Brightsurf Science News & Current Events Archive (October 2014)

Science news and science current events archive October, 2014.

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Top Science News & Current Event Articles from October 2014

Acknowledging appearance reduces bias when beauties apply for masculine jobs, says CU-led study
Past research shows physical beauty can be detrimental to women applying for masculine jobs. But belles can put the brakes on discrimination by acknowledging their looks during an interview, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

Big black holes can block new stars
Massive black holes spewing out radio-frequency-emitting particles at near-light speed can block formation of new stars in aging galaxies, a study has found.

Is fleet diversity key to sustainable fisheries?
Concern about fisheries is widespread around the world. Over the past several decades, a robust discussion has taken place concerning how to manage fisheries better to benefit ecosystems and humans. Much of the discussion has focused on preserving biological diversity, a critical component of healthy ecosystems. One aspect that gets less attention is the role of fishing fleet diversity.

EMA open to discuss use of complementary methodologies for rare cancers
Rare Cancers Europe (RCE) is a multi stakeholder initiative promoted by ESMO dedicated to putting rare cancers on the European political agenda. In their consensus document, RCE argue that a higher degree of uncertainty should be accepted for regulatory as well as clinically informed decision-making in rare cancers, to overcome the limitations imposed by small population trials.

Miniature camera may lead to fewer accidents
Measuring only a few cubic millimeters, a new type of camera module might soon be integrated into future driver assistance systems to help car drivers facing critical situations. The little gadget can be built into the vehicle without taking up space. The way it works is particularly reliable, thanks to its special encapsulation.

EPA grant will help localities conserve headwater wetlands
Researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science have received a three-year, $392,773 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to identify the streams and wetlands most vulnerable to sea-level rise, and to develop tools to help local governments and citizens conserve these important ecosystems.

Energy drinks cause insomnia and nervousness in athletes
A study analyzing the positive and negative effects of energy drinks on athletes has seen that, although in principle their sports performance was seen to improve by between 3 percent and 7 percent, there was also an increase in the frequency of insomnia, nervousness and the level of stimulation in the hours following competition.

Lead-free glass decor
Whether on baby bottles, beer mugs or perfume bottles, imprints on glass consist mainly of lead oxide. Fraunhofer researchers have developed printing inks for glass that do not contain any toxic elements. At the glasstec tradefair from Oct. 21st to 24th in Düsseldorf, they are going to present the new imprints (Hall 15, Booth A33).

From concussions to ethics: Pediatricians tackle hot-button issues in youth sports
Pediatricians will tackle some of the hottest topics in youth sports during a symposium to be held prior to the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition in San Diego. Titled '1, 2, 3, Go! Sports in the World of Pediatrics -- Playing it Safe and Making it Fun!' the Peds21 symposium will be held from 12:35 to 5 p.m. PDT Oct. 10 in Ballroom 6 CDEF of the San Diego Convention Center.

Electromobility, efficient and safe
An attractive electric vehicle at an affordable price that provides safety and comfort combined with a reasonable driving range: that was the goal of the Visio.M project. The participating researchers at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen who put together the car in collaboration with specialists from industry are now unveiling it to the public.

Teens' science interest linked with knowledge, but only in wealthier nations
It seems logical that a student who is interested in science as an academic subject would also know a lot about science, but new findings show that this link depends on the overall wealth of the country that the teen calls home. The research suggests that individual science achievement may be influenced as much by broad national-level resources as it is by personal interest and motivation.

Toddlers regulate behavior to avoid making adults angry
Researchers at the University of Washington have found that children as young as 15 months can detect anger when watching other people's social interactions and then use that emotional information to guide their own behavior.

Generic medications boost adherence to breast cancer therapy
A study has found that the introduction of generic breast cancer drugs, which are less expensive than their brand-name counterparts, increased treatment adherence by 50 percent.

NUS researchers discover for the first time that a rare bush frog breeds in bamboo
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have discovered a new reproductive mode in frogs and toads -- breeding and laying direct developing eggs in live bamboo with narrow openings -- which was observed in the white spotted bush frog (Raorchestes chalazodes). This critically endangered frog is currently only one of two species known to adopt this novel reproductive strategy. The findings were published in The Linnean Society of London's Biological Journal of the Linnean Society.

Climate-KIC CEO calls on climate change leaders to focus their efforts on creating sustainable cities
At the R20 World Summit of Regions for Climate in Paris on Oct. 10-11, CEO Bertrand van Ee of the EU's main climate innovation initiative Climate-KIC will call for more cross-sector initiatives to enable integrated climate change innovation focused on meeting the environmental challenges faced by our urban areas.

Taxonomy -- the Leopoldina publishes recommendations on researching biodiversity
With a view to making optimal use of the new opportunities available to taxonomy, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina recommends, in its statement entitled 'Challenges and Opportunities of Integrative Taxonomy for Research and Society,' promoting efforts to describe all the species of Central Europe. The statement also calls for investments in taxonomic research and teaching.

Mathematical model shows how the brain remains stable during learning
Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to an international team of scientists from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan, UC San Francisco, and Columbia University in New York.

Modeling cancer: Virginia Tech researchers prove models can predict cellular processes
Researchers developed mathematical models to predict the dynamics of cell transitions, and compared their results with actual measurements of activity in cell populations. The results could inform efforts to treat cancer patients.

Stem cell discovery challenges dogma on how fetus develops; holds insights for liver cancer and reg
A Mount Sinai-led research team has discovered a new kind of stem cell that can become either a liver cell or a cell that lines liver blood vessels, according to a study published today in the journal Stem Cell Reports.

NASA's HS3 mission continues with flights over Hurricane Gonzalo
Tropical Storm Gonzalo strengthened into a hurricane on Oct. 14 when it was near Puerto Rico and provided a natural laboratory for the next phase of NASA's HS3 or Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel mission.

Eighty percent of bowel cancers halted with existing medicines
An international team of scientists has shown that more than 80 percent of bowel cancers could be treated with existing drugs. The study found that medicines called 'JAK inhibitors' halted tumor growth in bowel cancers with a genetic mutation that is present in more than 80 per cent of bowel cancers. Multiple JAK inhibitors are currently used, or are in clinical trials, for diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, blood cancers and myeloproliferative disorders.

Change your walking style, change your mood
Our mood can affect how we walk -- slump-shouldered if we're sad, bouncing along if we're happy. Now researchers have shown it works the other way too -- making people imitate a happy or sad way of walking actually affects their mood.

New theorem determines the age distribution of populations from fruit flies to humans
The initial motivation was to estimate the age structure of a fruit fly population, the result a fundamental theorem that can help determine the age distribution of essentially any group. This emerging theorem on stationary populations shows that you can determine the age distribution of a population by looking at how long they still have to live.

Design of micro and nanoparticles to improve treatments for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's
At the Faculty of Pharmacy of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country encapsulation techniques are being developed to deliver correctly and effectively certain drugs.

Most published medical research is false; Here's how to improve
In 2005, in a landmark paper viewed well over a million times, John Ioannidis explained in PLOS Medicine why most published research findings are false. To coincide with PLOS Medicine's 10th anniversary he responds to the challenge of this situation by suggesting how the research enterprise could be improved.

Solving the mystery of the 'man in the moon'
MIT researchers find that a volcanic plume, not an asteroid, likely created the moon's largest basin.

Thyroid carcinoma: Biomarker reveals cancer cause
The expression of the protein CLIP2 provides information on whether a papillary thyroid carcinoma was induced by radiation or had a sporadic origin. With this discovery, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München have identified a new biomarker for the diagnosis of the cancer cause. Their findings have been published in the journal 'Oncogene.'

Persuading doctors to quickly adopt new treatments
Doctors are more likely to try a new therapy when they are persuaded to do so by an influential colleague, reports a new study whose findings on adopting innovations have relevance for business and education. The authors used the finding to simulate a technology intervention that acts like an influential colleague -- opinionated but not bossy -- that they will design for the real world. The goal is to speed physicians' adoption of new treatments, which can take up to 17 years.

'Mini-stroke' may lead to post-traumatic stress disorder
About 30 percent of transient ischemic attack or 'mini-stroke' patients had symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a new study. Those with PTSD had more depression, anxiety and reduced mental and physical quality of life. Patients overestimating their stroke risk and who don't cope with their mini-stroke well are at higher risk to develop PTSD.

Blood test developed to diagnose early onset Alzheimer's disease
A non-invasive blood test that could diagnose early onset Alzheimer's disease with increased accuracy has been developed by University of Melbourne researchers.

EEG test to help understand and treat schizophrenia
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have validated an EEG test to study and treat schizophrenia. The findings, published in two separate studies, offer a clinical test that could be used to help diagnose persons at risk for developing mental illness later in life, as well as an approach for measuring the efficacies of different treatment options.

Researchers uncover how 'love hormone' regulates sexual behavior
Oxytocin has been called the 'love hormone' because it plays an important role in social behaviors, such as maternal care and pair bonding. In a new study researchers uncover oxytocin-responsive brain cells that are necessary for female social interest in male mice during estrus -- the sexually receptive phase of their cycle. These neurons, found in the prefrontal cortex, may play a role in other oxytocin-related social behaviors such as intimacy, love, or mother-child bonding.

Largest study of Hispanics/Latinos finds depression and anxiety rates vary widely among groups
Rates of depression and anxiety vary widely among different segments of the US Hispanic and Latino population, with the highest prevalence of depressive symptoms in Puerto Ricans, according to a new report from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. The researchers' findings also suggest that depression and anxiety may be undertreated among Hispanics and Latinos, particularly if they are uninsured. The study was published online in Annals of Epidemiology.

'Shrinking goats' another indicator that climate change affects animal size
Alpine goats appear to be shrinking in size as they react to changes in climate, according to new research from Durham University.

Computerized surveillance system quickly detects disease outbreaks among preschoolers
A web-based system that allows preschools and child care centers to report illnesses to local public health departments could improve the detection of disease outbreaks and allow resources to be mobilized more quickly.

UNH hosts oil spill response forum Oct. 28-29
It's been 25 years since the Exxon Valdez spilled 11 million gallons of crude oil into Prince William Sound, and nearly five years since the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico gushed 200 million gallons of crude oil. On Oct. 28-29, 2014, nearly 40 experts and eyewitnesses from science, government, industry and NGOs will gather to look back -- and forward -- at oil spill response.

Beyond LOL cats, social networks could become trove of biodiversity data
Vijay Barve demonstrated social networks to be a viable source for photo-vouchered biodiversity records, especially those that clarify which species exist in what places within developing nations.

Hungry or not, kids will eat treats
Even though they are not hungry, children as young as three will find high-energy treats too tempting to refuse, new QUT research has found.

Robotically assisted bypass surgery reduces complications after surgery and cuts recovery
Robotically assisted coronary artery bypass grafting surgery is a rapidly evolving technology that shortens hospital stays and reduces the need for blood products, while decreasing recovery times, making the procedure safer and less risky.

Reminiscing can help boost mental performance
New research led by Cornell University neuroscientist Nathan Spreng shows for the first time that engaging brain areas linked to so-called 'off-task' mental activities (such as mind-wandering and reminiscing) can actually boost performance on some challenging mental tasks.

Can bariatric surgery lead to severe headache?
Bariatric surgery may be a risk factor for a condition that causes severe headaches, according to a study published in the Oct. 22, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation selected to receive Innovation Grant from EMD Serono
An Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientist has been selected to receive one of only five Grants for Multiple Sclerosis Innovation awarded this year by the pharmaceutical company EMD Serono. The award will provide OMRF's Robert Axtell, Ph.D., with $280,000 over two years to study the role a pair of molecules play in the progression of MS and a related condition. Axtell's project was selected from more than 200 applicants worldwide.

Decrease of genetic diversity in the endangered Saimaa ringed seal continues
The critically endangered Saimaa ringed seal, which inhabits Lake Saimaa in Finland, has extremely low genetic diversity and this development seems to continue, according to a recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland.

E-healthcare may help reverse the trend of high CVD and obesity in China
The use of electronic health care services versus more traditional methods to reduce the high incidence of heart disease in China will be debated by leading cardiologists from around the world in Beijing, from Oct. 16-19, 2014.

I have to walk how many miles to burn off this soda?
Adolescents who saw printed signs explaining the number of miles they would need to walk to burn off the calories in a sugary drink were more likely to leave the store with a lower calorie beverage, a healthier beverage or a smaller size beverage, according to new Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health research.

Quarraisha Abdool Karim wins TWAS-Lenovo Prize
South African scientist named winner of The World Academy of Sciences' most prestigious award for commitment to life-saving research that protects African women from HIV/AIDS

Treatments for HIV-visceral leishmaniasis co-infected patients
The international research and development consortium, AfriCoLeish, formed by six research organizations from East Africa and Europe, has launched a Phase III clinical study to address the extreme difficulty in treating visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in patients who also are HIV-positive. The study will assess the efficacy and the safety of two treatments: a combination treatment of AmBisome and miltefosine, and AmBisome alone. This is the first randomized clinical trial in Africa to confirm the World Health Organization's recommendation for HIV-VL treatment.

Winners of the 2014 Semantic Web Challenge announced at the International Semantic Web Conference
The winners of the 2014 Semantic Web Challenge have been announced. Selected by a jury of leading experts in the computer science discipline from both academia and industry, winners were announced at the International Semantic Web Conference held in Riva del Garda, Italy, this month. Both the challenge and awards were sponsored by Elsevier.

MARC travel awards announced for: AMP 2014 Meeting
The FASEB MARC Program has announced the travel award recipients for the AMP 2014 Annual Meeting in National Harbor, Md. These awards are meant to promote the entry of students, post doctorates and scientists from underrepresented groups into the mainstream of the basic science community and to encourage the participation of young scientists at the AMP 2014 Annual Meeting. This year MARC conferred 3 awards totaling $5,550.

Study reveals how deadly MERS virus enters human cells
Cornell University researchers have uncovered details of how the deadly Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) enters host cells, and offer possible new avenues for treatment. The study, appearing online this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, discovered that a common protease enzyme known as furin activates the MERS-CoV to fuse with cell membranes and enter host cells.

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