Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

February 08, 2021
Front-of-package product names and ingredient lists of infant and toddler food can be hard to navigate
Early exposure to nutritious foods may help children develop more healthful eating habits, but package labels can make it difficult for parents to understand what they are feeding their young children, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier.

Use of goldenseal may compromise glucose control in diabetics on metformin
Diabetic patients taking the natural product goldenseal while taking the prescription drug metformin may be unwittingly sabotaging their efforts to maintain healthy blood glucose levels.

Cannabis reduces blood pressure in older adults, according to Ben-Gurion University researchers
''Older adults are the fastest growing group of medical cannabis users, yet evidence on cardiovascular safety for this population is scarce,'' says Dr.

Survey: Most Americans say they'll continue health precautions after COVID-19
A new national survey of more than 2,000 Americans by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds most plan to continue many of the pandemic precautions in the name of public health, even when the pandemic is over.

Study: Reducing biases about autism may increase social inclusion
Psychology researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas hope to improve the social success of autistic adolescents and adults by promoting understanding and acceptance of autism among non-autistic people instead of focusing on teaching them ways to think and behave more like their non-autistic peers.

Monitoring precious groundwater resources for arid agricultural regions
A pioneering framework will monitor groundwater use for agricultural irrigation across Saudi Arabia.

Can the brain resist the group opinion?
Scientists at HSE University have learned that disagreeing with the opinion of other people leaves a 'trace' in brain activity, which allows the brain to later adjust its opinion in favour of the majority-held point of view.

NTUsg researchers develop flexible piezoelectric crystal
A team of researchers led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has developed a new material, that when electricity is applied to it, can flex and bend forty times more than other materials in the same class, opening the way to better micro machines.

Scientists create armour for fragile quantum technology
An ANU-led international team has invented the equivalent of 'body armour' for extremely fragile quantum systems, which will make them robust enough to be used as the basis for a new generation of low-energy electronics.

Molecular sleuthing identifies and corrects major flaws in blood-brain barrier model
A type of cell derived from human stem cells that has been widely used for brain research and drug development may have been leading researchers astray for years, according to a study from scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine and Columbia University Irving Medical Center.

Rapid, reliable on-site drug detection using wearable sensor
Researchers in South Korea have successfully developed a wearable sensor that can detect illegal drugs in sweat by using nanomaterials technology that amplify the optical signal of narcotics to a flexible, body-worn material.

Outpatient dietary management of electrolyte disorders during COVID-19
In this essay, the authors describe a 97-year-old patient who learned to titrate condensed chicken soup like a medicine during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Higher blood pressure over life span increases congestive heart failure risk in Black people
Starting with early childhood, otherwise healthy Black people show signs of slightly diminished heart muscle strength and a slightly higher blood pressure than their white counterparts, factors which may put them on a course for early development of congestive heart failure, Medical College of Georgia researchers report.

Efficiency limits of next-generation hybrid photovoltaic-thermal solar technology
Spectral-splitting hybrid photovoltaic-thermal (SSPVT) technology has emerged as a promising route toward high-performance solar harvesting.

Online searches can help foreshadow future COVID-19 surges and declines, new study shows
Online searches for mobile and isolated activities can help to predict later surges and declines in COVID-19 cases, a team of researchers has found.

Joint radionuclide therapy-immunotherapy approach effective in prostate cancer model
A combination of radionuclide therapy and immunotherapy has proven successful in slowing the progression of prostate cancer and increasing survival time, according to new research published in the February issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

Bernese researchers create sophisticated lung-on-chip
In collaboration with clinical partners from the Inselspital, researchers from the ARTORG Center for Biomedical Research of the University of Bern have developed a second-generation lung-on-chip model with life-size dimension alveoli in a stretchable membrane, made of purely biological material.

79% decrease in primary care visits, 56-fold increase in virtual care: COVID-19 pandemic
In the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was an almost 80% decrease in primary care office visits in Ontario and a 56-fold increase in virtual visits, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Identification of three genes that determine the stemness of gastric tissue stem cells
Tissue stem cells can self-renew and differentiate, supplying cells necessary for tissues at various developmental stages.

Deepfake detectors can be defeated, computer scientists show for the first time
Systems designed to detect deepfakes --videos that manipulate real-life footage via artificial intelligence--can be deceived, computer scientists showed for the first time at the WACV 2021 conference which took place online Jan.

Recognizing liars from the sound of their voice?
French scientists have conducted a series of experiments to understand how we decide, based on the voice, whether a speaker is honest and confident, or on the contrary dishonest and uncertain.

Coal and COVID-19: How the pandemic is accelerating the end of fossil power generation
COVID-19 has not only caused a temporary drop in global CO2 emissions, it has also reduced the share of power generated by burning coal - a trend that could in fact outlast the pandemic.

Half of global wastewater treated, rates in developing countries still lagging
A new study by scientists at Utrecht University and the United Nations University concludes that about half of global wastewater is treated, rather than the previous estimate of 20%.

Proton pump inhibitor use by children, risk of asthma
Researchers investigated the association between the use of proton pump inhibitors among children and adolescents in Sweden and the risk of asthma.

Halt cell recycling to treat cancer
Targeting and changing autophagy, otherwise known as cell recycling, has been linked to helping control or diminish certain cancers.

New clues to how SARS-CoV-2 infects cells
The molecular details of how SARS-CoV-2 enters cells and infects them are still not clear.

Radiative cooling and solar heating from one system, no electricity needed
A University at Buffalo-led study published Feb. 8 in the journal Cell Reports Physical Science describes a new technology that provides both radiative cooling and solar heating, all is one system and without using electricity or fuel.

Scientists switch on tissue repair in inflammatory bowel disease
Researchers have developed a method that instructs immune system cells to help repair damaged tissue in the intestine.

Study describes the diversity of genetic changes that cause inherited kidney disease
A study has described genetic changes in patients with the most common form of hereditary kidney disease that affects an estimated 12.5 million people worldwide.

Popular tool for measuring child feeding practices validated by RIT researcher
A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher has validated a tool measuring adherence to a popular child feeding approach used by pediatricians, nutritionists, social workers and child psychologists to assess parents' feeding practices and prevent feeding problems.

Better understanding the reasons behind Arctic amplified warming
EPFL professor Julia Schmale is calling on scientists to conduct dedicated process studies and to share their data and research findings on Arctic warming.

Researchers develop platform to identify cancer mutations that may be responsive to drug therapies
A Cleveland Clinic-led team of researchers has developed a personalized genomic medicine platform that will help advance accelerate genomic medicine research and genome-informed drug discovery, according to new study results published recently in Genome Biology.

Study of supergiant star Betelgeuse unveils the cause of its pulsations
Betelgeuse is normally one of the brightest, most recognizable stars of the winter sky, marking the left shoulder of the constellation Orion.

The genetic susceptibility of people with Down's syndrome to COVID-19
A study reveals the genetic factors that may expose or protect people with Down syndrome from SARS-CoV-2.

Two-phase material with surprising properties
Some materials can couple electrical and mechanical properties - this can lead to astonishing effects: New materials have been developed, consisting of both crystalline and amorphous regions.

STINGing tumors with nanoparticles
DALLAS - Feb. 8, 2021 - A new nanoparticle-based drug can boost the body's innate immune system and make it more effective at fighting off tumors, researchers at UT Southwestern have shown.

Synthetic protein quality control system in bacteria
Synthetic protein quality control system in bacteria.

'Magnetic graphene' forms a new kind of magnetism
Researchers have identified a new form of magnetism in so-called magnetic graphene, which could point the way toward understanding superconductivity in this unusual type of material.

Insights into lithium metal battery failure open doors to doubling battery life
Researchers led by Prof. CUI Guanglei from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have identified what causes lithium metal batteries (LMBs) to ''self-destruct'' and proposed a way to prevent it.

Researchers produce tiny nanoparticles and reveal their inner structure for the first time
Tiny nanoparticles can be furnished with dyes and could be used for new imaging techniques, as chemists and physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) show in a recent study.

"Prediabetes" diagnosis less useful in older patients
Older adults who are classified as having ''prediabetes'' due to moderately elevated measures of blood sugar usually don't go on to develop full-blown diabetes.

Tourism mainly responsible for marine litter on Mediterranean beaches
A study by the ICTA-UAB warns that tourism generates 80% of the marine litter accumulating on the beaches of the Mediterranean islands in summer.

Assessment of SARS-CoV-2 and risk factors associated with COVID-19 among outpatients in Virginia
Researchers assessed what percentage of the Virginia population had been exposed to SARS-CoV-2 after the first wave of COVID-19 infections in the U.S.

UMass Amherst researchers gain insight into the biology of a deadly fungus
Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have gained new insight into the biological processes of a chytrid fungus responsible for a deadly skin infection devastating frog populations worldwide.

Study links exposure to nighttime artificial lights with elevated thyroid cancer risk
People living in regions with high levels of outdoor artificial light at night may face a higher risk of developing thyroid cancer.

Winner-takes-all synthetic gene circuit process opens new pathways to disease treatment
Multicellular synthetic circuits will be a much more effective way to treat cancer.

Understanding catalytic couplings: not all synergies are simple
Negishi cross-coupling reactions have been widely used to form C-C bonds since the 1970s and are often perceived as the result of two metals (i.e zinc and palladium/nickel) working in synergy.

New synthetic route for biofuel production
A German-Chinese research team has found a new synthetic route to produce biofuel from biomass.

Some types of coronavirus steal the hosts' genes to elude their immune system
Researchers discovered this while analysing pathogens found in European hedgehogs that present the same strain of Beta-CoV responsible for both COVID-19 and MERS but without evidence of human transmissibility.

Type 2 diabetes: drugs initially increase glucose production
Although SGLT-2 inhibitors are central to the treatment of diabetes, their exact mode of action was hitherto unknown.

An end to invasive biopsies?
Hebrew Unievrsity researchers have found a less invasive and more accurate options for diagnoses using a simple blood test that detects DNA fragments.

A magnetic twist to graphene
By combining ferromagnets and two rotated layers of graphene, researchers open up a new platform for strongly interacting states using graphene's unique quantum degree of freedom.

Ophiura from Russky Island might make photodynamic therapy more affordable
An unusual biologically active porphyrin compound was isolated from seabed dweller Ophiura sarsii.

The quantum advantage: a novel demonstration
Scientists have just proved that a quantum machine can perform a given verification task in seconds when the same exercise would take a time equivalent to the age of the universe for a conventional computer.

Cells are collective thinkers
Cells, like humans, cast votes to make decisions as a group.

Uncovering how some corals resist bleaching
Colorful coral reefs have suffered from ''bleaching'' due to climate change, but researchers from University of Hawaii and Michigan State University joined forces to uncover why some were resistant to this effect in the hopes to preserve these oceanic wonders.

Higher blood pressure at night than in daytime may increase Alzheimer's disease risk
Higher blood pressure at night than in daytime may be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease in older men.

Silicon waveguides move us closer to faster, light-based logic circuits
IBM researchers have succeeded in guiding visible light through a silicon wire efficiently, an important milestone in the exploration towards a new breed of faster, more efficient logic circuits.

Rare blast's remains discovered in Milky Way's center
Astronomers may have found our Galaxy's first example of an unusual kind of stellar explosion.

Higher excess COVID-19 death risk in middle-aged people with type 2 diabetes
A largescale analysis led by the University of Exeter and funded by Diabetes UK, has found a disproportionately higher COVID-19 death risk in middle-aged people with type 2 diabetes, raising questions over vaccination strategies across Europe.

High CO2 to slow tropical fish move to cooler waters
A new study from the University of Adelaide, published in Nature Climate Change, shows that the ocean acidification predicted under continuing high CO2 emissions may make cooler, temperate waters less welcoming.

Marmoset monkeys have personalities too
An international team of behavioral biologists from Austria, Brazil and the Netherlands, with Vedrana Å lipogor from the University of Vienna as leading author of the study, designed a set of tasks to assess personality of common marmosets.

Machine learning could aid mental health diagnoses
A way of using machine learning to more accurately identify patients with a mix of psychotic and depressive symptoms has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham.

Study identifies 'post-traumatic growth' emerging from COVID-19 lockdowns
A new study suggests that despite considerable adversity, many people have also experienced positive effects in lockdown as a result of a less frenetic life.

'Multiplying' light could be key to ultra-powerful optical computers
New type of optical computing could solve highly complex problems that are out of reach for even the most powerful supercomputers.

Happiness really does come for free
Economic growth is often prescribed as a way of increasing the well-being of people in low-income countries.

Lockdown linked to drop in asthma attacks, GP data suggests
Asthma attack rates seen at GP surgeries in England fell significantly during the first Covid-19 pandemic lockdown of 2020, a study suggests.

A billion years in 40 seconds: video reveals our dynamic planet
New research has allowed geoscientists to show the uninterrupted movement of Earth's tectonic plates over the past billion years.

What rules govern the structure of membraneless organelles?
A study published on Feb. 8 in Nature Communications explores how membraneless organelles (MLOs) or biomolecular condensates, form and organize themselves.

Brain changed by caffeine in utero, study finds
New research finds caffeine consumed during pregnancy can change important brain pathways that could lead to behavioral problems later in life.

Geisinger researchers find AI can predict death risk
Researchers at Geisinger have found that a computer algorithm developed using echocardiogram videos of the heart can predict mortality within a year.

3D-printed spectrometer on a 100 x100 μm² footprint
The miniaturisation of spectroscopic measurement devices opens novel information channels in medical science or consumer electronics.

Does Goal 7 Energy for All need a rethink?
Goal 7 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aims to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all by 2030.

Risk of progression to diabetes among older adults with prediabetes
This observational study compared different measures of prediabetes and the risk of progression to diabetes among adults age 71 to 90.

Brain protein that causes Alzheimer's also protects against the disease: USask research
Findings from a new study on Alzheimer's disease (AD), led by researchers at the University of Saskatchewan (USask), could eventually help clinicians identify people at highest risk for developing the irreversible, progressive brain disorder and pave the way for treatments that slow or prevent its onset.

Mixed and matched: Integrating metal-organic frameworks into polymers for CO2 separation
Polymer matrices can be combined with metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to enhance their performance for CO2 separation.

Distinctness of mental disorders traced to differences in gene readouts
A new study suggests that differences in the expression of gene transcripts - readouts copied from DNA that help maintain and build our cells - may hold the key to understanding how mental disorders with shared genetic risk factors result in different patterns of onset, symptoms, course of illness, and treatment responses.

An interdecadal decrease in extreme heat days in August over Northeast China around the early 1990s
An interdecadal decrease in extreme heat days in August over Northeast China around the early 1990s.

Meet the Smurfs: A bone metabolism family
Researchers from Osaka University and Ehime University have found that protein Smurf2 can regulate a cellular pathway that affects bone metabolism.

Climate change: Erratic weather slows down the economy
If temperature varies strongly from day to day, the economy grows less.

Examining association between percentage of women in medical specialties, salaries
Salary information from faculty at U.S. medical schools was used to examine the association between the percentage of female clinicians in a medical specialty and the average and median salaries for that specialty.

Tiny crustacean redefines ultra-fast movement
Just the size of a sunflower seed, the amphipod Dulichiella cf. appendiculata wields a giant claw that snaps shut 10,000 times faster than the blink of a human eye.

How humans can build better teamwork with robots
Nancy Cooke is a cognitive psychologist and professor of human systems engineering at the Polytechnic School at Arizona State University (ASU).

How rocks rusted on Earth and turned red
How did rocks rust on Earth and turn red? A Rutgers-led study has shed new light on the important phenomenon and will help address questions about the Late Triassic climate more than 200 million years ago, when greenhouse gas levels were high enough to be a model for what our planet may be like in the future.

Hearing acrobatics
The sense of hearing is, quite literally, a molecular tightrope act.

HIV: an innovative therapeutic breakthrough to optimize the immune system
Prompted by the need to improve conventional treatments for people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), a team from the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has identified a therapeutic approach to restore the effectiveness of immune cells.

Correspondence between representations in visual cortices and neural networks
A research group led by Nobuhiko Wagatsuma, Lecturer at Toho University, Akinori Hidaka, Associate Professor at Tokyo Denki University, and Hiroshi Tamura, Associate Professor at Osaka University, found that the neural network structure of attention prediction, based on deep learning used in the development of artificial intelligence, has similar characteristics to the cerebral mechanism of primates.

HKBU and CUHK launch Spermine Risk Score for prostate cancer diagnosis
Researchers from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) and the Faculty of Medicine at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CU Medicine) have jointly developed the Spermine Risk Score which, coupled with the use of a urine test, provides a non-invasive and more reliable method for the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

As you look around, mental images bounce between right and left brain
A new study in Neuron explains how the brain helps us remember what we've seen, even as it shifts around in our visual system.

Neural roots/origins of alcoholism identified by British and Chinese researchers
The physical origin of alcohol addiction has been located in a network of the human brain that regulates our response to danger, according to a team of British and Chinese researchers, co-led by the University of Warwick, the University of Cambridge, and Fudan University in Shanghai.

Immune response to insulin could identify, help treat those at risk for Type 1 Diabetes
Researchers from the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that immune responses to insulin could help identify individuals most at risk for developing Type 1 diabetes.

New method developed for 'up-sizing' mini organs used in medical research
A team of engineers and scientists has developed a method of 'multiplying' organoids: miniature collections of cells that mimic the behaviour of various organs and are promising tools for the study of human biology and disease.

Researchers develop data tool that may improve care
With the aid of sophisticated machine learning, researchers at UPMC and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine demonstrated that a tool they developed can rapidly predict mortality for patients facing transfer between hospitals in order to access higher-acuity care.

Variable weather makes weeds harder to whack
From flooded spring fields to summer hailstorms and drought, farmers are well aware the weather is changing.

Man-made borders threaten wildlife as climate changes
Walls and fences designed to secure national borders could make it difficult for almost 700 mammal species to adapt to climate change, according to new research.

Scientists discover how a group of caterpillars became poisonous
The Atala butterfly and its five closest relatives in the genus Eumaeus like to display their toxicity.

Iodine oxoacids formed in oceans have major impact on climate
Molecular iodine, a major emission from the ocean, can quickly convert to iodic oxoacids even under weak daylight conditions.

Severe undercounting of COVID-19 cases in U.S., other countries estimated via model
A new machine-learning framework uses reported test results and death rates to calculate estimates of the actual number of current COVID-19 infections within all 50 U.S. states and 50 countries.

Mount Sinai study finds wearable devices can detect COVID-19 symptoms and predict diagnosis
Wearable devices can identify COVID-19 cases earlier than traditional diagnostic methods and can help track and improve management of the disease, according to a Mount Sinai study.

Fetal surgery for spina bifida leads to better mobility in school-age children
Adding to a growing body of research affirming the benefits of fetal surgery for spina bifida, new findings show prenatal repair of the spinal column confers physical gains that extend into childhood.

Cleaning Up the Mississippi River
Professor R. Eugene Turner reconstructed a 100-year record chronicling water quality trends in the lower Mississippi River by compiling water quality data collected from 1901 to 2019.

What happens in the mouth ... doesn't stay in the mouth
The healthy human oral microbiome consists of not just clean teeth and firm gums, but also energy-efficient bacteria living in an environment rich in blood vessels that enables the organisms' constant communication with immune-system cells and proteins.

Northwestern researcher to discuss consequences of incarceration at AAAS annual meeting
Teplin will moderate the scientific session ''Consequences of Incarceration on Health Inequity and Racial Injustice'' at 2 p.m.

3D printing polymers
Researchers in the labs of Christopher Bates, an assistant professor of materials at UC Santa Barbara, and Michael Chabinyc, a professor of materials and chair of the department, have teamed to develop the first 3D-printable ''bottlebrush'' elastomer.

Analysis confirms racial disparities in COVID-19 infection
An analysis of Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California early in the COVID-19 pandemic found racial and ethnic disparities in the likelihood of testing positive for the coronavirus, but no significant disparities in mortality among those who were hospitalized.

Richness of plant species reduces the number of viral infections in meadows
A new study indicates that agricultural activity confuses the mechanisms that regulate the occurrence of plant diseases in nature.

Comparison of demand for drugs for COVID-19 treatment, other drugs early in pandemic in Italy
The National Health Service in Italy provides universal coverage to citizens but because no approved drug was available for COVID-19, patients received potentially effective drugs, participated in clinical trials, accessed compassionate drug use programs or self-medicated.

New timeline of deadliest California wildfire could guide lifesaving research and action
What made the Camp Fire so devastating? And what lessons can we learn to prevent another disaster of this scale?

Combined bark beetle outbreaks and wildfire spell uncertain future for forests
Bark beetle outbreaks and wildfire alone are not a death sentence for Colorado's beloved forests--but when combined, their toll may become more permanent, shows new research from the University of Colorado Boulder.

Auditory brainstem pathways do not develop properly without microglia
Auditory pathways in the brainstem do not fully mature without microglia clearing away extra cell connections.

New drug target for Ebola, Marburg viruses
Researchers have identified a previously unknown site on the filovirus glycoprotein to which small drug molecules can bind and prevent infection -- blocking both sites may be a more effective treatment while reducing the risk of side effects.

Addressing breastfeeding disparities for African American mothers
An abundance of data underscore the importance of breastfeeding and human milk for the optimal health of infants, children, mothers, and society.

Role of aspirating system type in SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity among dental staff
High-volume aspirators are recommended in dental clinics during the COVID-19 pandemic, but a new study published in the JDR Clinical & Translational Research, shows that the type of aspirating system significantly affects the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection among dental specialists

Captive-bred juvenile salmon unlikely to become migratory when released into streams
Researchers at the Kobe University Graduate School of Science have revealed that when captive-bred juvenile red-spotted masu salmon are released into natural streams, very few individuals become migrants.

These shrimplike crustaceans are the fastest snappers in the sea
The snapping claws of male amphipods--tiny, shrimplike crustaceans--are among the fastest and most energetic of any life on Earth.

Potential for misuse of climate data a threat to business and financial markets
Climate information is at risk of being misconstrued and used inappropriately in financial reports and has the potential to expose businesses to significant risk, according to a new paper by Australian researchers.

The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence study in daycare centres in France suggests low rates of infection in very young children
Research assessing seroprevalence in daycare centres that remained open during the first national lockdown in France, suggests that the rate of SARS-CoV-2 virus infection was low at 3.7%, with positive cases likely infected by an adult in their household, rather than whilst at daycare.

Food waste researcher: We must learn that brown fruit isn't bad fruit
We tend to avoid choosing apples with brown spots, assuming that they taste bad.

Ditching the car for walking or biking just one day a week cuts carbon footprint
Swapping the car for walking, cycling and e-biking even just one day a week makes a significant impact on personal carbon emissions in cities.

AI researchers ask: What's going on inside the black box?
Brain-like artificial networks are often referred to as a ''black box'' because researchers do not know how they learn and make predictions.

Death by suicide? Drug overdoses muddy waters for investigators, amplify mental health crisis
A new West Virginia University-led injury mortality study combines most drug overdose deaths with all suicides into an expanded self-injury category.

1918 pandemic second wave had fatal consequences
In the event of a pandemic, delayed reactions and a decentralized approach by the authorities at the start of a follow-up wave can lead to longer-lasting, more severe and more fatal consequences, researchers from the universities of Zurich and Toronto have found.

History of vaccines offers lessons on COVID-19 for pregnant women
DALLAS - Feb. 8, 2021 - Pregnant women, who are at increased risk of preterm birth or pregnancy loss if they develop a severe case of COVID-19, need the best possible guidance on whether they should receive a COVID-19 vaccine, according to an article by two UT Southwestern obstetricians published today in JAMA. That guidance can take lessons from what is already known about other vaccines given during pregnancy.

Synchronization of brain hemispheres changes what we hear
Most of the time, our brain receives different input from each of our ears, but we nevertheless perceive speech as unified sounds.

Microbiota transfer therapy for autism: Multi-omic approaches and lessons learned
Recent studies in mice and humans have revealed intriguing links between the composition of gut microbiota and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), a disease believed to affect one in 54 children, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Take-at-home tests boost colorectal cancer screening 10x for the underserved
By making it the default to send colorectal cancer screening tests to patients' homes unless they opted out via text message, screening rates increased by more than 1,000 percent

WVU biologists uncover forests' unexpected role in climate change
New research from West Virginia University biologists shows that trees around the world are consuming more carbon dioxide than previously reported, making forests even more important in regulating the Earth's atmosphere and forever shift how we think about climate change.

Robots sense human touch using camera and shadows
Cornell University researchers have created a low-cost method for soft, deformable robots to detect a range of physical interactions, from pats to punches to hugs, without relying on touch at all.

MSK researchers learn what's driving 'brain fog' in people with COVID-19
A unique collaboration among experts from several areas within MSK leads to findings about how inflammation appears to be driving the neurologic effects seen in some COVID-19 patients.

In-depth analysis identifies causes and mitigation efforts in COVID-19 cluster
As part of the response to the cluster, Brigham researchers also conducted a case-control study and whole-genome sequencing to identify factors that may have been involved in the virus's spread as well as the most likely chain of transmission.

Odds of leaving military double after sexual assault, report finds
New RAND Research Examines the Effects of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment on Separation from the U.S.

All in the head? Brains adapt to support new species
Scientists studying forest dwelling butterflies in Central and South America have discovered that changes in the way animals perceive and process information from their environment can support the emergence of new species.

COVID-19 infections in the U.S. nearly three times greater than reported, model estimates
DALLAS - Feb. 8, 2021 - World health experts have long suspected that the incidence of COVID-19 has been higher than reported.

Findings of study comparing analgesics in acute post-trauma pain
The combination of a high?dose NSAID with paracetamol does not increase the analgesic effect compared to paracetamol alone.

10-year study shows elevated suicide risk from excess social media time for teen girls
In the longest study to date on the effects of social media on teens, BYU research found a correlation between time spent on social media and suicidality risk among teenage girls.
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