Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

February 09, 2021
Experiment shows how our visual system avoids overloading
Russian researchers from HSE University have studied a hypothesis regarding the capability of the visual system to automatically categorize objects (i.e., without requiring attention span).

Poorer mental health smolders after deadly, devastating wildfire
UC San Diego researchers report that climate change is a chronic mental health stressor, and promotes a variety of mental health problems.

Program led by health coaches at primary care clinics helped reduce heart risk
Patients who participated in a two-year, lifestyle intervention / weight-loss program with health coaches improved blood sugar and cholesterol levels.

Commodity farming accelerating climate change in the Amazon rainforest
Researchers report that large-scale commercial farms on deforested land in the southern Amazon result in higher temperature increases and less rainfall than small-scale farms

Coffee lovers, rejoice! Drinking more coffee associated with decreased heart failure risk
nalysis of three large, well-known heart disease studies found drinking one or more cups of caffeinated coffee was associated with decreased heart failure risk.

New study finds climate change shrinks and shifts juvenile white shark range
Unprecedented sightings of juvenile white sharks at the northern end of Monterey Bay signal a significant shift in the young white sharks' range.

New "molecular" tool helps shed light on individual synapses in brain cells
Optogenetics, or genetically engineering neurons to respond to light, is an important technique for studying how neurons work.

Clear-sky detection methods in a highly polluted region still need further improvements
Clear-sky detection methods in a highly polluted region still need further improvements.

Inhibition of the BAF complex causes rapid loss of DNA accessibility
When human cells have to adapt, the BAF complex plays a central role because it controls the accessibility of the DNA and thus the information stored in it.

Evidence for routine brain tumor imaging is murky, but research can shed light
After treatment, medical staff use routine brain scans to monitor progress in brain tumor patients.

Researchers use hot nano-chisel to create artificial bones in a Petri dish
In research in the journal Advanced Functional Materials, a team at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering and New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute (NYSF) detail a system allowing them to sculpt, in a biocompatible material, the exact structure of the bone tissue, with features smaller than the size of a single protein -- a billion times smaller than a meter.

Samara Polytech scientists proved the anti-cancer properties of a number of plant extracts
The composition of some extracts obtained from plant raw materials was studied at Samara Polytech, and their anticarcinogenic and antioxidant properties were assessed.

Researchers uncover hidden hunting tactics of wolves in Minnesota's Northwoods
In a new paper published in the journal Behavioral Ecology, researchers from the University of Minnesota and the Voyageurs Wolf Project--which studies wolves in the Greater Voyageurs Ecosystem in the northwoods of Minnesota--show that wolves have evolved ambush hunting tactics specifically tailored for catching and killing beavers.

How has Covid-19 affected the treatment of osteoporosis?
A global survey of healthcare providers by IOF, NOF and ESCEO has revealed unprecedented effects of the Covid-19 pandemic on worldwide healthcare delivery for osteoporosis.

Reimbursing hospitals for postpartum contraception could prevent unintended pregnancies
Researchers at Brown found that expanding access to long-acting reversible contraception methods, such as IUDs and implants, could give adolescents more agency in choosing whether and when to become pregnant again.

Nitrate in maternal drinking water may impair fetal growth
Women whose household drinking water contained nitrate had babies that weighed, on average, 10 grams less than babies born to mothers where household water had no detectible nitrate, according to a new study.

New factor in the carbon cycle of the Southern Ocean identified
The Southern Ocean is one of the key regions for understanding the climate system.

Traumatic stress in childhood can lead to brain changes in adulthood: study
A new study has shown that traumatic or stressful events in childhood may lead to tiny changes in key brain structures that can now be identified decades later.

A 'skeletal age' calculator to predict bone fracture risk
Garvan researchers have developed a model to predict the biological age of bones that may improve the management of osteoporotic fractures.

Color is in the eye of the beholder
Researchers led by Harvard University develop a novel method to express long wavelength invertebrate opsin proteins in vitro and detail the molecular structure of long- and short-wavelengths in the opsins of the lycaenid butterfly, Eumaeus atala, discovering previously unknown opsins that result in red-shifted long wavelength sensitivity in their visual system.

Peanut allergy affects even more U.S. adults than children
Peanut allergy affects at least 4.5 million adults in the U.S., many of whom report developing their first allergy symptoms during adulthood.

Bats & pangolins in Southeast Asia harbour SARS-CoV-2-related coronaviruses, reveals new study
A new study led by scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, and Chulalongkorn University, Thailand, shows that SARS-CoV-2-related coronaviruses (SC2r-CoVs) are circulating in animals as far away as Thailand.

Arctic permafrost releases more CO2 than once believed
There may be greater CO2 emissions associated with thawing Arctic permafrost than ever imagined.

Radiation vulnerability
Exposure to radiation can wreak indiscriminate havoc on cells, tissues, and organs.

Long-term environmental damage from transportation projects in Kenya, scientists warn
The construction of a major railway through Kenya will have long-term environmental impacts on the area, suggesting more work needs to be done to limit the damage on future infrastructure projects, a major study reveals.

Limiting warming to 2 C requires emissions reductions 80% above Paris Agreement targets
Even if all countries meet their Paris Agreement goals for reducing emissions, Earth has only a 5% chance of staying below 2 C warming this century, a 2017 study showed.

Notes of discomfort: Study keys in on trends in marching band members' pain
Marching band members in leadership roles are more likely to feel discomfort in the neck and upper back than their less experienced bandmates, who in turn are more susceptible to left-hand pain and cognitive strain, a new study suggests.

New insights put a freeze on the mechanisms for safely cryopreserving biological materials
The ability to freeze cells and even whole organs without damaging them, known as cryoprotection, is of considerable interest to medical practitioners, and scientists have experimented with chemicals called polyampholytes as cryoprotectants.

Vaccine confidence grows under new administration, latest CUNY SPH Survey reveals
Under the Biden Administration, New Yorkers' acceptance of the Covid-19 vaccine has increased significantly.

Paid maternity leave has long-term health benefits
A study of women who were new mothers in the late 1970s found that those who were given longer, paid maternity leave lived healthier lives as they entered middle age.

Researchers identify a new molecular mechanism related to severe anaphylaxis
In a study led by researchers of the University of Barcelona and IDIBAPS, researchers analyzed the mutation of a gen detected in a patient who suffered from recurrent anaphylactic shocks caused by the allergy to paper wasp venom (Polistes dominula).

Sonoporation: Underlying mechanisms and applications in cellular regulation
Sonoporation: Underlying Mechanisms and Applications in Cellular Regulation https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0028 Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal.

The wars in Former Yugoslavia continue in the classroom
According to the Education Act, schools in the ethnically divided Bosnia and Herzegovina must teach students ''democratic ideals in a multicultural society.'' But according to new research from the University of Copenhagen, the opposite happens: Segregated schools perpetuate ethnic divisions between Croats, Serbs and Bosniaks, making reconciliation after the 1992-1995 wars extremely difficult.

High greenhouse gas emissions from Siberian Inland Waters
Rivers and lakes at high latitudes are considered to be major sources for greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, but these losses are poorly constrained.

School closures may not reduce coronavirus deaths as much as expected
School closures, the loss of public spaces, and having to work remotely due to the coronavirus pandemic have caused major disruptions in people's lives all over the world.

Case Western Reserve-led team finds that people with dementia at higher risk for COVID-19
A study led by Case Western Reserve University researchers found that patients with dementia were at a significantly increased risk for COVID-19--and the risk was higher still for African Americans with dementia.

Challenges of animal ownership during the pandemic should be considered
Animal owners frequently report concerns and worries relating to caring for their animal during the pandemic, new research suggests.

Chemists developed a simplified method for pharmaceutical compounds synthesizing
A team of chemists from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and Saint Petersburg State University developed a simple and efficient method to synthesize tetrahydroisoquinolines--important organic molecules for drug discovery.

Quantum computing enables simulations to unravel mysteries of magnetic materials
A multi-institutional team became the first to generate accurate results from materials science simulations on a quantum computer that can be verified with neutron scattering experiments and other practical techniques.

Covid-19 vs conservation - how the northern white rhino rescue programme overcame challenges
The COVID-19 pandemic - caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 - has changed the life of people everywhere and affected economic, cultural, social and political processes.

Male sex, BMI, smoking and depression all increase biological age
A 'biological age' score predicts that being male, overweight, a smoker and having depression all contribute to biological aging, a study published today in eLife reports.

New method for asymmetric N,N-acetal synthesis promises advances in drug development
Chiral N,N-acetals are an important component of several bioactive drugs and medicines.

Advanced simulations reveal how air conditioning spreads COVID-19 aerosols
A restaurant outbreak in China was widely reported as strong evidence of airflow-induced transmission of COVID-19, but it lacked a detailed investigation about exactly how transmission occurred.

Disparities in SARS-CoV-2 testing in Massachusetts during COVID-19 pandemic
To mitigate subsequent waves of COVID-19, allocating testing resources to locations of greatest need is important.

THz spectroscopy tracks electron solvation in photoionized water
''This work provides insights on the fundamental aspects of the charge transport process in water and lays a foundation for further understanding of the physicochemical properties and transient evolution of femtosecond-laser-pulse-excited plasma in water.''

Scientists create flexible biocompatible cilia that can be controlled by a magnet
Filaments made of polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are obtained by exposing the material to a magnetic field under controlled temperature.

How cells recycle the machinery that drives their motility?
Research groups at University of Helsinki and Institut Jacques Monod, Paris, discovered a new molecular mechanism that promotes cell migration.

Home office: Majority supports the new regulation
The occupational health and safety regulation regarding the coronavirus has been in effect throughout Germany since the end of January.

Blueprint for understanding the pandemic
Scientific and public health experts have been raising the alarm for decades, imploring public officials to prepare for the inevitability of a viral pandemic.

Key metaphors in the most popular love songs speak of proximity and possession
According to a study by Salvador Climent Roca and Marta Coll-Florit from the GRIAL applied linguistics research group (tied to the UOC Faculty of Arts and Humanities), love is central to 52 of the 71 songs that topped the Billboard magazine's year-end charts from 1946 to 2016.

Environmentally friendly behavior is easy -- tourists just need a 'nudge'
A new study has demonstrated that providing a simple 'nudge' -- or cue -- is an effective way to influence the decision making process of tourists and encourage them to act in more environmentally friendly ways.

Shining a light on the true value of solar power
Utility companies have worried that solar panels drive up electric costs for the people who don't have panels.

The invisible killer lurking in our consumer products
Our consumer products, such as food, cosmetics and clothes, might be filled with nanomaterials - unbeknownst to us.

Ecological interactions as a driver of evolution
In a recent study, an international team of researchers including TUD botanist Prof.

Samara Polytech chemists simplify crystal structures
Samara Polytech scientists have developed new methods of modelling the crystal structure of chemical substances, which makes it possible to obtain additional information about the object under study, unknown in the initial experimental data, and also to find regularities determining its structure and properties.

Starling success traced to rapid adaptation
Love them or hate them, there's no doubt the European Starling is a wildly successful bird.

Why does love of bargain hunting run in families?
Headlines like ''Black Friday Shoppers Trampled in New York'' and popular television shows such as ''Extreme Couponing'' remind us how crazy consumers can get about retail sales promotions.

Collapsed glaciers increase third pole uncertainties: Downstream lakes may merge within a decade
According to researchers from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research (ITP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, meltwater from ice avalanches has been filling downstream lakes in a way that may cause previously separated lakes to merge within the next decade, thus disrupting the function of ecosystems in the region.

Embry-Riddle alumna helps unravel key mysteries of rare stars
Researchers including recent Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University graduate Laura M. Lee have mapped an elderly star's orbit around its oversized and equally ancient partner.

21 per cent of all citations go to the elite
In the last 15 years, elite researchers have increased their share of citations from 14 to 21 per cent, shows new research from Aarhus BSS at Aarhus University.

New study discovers possible early detection method for elusive ovarian cancer
A study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School found a way to detect the presence of ovarian cancer in patients using Pap test samples, normally used to detect cervical cancer.

Desexing cats before 4 months old can reduce the number of unwanted kittens
Big-data research led by an expert on veterinary medicine and infectious diseases at City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has found that although more than 80% of cats in Australia were desexed, only a fraction have had surgery before reaching puberty, thus creating a 'pregnancy gap'.

Known tumour suppressor gene found essential for development, regeneration&stress-response
- Experiments carried out in the Drosophila fly have led to the identification of the headcase (hdc) gene as pivotal for adult progenitor cells, allowing them to undergo metamorphosis and give rise to adult tissue structures.

Design and deployment of COVID-19 technology responses and finding ways to make things
As governments try to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, many are turning to contact tracing, including apps that track your location and electronic check-in QR codes.

Low carbon transport at sea: Ferries voyage optimization in the Adriatic
What CO2 savings are potentially attainable through path optimization? How much can ferries' carbon intensity be decreased?

Drug is promising against pancreatic and breast cancers
The drug is effective at treating pancreatic cancer and prolonging survival in mice, according to a study published in the journal Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Can super-Earth interior dynamics set the table for habitability?
New research led by Carnegie's Yingwei Fei provides a framework for understanding the interiors of super-Earths--rocky exoplanets between 1.5 and 2 times the size of our home planet--which is a prerequisite to assess their potential for habitability.

From trash to treasure: Silicon waste finds new use in Li-ion batteries
Researchers at Osaka University used Si swarf and ultrathin graphite sheets to fabricate Li-ion battery electrodes with high areal capacity and current density at a reduced cost.

Breast cancer death rates stop declining in younger women
Breast cancer death rates have stopped declining for women in the U.S. younger than age 40, ending a trend that existed from 1987 to 2010, according to a new study.

Early study points to potential therapeutic avenue for a pair of rare pediatric diseases
Scientists have devised a new approach for detecting and potentially heading off the effects of two rare pediatric diseases before birth.

'Defective' carbon simplifies hydrogen peroxide production
Rice University scientists introduce a new catalyst to reduce oxygen to widely used hydrogen peroxide.

New CRISPR tech targets human genome's complex code
Rice bioengineers harness the CRISPR/Cas9 system to program histones, the support proteins that wrap up and control human DNA, to manipulate gene activation and phosphorylation.

Racism and anti-gay discrimination heighten risk for arrest and incarceration
New research by Morgan Philbin, PhD, at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues looks at why Black young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are disproportionately subject to high rates of arrest and incarceration.

Ancient Amazonian farmers fortified valuable land they had spent years making fertile to protect it
Ancient Amazonian communities fortified valuable land they had spent years making fertile to protect it from conflict, excavations show.

Phages can anticipate bacteria's location and destroy them before they cause an infection
A novel strategy has the potential of becoming a game changer in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria that live in hard-to-reach places.

Lipid composition of microalgae of the Kaliningrad Region was determined
Scientists from the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and Kemerovo State University determined the qualitative and quantitative composition of fatty acids that the lipids of microalgae comprise.

Astronomers offer possible explanation for elusive dark-matter-free galaxies
A team led by astronomers at the University of California, Riverside, has found that some dwarf galaxies may today appear to be dark-matter free even though they formed as galaxies dominated by dark matter in the past.

Nanocarriers in the enhancement of therapeutic efficacy of natural drugs
https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0040 Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal.

Baby vampire bat adopted by mom's best friend
The strong relationship formed between two female adult vampire bats may have motivated one of the bats to adopt the other's baby.

Biomaterials could mean better vaccines, virus-fighting surfaces
Advances in the fields of biomaterials and nanotechnology could lead to big breakthroughs in the fight against dangerous viruses like the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

A new type of university is emerging to meet the challenges of today
A new type of university is emerging, one that steps beyond the American research university model and is nimble and responsive, takes responsibility for what happens outside its walls and can scale up to meet the demands and challenges of modern society.

Elderly esophageal cancer patients often receive suboptimal therapy due to perceived risks
Elderly patients (70 years and over) with locally advanced esophageal (E) and esophagogastric junction (EGJ) cancer (located in the stomach and esophagus) should be considered for optimal therapy that has the potential to cure.

Chemists identified necessary conditions for successful synthesis of small molecules
A team of researchers from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and Saint Petersburg State University identified the factors that affect the speed of synthesis of organic molecules consisting of several heterocycles.

Collective worm and robot 'blobs' protect individuals, swarm together
Individually, California blackworms live an unremarkable life eating microorganisms in ponds and serving as tropical fish food for aquarium enthusiasts.

Scientists urge for investment now in highly potent vaccines to prevent the next pandemic
In an article that appears in the journal Nature, Dennis Burton, PhD, and Eric Topol, MD, of Scripps Research call for governments to provide significant funding support for rational vaccine design based on broadly neutralizing antibodies.

Physicists finesse the storing of light to create rainbows of colour
Physicists at the University of Bath have found a way to use resonance to harness the energy of light more effectively inside microresonators.

Quantum causal loops
Causal reasoning is ubiquitous - from physics to medicine, economics and social sciences, as well as in everyday life.

Children's finger length points to mothers' income level
Low-income mothers feminize their children in the womb by adjusting their hormones, whereas high-income mothers masculinize their children, a major study based on finger length, led by a Swansea University expert, has found.

A new modifier increases the efficiency of perovskite solar cells
The research team of NUST MISIS has presented an improved structure of perovskite solar cells.

Combination therapy with radiation shows promise in treating glioblastoma
In a study of mice, researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a new approach that combines an anti-psychotic drug, a statin used to lower high cholesterol levels, and radiation to improve the overall survival in mice with glioblastoma

Researching ways to improve sustainability and reduce waste in the seafood industry
Nutritionists have been touting the health benefits of seafood for years.

Can current smartphone technology tell you when a pandemic might come calling?
UC San Diego researchers find that an optical tool already embedded in many smartphones can accurately diagnose blood-oxygen levels and help monitor respiratory disease in patients, particularly when they are quarantined at home.

Not a living fossil: How the Coelacanth recently evolved dozens of new genes
The research shows the dramatic effect traveling DNA can have on the creation of genes and provide a glimpse into some of the forces that shaped the genome of one of the most ancient and mysterious organisms.

How diseases and history are intertwined
In an introductory seminar course, students explored how vector-borne diseases have influenced history and found that they often most heavily impacted marginalized communities.

How accurate are first impressions on a first date?
The high stakes of first dates require would-be partners to make and interpret first impressions.

Antiviral proves effective at preventing, treating COVID-19 in lab
Publishing their work in Nature, scientists at the UNC School of Medicine and UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health tested how the orally administered experimental drug EIDD-2801 halts SARS-CoV-2 replication and prevents infection of human cells in a new in vivo model containing human lung tissue.

Training to wisely navigate social conflicts
People are able to approach social conflicts more wisely if they have trained themselves in advance by practicing a distanced self-talk technique, referring to themselves with third-person pronouns such as ''she'' or ''they'' rather than the first-person pronouns of ''me'' or ''I.''

Researchers study how lifelong environmentalists want their remains handled after death
A new study from the University of Kansas in the journal Mortality details how older environmentalists consider death care and how likely they are to choose ''green'' burials and other eco-friendly options.

COVID-19 pandemic as opportunity to ensure more successful future for science, public health
The missteps and miscommunications that have stymied a more effective U.S. and global response to the COVID-19 pandemic bring into sharp focus the deficiencies in governance systems of the U.S. public health and scientific institutions.

AD diagnostics could become more accessible
A team of researchers from the Laboratory of Biophysics at NUST MISIS, Lomonosov Moscow State University and D.

Unusual DNA folding increases the rates of mutations
DNA sequences that can fold into shapes other than the classic double helix tend to have higher mutation rates than other regions in the human genome.

The pandemic lockdown leads to cleaner city air across Canada, Concordia paper reveals
Researchers at Concordia University found that emission levels dropped dramatically over the course of the pandemic.

Scientists suggested using non-symmetrical magnets for target drug delivery
A team of scientists from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and the University of Genoa suggested combining permanent magnets of different shapes to target magnetic particles with drugs at the organs of lab mice.

Porous materials unfavorable for coronavirus survival
As COVID-19 spreads via respiratory droplets, researchers have become increasingly interested in the drying of droplets on impermeable and porous surfaces; surfaces that accelerate evaporation can decelerate the spread of the virus.

Expanded spina bifida guidelines cover care from newborn to adult
Globally, nearly 300,000 babies are born with neural tube defects including spina bifida (SB) each year.

Mean or nice? These traits could make or break a child's friendships
While it's logical to assume that children who are mean have friendships characterized by growing strife and that children who are nice report little of the same, these assumptions haven't been tested in real-world friendships.

Human eye beats machine in archaeological color identification test
A ruler and scale can tell archaeologists the size and weight of a fragment of pottery - but identifying its precise color can depend on individual perception.

Universal access to preventive drugs could reduce HIV incidence in sub-Saharan Africa
Universal HIV testing with linkage to treatment and prevention may be a promising approach to accelerate reductions in new infections in generalized epidemic settings, according to a study published February 9th, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Catherine Koss of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues.

Super-Earth atmospheres probed at Sandia's Z machine
Sandia National Laboratorie' Z machine has replicated the gravitational pressures on so-called ''super-Earths'' to determine which might maintain atmospheres that could support life.

The Lancet Planetary Health: Millions of lives saved annually by 2040 if countries raise their climate ambitions to meet Paris Agreement targets, modelling study suggests
New research from The Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change published in a special issue of The Lancet Planetary Health journal highlights the benefits to health if countries adopt climate plans - Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) - that are consistent with the Paris Agreement aim of limiting warming to 'well below 2°C'.

Small and medium-sized firms use social media to reach and persuade new customers
During the COVID-19 pandemic, small and medium-sized firms (SME) have become increasingly dependent on social media as a tool for their international sales process, according to a recent study published in International Business Review.

Relaxed precautions, not climate, the biggest factor driving wintertime COVID-19 outbreaks
Wintertime outbreaks of COVID-19 have been largely driven by whether people adhere to control measures such as mask wearing and social distancing, according to a study by researchers affiliated with the Climate Change and Infectious Disease initiative based in Princeton University's High Meadows Environmental Institute.

RUDN University ecologist suggested a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in animal farming
An ecologist from RUDN University suggested a method to evaluate and reduce the effect of animal farms on climate change and developed a set of measures for small farms that provides for the complete elimination of greenhouse gas emissions.

Dragonflies perform upside down backflips to right themselves
High speed cameras and CGI technology have revealed the inbuilt righting mechanisms used by dragonflies when they are thrown off balance.

A study presents an algorithm that automates electrocardiogram recordings
Artificial intelligence can help health personnel to diagnose heart diseases, as shown in a study published in Scientific Reports, by Guillermo Jiménez-Pérez and Oscar Camara, members of the PhySense group, and Alejandro Alcaine, a researcher at the University of San Jorge, Zaragoza.

Social distancing in the natural world: Strategies to detect and avoid disease
The notion of social distancing rose to public prominence approximately a year ago, when health officials began recommending it as a way to slow the spread of the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus.

SARS-CoV-2 infection among migrant workers in Singapore
Researchers examined how common SARS- CoV-2 infection was among migrant workers in Singapore.

Changing cropping systems in impaired watersheds can produce water quality gains
Growing the right crop in the right place within an impaired watershed can achieve significant water quality improvements, according to Penn State researchers, who conducted a novel study in the drainage of a Susquehanna River tributary in an agricultural area in southeastern Pennsylvania.

Making good decisions about COVID-19
In their article, Rode and Fischbeck note that many of the key decisions facing individuals, corporations and governments all depend on two basic values: the probability a person has the virus and the probability that person transmits the virus.

Regular walnut consumption may reduce negative outcomes of H. pylori infection
A new animal study, published in the Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition, suggests regular walnut consumption may be a promising intervention for reducing negative outcomes associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, a widespread bacterial infection that affects more than half of the world's population.

Bats on the rise
Bats carried aloft to almost 2,000 metres by air currents

Six previously FDA-approved drugs appear promising against SARS-CoV-2 in laboratory testing
A team of investigators from the Republic of China has discovered that six drugs previously approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for other indications could be repurposed to treat or prevent COVID-19.

Arizona economic burden of valley fever totals $736 million
Expenses for the fungal disease endemic to the Southwest can skyrocket for people whose diagnosis is delayed, leading to more serious infection or death.

Texas Heart Institute develops breakthrough heart ablation evaluation system
The Texas Heart Institute (THI) has announced that a research team led by Dr.

Breastfeeding mothers produce COVID-19 antibodies capable of neutralizing virus
Breastfeeding women with COVID-19 do not pass along the SARS-CoV-2 virus in their milk but do transfer milk-borne antibodies that are able to neutralize the virus, a multi-institutional team of researchers led by the University of Idaho reported.

International research team begins uncovering Arctic mystery
According to 25 international researchers who collaborated on a first-of-its-kind study, frozen land beneath rising sea levels currently traps 60 billion tons of methane and 560 billion tons of organic carbon.
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