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Science News Archive | Brightsurf | (November 2019)

Science news and current events archive from November, 2019.

Show All Years  •  2019  •  Show All Months (2019)  •  November

Week 44
Friday November 1, 2019 (43)
Saturday November 2, 2019 (2)
Sunday November 3, 2019 (7)

Week 45
Monday November 4, 2019 (123)
Tuesday November 5, 2019 (113)
Wednesday November 6, 2019 (120)
Thursday November 7, 2019 (114)
Friday November 8, 2019 (75)
Saturday November 9, 2019 (26)
Sunday November 10, 2019 (7)

Week 46
Monday November 11, 2019 (138)
Tuesday November 12, 2019 (135)
Wednesday November 13, 2019 (139)
Thursday November 14, 2019 (134)
Friday November 15, 2019 (48)
Saturday November 16, 2019 (6)
Sunday November 17, 2019 (8)

Week 47
Monday November 18, 2019 (129)
Tuesday November 19, 2019 (8)


Top Science Current Events and Science News from November 2019



Zooming into cilia sheds light into blinding diseases
A new study reveals an unprecedented close-up view of cilia linked to blindness. (2019-11-05)
Global climate change concerns for Africa's Lake Victoria
UH Researcher and team developed a model to project lake levels in world's largest tropical lake (2019-11-14)
Talk to the hand
Fans of the blockbuster movie 'Iron Man 3' might remember the characters step inside the digital projection of a 'big brain' and watch as groups of neurons are 'lit up' along the brain's neural 'map' in response to physical touch. (2019-11-05)
Discovery reveals mechanism that turns herpes virus on and off
New research from Dr. Luis M. Schang and his group at the Baker Institute for Animal Health has identified a new mechanism that plays a role in controlling how the herpes virus alternates between dormant and active stages of infection. (2019-11-14)
Secretome of pleural effusions associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant meso
Cryopreserved cell-free PE fluid from 101 NSCLC patients, 8 mesothelioma and 13 with benign PE was assayed for a panel of 40 cytokines/chemokines using the Luminex system. (2019-11-05)
Quantum computers learn to mark their own work
A new test to check if a quantum computer is giving correct answers to questions beyond the scope of traditional computing could help the first quantum computer that can outperform a classical computer to be realised. (2019-11-18)
U of M research discovers subcellular computations within the brain during decision-making
New University of Minnesota Medical School research suggests that during decision-making, neurons in the brain are capable of much more complex processing than previously thought. (2019-11-14)
Increased exercise over the age of 60 reduces risk of heart disease and stroke
People over the age of 60 should do more exercise not less in order to prevent heart disease and stroke, according to findings from a study of over 1.1 million elderly people published in the European Heart Journal. (2019-11-07)
Stuck in a Polish nuclear weapon bunker cannibal wood ants found the way home
Coming back to their 2016 study of a wood ant colony of workers trapped in a post-Soviet nuclear weapon bunker in Poland, a research team, led by Prof. (2019-11-04)
Go with the flow: Scientists design new grid batteries for renewable energy
Scientists at Berkeley Lab have designed an affordable 'flow battery' membrane that could accelerate renewable energy for the electrical grid. (2019-11-07)
Bigger doesn't mean better for hatchery-released salmon
A recent study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecosphere examines hatchery practices in regards to how Chinook salmon hatcheries in the PNW are affecting wild populations over the past decades. (2019-11-14)
How the Aztecs could improve modern urban farming
Highly intensive production systems with low resource demand are a strategic goal of urban agriculture developers. (2019-11-01)
DNA technology as a novel strategy for delivery of anti-HIV antibodies
Wistar scientists applied synthetic DNA-based technology to drive in vivo production of broadly neutralizing anti-HIV antibodies in small and large-animal models, providing proof of concept for a simple and effective next generation approach to HIV prevention and therapy. (2019-11-08)
Observing changes in the chirality of molecules in real time
Chiral molecules - compounds that are mirror images of each other - play an important role in biological processes and in chemical synthesis. (2019-11-14)
Parity law improved medicaid acceptance at substance use disorder treatment centers
A 2008 federal parity law succeeded in expanding Medicaid acceptance by treatment facilities for substance use disorders (SUDs), according to a study by University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers. (2019-11-14)
Research to make (fun) multi-player gaming an educational experience
A new video game framework brings together two well-studied approaches to educational software in order to keep multiple players engrossed in the learning experience while fostering collaboration and problem solving. (2019-11-13)
Artificial intelligence technology may improve care for patients needing dialysis
A machine learning model boosted rates of patients who started dialysis under optimal conditions. (2019-11-07)
New health insurance benefit at U-M led to increased rates of IVF
In a new research letter appearing in JAMA detailing a first-of-its-kind study, a University of Michigan team compared the use of IVF among university employees before and after the addition of an insurance coverage benefit, finding a marked increase in the rate of use. (2019-11-13)
Ancient Rome: a 12,000-year history of genetic flux, migrations and diversity
Scholars have been all over Rome for hundreds of years, but it still holds some secrets - for instance, relatively little is known about where the city's denizens actually came from. (2019-11-08)
Newly developed nanoparticles help fight lung cancer in animal model
Scientists have reported a new approach to treating lung cancer with inhaled nanoparticles developed at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health. (2019-11-14)
Quality over quantity! Interval walking training improves fitness and health in elderly individuals
Interval Walking Training is a method that is effective in increasing overall fitness and decreasing healthcare costs associated with lifestyle-related diseases of the middle-aged and elderly. (2019-11-01)
Flatland light
Harvard researchers have developed rewritable optical components for surface light waves. (2019-11-06)
Direct-to-patient telemedicine cardiology follow-ups may safely save families time, cost
Health provider follow-ups delivered via computer or smartphone is a feasible alternative to in-person patient follow-ups for some pediatric cardiac conditions, according to the findings of a pilot study presented at the AHA Scientific Sessions this week. (2019-11-14)
New transmission model for Ebola predicted Uganda cases
A new risk assessment model for the transmission of Ebola accurately predicted its spread into the Republic of Uganda, according to the Kansas State University researchers who developed it. (2019-11-05)
Predicting the response of HIV-infected individuals to checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy
Scientists led by Andreas Meyerhans and Gennady Bocharov have designed a mathematical model to predict the response of HIV-infected individuals to a type of cancer immunotherapy. (2019-11-07)
Disordered proteins become stable, 'super-sticky' materials
Biomedical engineers from Duke University have demonstrated that they can create stable materials from engineered disordered proteins by altering the environmental triggers that cause them to undergo phase transitions. (2019-11-01)
KIER Identified Ion Transfer Principles of Salinity Gradient Power Generation Technology
Dr. Kim Hanki of Jeju Global Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research(KIER) developed a mathematical analysis model that can identify the ion transfer principle of salinity gradient power technology. (2019-11-07)
Going with the floe: Sea ice movements trace dynamics transforming the new Arctic
UC Riverside-led research is the first to use MODIS satellite imagery to understand long-term ocean movements from sea ice dynamics. (2019-11-14)
Smart people may learn music faster
Why do some people learn music more quickly than others? (2019-11-14)
TGen-USC researchers link sisters' paralysis to an 'extremely rare' genetic variant
Following a nearly 25-year search across three continents, parents of a pair of sisters -- who as children slowly became paralyzed from the waist down -- finally have a diagnosis, according to researchers at USC and TGen. (2019-11-14)
Pesticide management is failing Australian and Great Barrier Reef waterways
Scientists say a failure of Australian management means excessive amounts of harmful chemicals -- many now banned in countries such as the EU, USA and Canada -- are damaging the country's waterways and the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-11-07)
Discriminating diets of meat-eating dinosaurs
A big problem with dinosaurs is that there seem to be too many meat-eaters. (2019-11-03)
The invisible US Hispanic/Latino HIV crisis: Addressing gaps in the national response
Vincent Guilamo-Ramos of New York University's Silver School of Social Work unpacks the alarming rate of HIV infections among Hispanics/Latinos, in American Journal of Public Health. (2019-11-14)
Architecture of a bacterial power plant decrypted
Scientists from the Universities of Würzburg and Freiburg determined the structure of the bacterial enzyme cytochrome bd oxidase. (2019-11-14)
Get your game face on: Study finds it may help
Could putting on a serious face in preparation for competition actually impact performance? (2019-11-14)
University of Cincinnati finds new option for liver transplant patients
Budesonide, a drug commonly used to treat Crohn's Disease, may offer fewer side effects and work at least as well as prednisone as an anti-organ rejection medication in liver transplant patients. (2019-11-08)
Studies find nurse-led program improves care of older adults
An analysis of research on the Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) program finds that it improves older adult care, including preventing falls, improving patient safety and quality of care, reducing potentially inappropriate medications, and helping healthcare providers to care for patients with dementia. (2019-11-04)
Nature might be better than tech at reducing air pollution
Adding plants and trees to the landscapes near factories and other pollution sources could reduce air pollution by an average of 27 percent, new research suggests. (2019-11-06)
NASA finds Tropical Storm Maha's heavy rain potential over Lakshadweep
Tropical Cyclone Maha continued to move north along the southwestern coast of India when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and analyzed the cloud top temperatures. (2019-11-01)
Supplements don't preserve kidney health in Type 2 diabetes
Supplements of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids (often sold as fish oil) do not help people with type 2 diabetes stave off chronic kidney disease, according to findings from the largest clinical study to date of the supplements in this patient population. (2019-11-08)
Firefighters can ease one another's job stress, but loving spouses may increase it
Strong same-sex friendships among male firefighters can help cut down on their stress -- but loving relationships with their wives may increase anxiety for those who constantly face danger, according to a Baylor University study. (2019-11-13)
Improved fitness can mean living longer without dementia
Staying fit or improving fitness over time should be a goal for anyone who wants to reduce the likelihood of getting dementia. (2019-11-14)
Groundbreaking HIV vaccine design strategy shows promise in proof-of-principle tests
The new vaccine strategy centers on stimulating the immune system to produce broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against HIV. (2019-11-07)
Behavioral therapy for insomnia shows benefit for children with autism and their parents
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders have found cognitive behavioral therapy can improve child and parent sleep, child behavior and parent fatigue. (2019-11-05)
Horses blink less, twitch eyelids more when stressed
A horse will blink less and twitch its eyelids more when it's under mild stress, the research team found -- a new finding that could offer handlers a simple, easy-to-spot sign their animal is becoming agitated. (2019-11-06)
Alpine rock axeheads became social and economic exchange fetishes in the Neolithic
The mechanical capacity to resist successive transformation processes gave these rocks an exceptional exchange value that favoured the formation of long-distance exchange networks in Western Europe, according to a study led by the UAB that integrates petrography, materials science and paleoeconomics. (2019-11-14)
Moffitt researchers identify a mechanism controlling tumor cell recognition by immune cells
Immunotherapy has become a standard treatment approach for several types of cancer, including melanoma. (2019-11-01)
Autistic adults thought they were 'bad people'
Many over-50s who were diagnosed with autism late in life had grown up believing they were bad people, according to a new study published in the journal Health Psychology and Behavioural Medicine. (2019-11-06)
Could home remote monitoring improve the health of patients on peritoneal dialysis?
A home remote monitoring system may help track the health of patients on dialysis. (2019-11-07)
NASA-NOAA satellite finds a weaker, transitioning Tropical Storm Halong
Halong continued to weaken and is transitioning into an extra-tropical cyclone. (2019-11-08)

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#541 Wayfinding
These days when we want to know where we are or how to get where we want to go, most of us will pull out a smart phone with a built-in GPS and map app. Some of us old timers might still use an old school paper map from time to time. But we didn't always used to lean so heavily on maps and technology, and in some remote places of the world some people still navigate and wayfind their way without the aid of these tools... and in some cases do better without them. This week, host Rachelle Saunders...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.