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Science News Archive | Brightsurf | (October 2020)

Science news and current events archive from October, 2020.

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Week 40
Thursday October 1, 2020 (118)
Friday October 2, 2020 (56)
Saturday October 3, 2020 (24)
Sunday October 4, 2020 (9)

Week 41
Monday October 5, 2020 (132)
Tuesday October 6, 2020 (115)
Wednesday October 7, 2020 (126)
Thursday October 8, 2020 (124)
Friday October 9, 2020 (60)
Saturday October 10, 2020 (3)
Sunday October 11, 2020 (11)

Week 42
Monday October 12, 2020 (118)
Tuesday October 13, 2020 (114)
Wednesday October 14, 2020 (140)
Thursday October 15, 2020 (125)
Friday October 16, 2020 (90)
Saturday October 17, 2020 (8)
Sunday October 18, 2020 (6)

Week 43
Monday October 19, 2020 (125)
Tuesday October 20, 2020 (36)


Top Science Current Events and Science News from October 2020



Cheating birds mimic host nestlings to deceive foster parents
While common cuckoos mimic their host's eggs, new research has revealed that a group of parasitic finch species in Africa have evolved to mimic their host's chicks - and with astonishing accuracy. (2020-10-02)
Scientists find evidence of exotic state of matter in candidate material for quantum computers
Using a novel technique, scientists working at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory have found evidence for a quantum spin liquid, a state of matter that is promising as a building block for the quantum computers of tomorrow. (2020-10-05)
Emerging field of integrative palliative care highlighted in journal special issue
An emerging field characterized as ''combining the natural synergy between integrative health and palliative medicine (2020-10-06)
Seagrass restoration speeds recovery of ecosystem services
The reintroduction of seagrass into Virginia's coastal bays is one of the great success stories in marine restoration. (2020-10-07)
Sensory device stimulates ears and tongue to treat tinnitus in large trial
A device that stimulates the ears and tongue substantially reduced the severity of tinnitus symptoms in 326 patients for as long as 1 year, while achieving high patient satisfaction and adherence. (2020-10-07)
Higher suicide risk among older immigrants with untreated depression
The risk of suicide is clearly elevated in the category of older women with untreated depression who were born outside the Nordic region, compared with corresponding Swedish-born women. (2020-10-08)
Setting a TRAP for pandemic-causing viruses
A new laboratory technique quickly sifts through trillions of synthetic proteins to find ones that can target viruses, helping healthcare authorities rapidly respond to evolving pandemics. (2020-10-08)
Minimizing the movement problem in single-particle cryo-EM
While single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has enabled access to structures of proteins that were previously intractable and, most recently, has done much to inform our understanding of SARS-CoV-2 structure, the technique still has some weaknesses. (2020-10-08)
ideas42 and University of Chicago Crime Lab challenge assumptions about missed court dates
Behavioral design nonprofit ideas42 and the University of Chicago Crime Lab announced the publication of their new joint paper, Using Behavioral Nudges to Reduce Failure to Appear in Court in Science Magazine. (2020-10-08)
Children with kidney disease have longer hospital stays
Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often require hospitalization; however, outcomes of this high risk population are unknown. (2020-10-12)
Update on excess deaths from COVID-19, other causes
This study updates a previous report of the estimated number of excess deaths in the U.S. during the COVID-19 pandemic through August 1 and describes causes of those deaths and relationships with lifting of coronavirus restrictions. (2020-10-12)
Enzyme SSH1 impairs disposal of accumulating cellular garbage, leading to brain cell death
The protein p62 plays a major role in clearing misfolded tau proteins and dysfunctional mitochondria, the energy powerhouse in all cells including neurons. (2020-10-12)
On the trail of novel infectious agents in wildlife
A research team led by Kristin Mühldorfer from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and Tobias Eisenberg from the Hessian State Laboratory investigated the causes of severe respiratory disease in peccaries and taxonomically characterised a novel Streptococcus species (Streptococcus catagoni sp. nov.) based on its phenotypic properties and genetic features. (2020-10-13)
Reviving cells after a heart attack
Harvard SEAS researchers have unraveled potential mechanisms behind the healing power of extracellular vesicles and demonstrated their capacity to not only revive cells after a heart attack but keep cells functioning while deprived of oxygen during a heart attack. (2020-10-14)
Bats save energy by reducing energetically costly immune functions during annual migration
A team of scientists led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) investigated whether and how the immune response changes between pre-migration and migration seasons in the Nathusius pipistrelle bat. (2020-10-15)
Results from the cobra-reduce trial reported at TCT Connect
For patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) that also require oral anticoagulation, treatment with a nanotechnology polymer-coated stent plus 14-day dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) did not reduce bleeding or establish non-inferior outcomes for thrombotic events compared with a drug-eluting stent (DES) and standard three or six-month DAPT therapy. (2020-10-17)
Natural disaster preparations may aid businesses' pandemic response
The benefits of preparing for natural disasters may extend to scenarios outside of earthquakes, hurricanes and wildfires. (2020-10-19)
A trillion turns of light nets terahertz polarized bytes
Nanophotonics researchers at Rice University, the Polytechnic University of Milan and the Italian Institute of Technology have demonstrated a novel technique for modulating light at terahertz frequencies with plasmonic metasurfaces. (2020-10-19)
Hubble observes spectacular supernova time-lapse
The NASA/ESA's Hubble Space Telescope has tracked the fading light of a supernova in the spiral galaxy NGC 2525, located 70 million light years away. (2020-10-01)
Surgery for benign breast disease does not impair future breastfeeding capability
Young women with benign breast conditions may undergo surgery without jeopardizing their ability to breastfeed later on. (2020-10-03)
Millimetre-precision drug delivery to the brain
Focused ultrasound waves help ETH researchers to deliver drugs to the brain with pinpoint accuracy, in other words only to where their effect is desired. (2020-10-05)
Muslim young adult mental health before, after presidential election
How the 2016 US presidential election was associated with changes in the mental health of Muslim college students was assessed in this study. (2020-10-05)
Neuroscientists discover a molecular mechanism that allows memories to form
Encoding memories in engram cells is controlled by large-scale remodeling of the proteins and DNA that make up cells' chromatin, according to an MIT study. (2020-10-05)
The world's first successful identification and characterization of in vivo senescent cells
A research team led by Professor Makoto Nakanishi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, generated a p16-Cre ERT2 -tdTomato mouse model to characterize in vivo p16 high cells at the single-cell level. (2020-10-07)
New approach helps EMTs better assess chest pain en route to hospital
A study conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Health shows that on-scene use of a new protocol and advanced diagnostic equipment can help paramedics better identify patients at high risk for adverse cardiac events. (2020-10-07)
Symptoms of COVID-19 are a poor marker of infection, new UK population study shows
86% of UK residents who tested positive for COVID-19 during lockdown did not have the specific virus symptoms (cough, and/or fever, and/or loss of taste/smell), finds a new study by UCL researchers. (2020-10-07)
Blocking immune system pathway may stop COVID-19 infection, prevent severe organ damage
While the world waits eagerly for a safe and effective vaccine to prevent infections from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus behind the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers also are focusing on better understanding how SARS-CoV-2 attacks the body in the search for other means of stopping its devastating impact. (2020-10-08)
Moms report mild to high levels of COVID-19 anxiety and insomnia in study by Ben-Gurion University
The results indicated that maternal clinical insomnia (Insomnia Severity Score > 15) during the COVID?19 pandemic more than doubled to 23% during the pandemic, compared with only 11% before the pandemic. (2020-10-12)
New bioengineering approach to fix fetal membranes
New research led by Queen Mary University of London and UCL has shown that small bioengineered molecules can be used to repair defects in the fetal membranes that surround and protect babies developing in the womb. (2020-10-12)
A new approach to analyzing the morphology of dendritic spines
Dendritic spines are small protrusions from a neuron's dendrite membrane, where contact with neighboring axons is formed to receive synaptic input. (2020-10-12)
Customers prefer partitions over mannequins in socially-distanced dining rooms
Restaurants have had to get creative to enforce social distancing guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic, including utilizing mannequins. (2020-10-12)
Unraveling the network of molecules that influence COVID-19 severity
Researchers from the Morgridge Institute for Research, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Albany Medical College have identified more than 200 molecular features that strongly correlate with COVID-19 severity, offering insight into potential treatment options for those with advanced disease. (2020-10-12)
Study confirms plastics threat to south pacific seabirds
Plastic gathered from remote corners of the South Pacific Ocean, including nesting areas of New Zealand albatrosses, has confirmed the global threat of plastic pollution to seabirds. (2020-10-14)
Penn Medicine researchers use artificial intelligence to 'redefine' Alzheimer's Disease
The researchers will apply advanced artificial intelligence (AI) methods to integrate and find patterns in genetic, imaging, and clinical data from over 60,000 Alzheimer's patients -- representing one of the largest and most ambitious research undertakings of its kind. (2020-10-14)
Machine learning uncovers potential new TB drugs
Using a machine-learning approach that incorporates uncertainty, MIT researchers identified several promising compounds that target a protein required for the survival of the bacteria that cause tuberculosis. (2020-10-15)
The mental health impact of pandemics for front line health care staff
New research shows the impact that pandemics have on the mental health of front-line health care staff. (2020-10-16)
Drug repurposing
University of New Mexico researchers identify three existing drugs with the potential to clear SARS-CoV-2 infections. (2020-10-16)
Results from the DEFINE-FLOW study reported at TCT Connect
A new observational study of deferred lesions following combined fractional flow reserve (FFR) and coronary flow reserve (CFR) assessments found that untreated vessels with abnormal FFR but intact CFR do not have non-inferior outcomes compared to those with an FFR greater than 0.8 and a CFR greater than or equal to two when treated medically. (2020-10-16)
Echo from the past makes rice paddies a good home for wetland plants
Tokyo, Japan - Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University studied the biodiversity of wetland plants over time in rice paddies in the Tone River basin, Japan. (2020-10-17)
Sludge-powered bacteria generate more electricity, faster
A new electroactive bacterium could help fuel wastewater treatment reactors. (2020-10-19)
The 'Goldilocks Day': the perfect day for kids' bone health
Not too little, not too much - Goldilocks' 'just right' approach can now assess children's daily activities as new research from the University of South Australia confirms the best make up of a child's day to maximise bone health and function in children. (2020-10-19)
Advancing wildlife genomics through the development of molecular methods
A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW), the Australian Museum and the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) report a new method for identifying any genome sequence located next to a known sequence. (2020-10-19)
Carbon-carbon covalent bonds far more flexible than presumed
A Hokkaido University research group has successfully demonstrated that carbon-carbon (C-C) covalent bonds expand and contract flexibly in response to light and heat. (2020-10-01)
Genetic tracing 'barcode' is rapidly revealing COVID-19's journey and evolution
Drexel University researchers have reported a method to quickly identify and label mutated versions of the virus that causes COVID-19. (2020-10-02)
Caesarean birth, prolonged labour influence infant gut bacteria, risk of childhood obesity
Events at birth may affect the microbes living in a baby's gut during the first few months of life, leading to a higher risk of childhood obesity and allergies, according to a new study published in the journal Gastroenterology. (2020-10-02)
Evolution: Shifts in mating preference
In their efforts to identify the genetic basis for differences in mate choice that keep two co-existing species of butterfly separate, evolutionary biologists at Ludwig-Maximlians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have identified five candidate genes that are associated with divergence in visual mating preferences. (2020-10-06)
Pesticides and food scarcity dramatically reduce wild bee population
The loss of flowering plants and the widespread use of pesticides could be a double punch to wild bee populations. (2020-10-06)
A diet high in prunes prevents bone loss associated with spinal cord injuries
Findings from a new study among mice show a diet high in dried plum (prunes) completely prevents bone loss associated with spinal cord injury (SCI), while also restoring some of the bone lost following SCI. (2020-10-06)
Many Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma patients can skip radiation, collaborative study finds
Skipping radiation and receiving less chemotherapy may become the new standard of care for some lymphoma patients, according to a recent collaborative University of Arizona Health Sciences-led study. (2020-10-06)
Graphene microbubbles make perfect lenses
Jia and fellow researchers from Swinburne University of Technology recently teamed up with researchers from National University of Singapore, Rutgers University, University of Melbourne, and Monash University, to develop a method to generate precisely controlled graphene microbubbles on a glass surface using laser pulses. (2020-10-09)

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