosis: GSA experts identify ways to improve care
A new white paper from The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) highlights the variety of challenges that persons with dementia-related psychosis and their caregivers have encountered during moves through different health care settings -- and proposes strategies to address these challenges.

Large-area periodic perovskite nanostructures for lenticular printing laser displays
We fabricated large-area periodic structures with spatial resolution at wavelength scale from hybrid perovskite materials via a space-confined solution growth method.

The Lancet Public Health: Weekly testing and two-week isolation most cost-effective strategy to control spread of COVID-19 in high transmission areas, US study suggests
Weekly COVID-19 testing, coupled with a two-week isolation period for positive cases, may be the most cost-effective strategy to tackle the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in the USA when transmission is high until vaccines are widely available, a modelling study published in The Lancet Public Health journal suggests.

Study shows flu vaccine lessens COVID-19 symptoms in children
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered that children who receive a seasonal flu shot are less likely to suffer symptoms from a COVID-19 infection.

School gardens linked with kids eating more vegetables
Getting children to eat their vegetables can seem like an insurmountable task, but nutrition researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have found one way: school gardens and lessons on using what's grown in them.

COVID-19 health threat increases psychological distress among Black Americans
A new University of Georgia study examines the interplay between the perceptions of coronavirus threat and psychological distress among Black Americans.

New study examines addiction medicine treatment in Vietnam
A study published in The Lancet HIV marks one of the first scientifically robust assessments of a new model of treating HIV in lower or middle income countries where injection drug use is a major cause of HIV infection.

Scientists discover ocean 'surface slicks' are nurseries for diverse fishes
Ocean features called surface slicks are an interconnected superhighway of nursery habitat for more than 100 species of fishes from diverse ocean habitats.

Effectiveness of endocrine therapy for breast cancer in men
This randomized clinical trial looked at changes in levels of the hormone estradiol in men with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer after three months of treatment with endocrine therapies.

Spicy perfection isn't to prevent infection
Spicy food is considered an example of ''Darwinian gastronomy'': selection for antimicrobial ingredients to counter infection risk.

Pharmacologist offers plan to solve disparities in designing medicine
In a new perspective piece published in the Feb. 5 issue of Science, Johns Hopkins pharmacologist Namandje Bumpus, Ph.D., outlines the molecular origins for differences in how well certain drugs work among distinct populations.

Using Artificial Intelligence to prevent harm caused by immunotherapy
Until recently, researchers and oncologists had placed these lung cancer patients into two broad categories: those who would benefit from immunotherapy, and those who likely would not.

The strange impact of the first consumer review
If you're about to buy something online and its only customer review is negative, you'd probably reconsider the purchase, right?

Charge radii of exotic potassium isotopes challenge nuclear structure theory
In nuclear physics so-called magic number are such nuclear proton and/or neutron numbers, for which the nucleus is more stable compared to neighboring isotopes on the nuclear chart.

Fast-flying bats rely on late-night updrafts to reach great heights
Although scientists knew that some bats could reach heights of over 1,600 meters (or approximately one mile) above the ground during flight, they didn't understand how they managed to do it without the benefit of thermals that aren't typically available to them during their nighttime forays.

Time management can work but in unexpected ways, according to new research
Concordia University postdoc Brad Aeon and his colleagues Aïda Faber of Université Laval in Quebec City and Alexandra Panaccio, associate professor of management at John Molson, conducted a first-of-its-kind meta-analysis of time management literature.

Surprising new research: We're more like primitive fishes than once believed
People traditionally think that lungs and limbs are key innovations that came with the vertebrate transition from water to land.

In Ethiopia, mother's wealth more protective against child marriage than father's
For a girl in Ethiopia, her mother's wealth can protect her from becoming a child bride - but if a father prefers child marriage, his own wealth may increase the likelihood that she will be married before 18, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study.

Special Issue: Human genome at 20
In February 2001, the first drafts of the human genome were published.

Dual treatments help PTSD and depression
Reducing the severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression - an urgent concern in the era of COVID-19 lockdown and isolation traumas - may benefit from dual treatments rather than a single treatment protocol, according to Flinders University researchers.

Solving chronic pain during intercourse
Women suffering from chronic conditions that result in painful intercourse represent about 10% of females of reproductive age - triggering a combined economic burden of more than $7.7 billion per year - yet scant knowledge about the origins of this pain is preventing an effective way to treat it.

How metal atoms can arrange themselves on an insulator
In order to produce tiny electronic memories or sensors in future, it is essential to be able to arrange individual metal atoms on an insulating layer.

Molecule from nature provides fully recyclable polymers
Plastics are among the most successful materials of modern times.

The proton conduction mechanism in protic ionic liquids
Researchers from Niigata University, Japan along with their collaborators from Tokyo University of Science, Japan, Yamagata University, Japan and University of Regensburg, Germany have reported a marked shift in the hydrogen ion hopping mechanism as a function of acid/alkali index in protic ionic liquids.

New biomarker may predict which pancreatic cancer patients respond to CD40 immunotherapy
Inflammation in the blood could serve as a new biomarker to help identify patients with advanced pancreatic cancer who won't respond to the immune-stimulating drugs known as CD40 agonists, suggests a new study from researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania published in JCI Insight.

Help for borderline personality disorder
Borderline Personality Disorder, or BPD, is the most common personality disorder in Australia, affecting up to 5% of the population at some stage, and Flinders University researchers warn more needs to be done to meet this high consumer needs.

Horse remains reveal new insights into how Native peoples raised horses
When a Utah couple dug up the remains of a horse near the city of Provo, researchers suspected that they may have discovered an animal that lived during the last Ice Age.

Best of both worlds: A hybrid method for tracking laparoscopic ultrasound transducers
In a recent study published in the Journal of Medical Imaging, a team of scientists from the US have come up with a creative solution.

Some sperms poison their competitors
A genetic factor helps sperm cells outcompete their peers

Scientists establish multiple primate models of SARS-CoV-2 airborne infection
Army scientists evaluated three nonhuman primate species as potential models of SARS-CoV-2 airborne infection, according to results published online this week in PLOS ONE. Their work demonstrates that any of these species may be useful for testing vaccines and therapies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has resulted in over 104 million cases and more than 2 million deaths worldwide in the past year.

Povidone iodine mouthwash, gargle, nasal spray to reduce nasopharyngeal viral load in patients with COVID-19
Researchers in this randomized clinical trial investigated whether nasopharyngeal application of povidone iodine could reduce the viral load of patients with nonsevere COVID-19 symptoms.

Role of cell cycle on analyzing telomerase activity with a fluorescence off-on system
Traditional detecting techniques for telomerase activity are mainly based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based classic telomeric repeat amplification protocols (TRAPs) and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR).

In symbiosis: Plants control the genetics of microbes
Researchers from the University of Ottawa have discovered that plants may be able to control the genetics of their intimate root symbionts - the organism with which they live in symbiosis - thereby providing a better understanding of their growth.

Imaging the first moments of a body plan emerging in the embryo
Egg cells start out as round blobs. After fertilization, they begin transforming into people, dogs, fish, or other animals by orienting head to tail, back to belly, and left to right.

A single-molecule guide to understanding chemical reactions better
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) report measurement of electrical conductivity of single DNA molecules as a way of monitoring the formation of double-stranded DNA on a gold surface.

DNA-based technique allows researchers to determine age of living beluga whales in Alaska
Researchers can now determine the age and sex of living beluga whales in Alaska's Cook Inlet thanks to a new DNA-based technique that uses information from small samples of skin tissue.

Iodine oxoacids drive rapid aerosol formation in pristine atmospheric areas
Iodine plays a bigger role than thought in rapid new particle formation (NPF) in relatively pristine regions of the atmosphere, such as along marine coasts, in the Arctic boundary layer or in the upper free troposphere, according to a new study.

'Audeo' teaches artificial intelligence to play the piano
A University of Washington team created Audeo, a system that can generate music using only visual cues of someone playing the piano.

Dialysis patients have 4-fold greater risk of dying from COVID-19
People undergoing long-term dialysis are almost 4 times more likely to die from COVID-19 and should be prioritized for vaccination, found a new Ontario study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Human-elephant conflict in Kenya heightens with increase in crop-raiding
A new study led by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) has found that elephants living around the world-famous Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, are crop-raiding closer to the protected area, more frequently and throughout the year but are causing less damage when doing so.

CU offers plan for improving mental health care for resident physicians
A pilot program to offer mental health services offered resident physicians at the University of Colorado School of Medicine provides a model for confidential and affordable help, according to an article published today by the journal Academic Medicine.

Unusual 2019-2020 flu season linked to more transmissible strain
The 2019-2020 flu season in the U.S. was unusual in a number of ways.

In a desert seared by climate change, burrowers fare better than birds
In the Mojave Desert, small mammals are weathering the hotter conditions triggered by climate change much better than birds, finds a new study in Science.

Experimental vaccine blunts the deadliest of synthetic opioids
As the opioid epidemic raged on with an even greater force during COVID-19, the Scripps Research laboratory of chemist Kim Janda, PhD, has been working on new therapeutic interventions that may be able to prevent the bulk of deaths from opioid overdose.

Switching nanolight on and off
The report demonstrates a new method to control the flow of light of nanolight.

Adolescent involvement with firearms linked to gun violence in adulthood
A new study by Northwestern University researchers finds involvement with firearms by high-risk youth is associated with firearm violence during adulthood.

Mysterious organic scum boosts chemical reaction efficiency, may reduce chemical waste
Chemical manufacturers frequently use toxic solvents such as alcohols and benzene to make products like pharmaceuticals and plastics.

Garlic and selenium increase stress resistance in carps, says a RUDN University biologist
A biologist from RUDN University confirmed that selenium nanoparticles and garlic extract can effectively reduce the negative impact of stress on the health of grass carp in the breeding industry.

Synthesized very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids improved retinal function in mice
A University of Utah ophthalmologist is investigating how lipids known as VLC-PUFAs could be used to prevent eye disease thanks to a new way to synthesize them for research.

Duration of antibody response varies among adults naturally reinfected with RSV
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine found that while most individuals responded to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) natural reinfection with a typical sustained antibody response associated with protection, a few individuals surprisingly responded atypically, not being able to sustain the antibody response, which declined to levels that made the individuals susceptible to RSV reinfection.

Imaging of a living brain can help clearly differentiate between two types of dementia
Scientists in Portugal and the United Kingdom were able to confirm that an imaging technique that traces neuronal dopaminergic deficiency in the brain is able to differentiate, in vivo, Alzheimer's disease from the lesser-known dementia with Lewy bodies.

Factors, rate of nurse burnout in US
Researchers estimated the rate of nurse burnout in the United States and the factors associated with leaving or considering leaving their jobs due to burnout.

An optical coating like no other
The technology, based on Fano resonance, results in a coating that fully reflects only a very narrow wavelength.

Ensuring healthy family mealtimes is important - and complicated
Mealtimes are a central aspect of family life, affecting the health and wellbeing of both children and adults.

How blood and lymph vessels remain separated after development
Researchers in Japan have clarified the mechanism by which blood and lymphatic vessels remain separated after development.

Student astronomer finds galactic missing matter
Half of the universe's matter is 'missing', but PhD student Yuanming Wang has developed an ingenious method to help track it down.

Dartmouth-invented technology allows doctors to see beam field during radiation treatment
With the use of the BeamSite Cherenkov imaging camera system invented by DoseOptics, LLC., radiation oncologists at Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center can capture real-time external beam delivery images during cancer patients' standard radiation therapy sessions.

Scientists extract pigments from algae for food supplements
In the framework of the Chlorella microalgae cultivation process, the researchers obtained microalgae biomass with a high content of carotenoid pigments, which is suitable for the food industry through targeted cultivation.

UTA engineers develop programming technology to transform 2D materials into 3D shapes
University of Texas at Arlington researchers have developed a technique that programs 2D materials to transform into complex 3D shapes.
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