Nav: Home

Best Science Podcasts (2017)

Our selection of the best science podcasts of 2017. New science podcasts are updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.


TED Radio Hour
The TED Radio Hour is a journey through fascinating ideas: astonishing inventions, fresh approaches to old problems, new ways to think and create. Based on Talks given by riveting speakers on the world-renowned TED stage, each show is centered on a common theme such as the source of happiness, crowd-sourcing innovation, power shifts, or inexplicable connections.

Manipulation
2017-10-12 21:01:14
We think we're the ones who control what we see, read, think and remember. But is that true? Who decides? And who should decide? This hour, TED speakers reveal just how easily we can be manipulated. Guests include design ethicist Tristan Harris, MSNBC host Ali Velshi, psychologist Elizabeth Loftus, and neuroscientist Steve Ramirez.
52 minutes, 29 seconds



Science for the People
Science for the People is a weekly syndicated long-format interview radio show and podcast which explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what is in the news and on the shelves. Every week, our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.

#443 Batteries
2017-10-12 21:00:00
This week on Science for the People we take a deep dive into modern batteries: how they work now and how they might work in the future. We speak with Gerbrand Ceder from UC Berkeley, about the most commonly used batteries today, how they work, and how they could work better. And we talk with Kathryn Toghill, electrochemist from Lancaster University, about redox flow batteries and how they could help make our power grids more sustainable.
1 hour



Radiolab
Radiolab is a show about curiosity. Where sound illuminates ideas, and the boundaries blur between science, philosophy, and human experience. Radiolab is heard around the country on more than 500 member stations.

Father K
2017-10-12 19:59:15
Today, while the divisions between different groups in this country feel more and more insurmountable, we zero in on a particular neighborhood to see if one man can draw people together in a potentially history-making election.  Khader El-Yateem is a Palestinian American running for office in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, one of the most divided, and most conservative neighborhoods in New York City. To win, he'll need to convince a wildly diverse population that he can speak for all of them, and he'll need to pull one particular group of people, Arab American muslims, out of the shadows and into the political process. And to make things just a bit more interesting, El-Yateem is a Lutheran minister. This story was reported and produced by Simon Adler, with help from Bethel Habte, Annie McEwen, and Sarah Qari.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.
1 hour, 11 minutes, 6 seconds



StarTalk Radio
Science meets comedy and pop culture on StarTalk Radio! Astrophysicist and Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson, his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities and scientists discuss astronomy, physics, and everything else about life in the universe.

StarTalk Live! from Future Con: Engineering the Future (Part 2)
2017-10-13 13:45:41
Join us as we continue our journey into the future with former astronaut and ISS Commander Chris Hadfield, co-host Scott Adsit, biorobotics engineer Katherine Pratt, mechanical engineer Suveen Mathaudu, Maeve Higgins, and, via holographic projection, Stephen Hawking. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/startalk-live-from-future-con-engineering-the-future-part-2/
53 minutes, 15 seconds



The Titanium Physicists Podcast
Dr. Ben Tippett and his team of physicists believe that anyone can understand physics. Black Holes! Lightning! Coronal Mass Ejections! Quantum Mechanics! Fortnightly, they explain a topic from advanced physics, using explanations, experiments and fun metaphors to a non-physicist guest.

Episode 74: Jingle Bell Sweaters
2017-08-24 12:56:22
Biophysicists Dr. Nicole Prent and Dr. Jacqueline Townsend are back. this time we're talking about Electron Spin Resonance, a technique that's like Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, but different. our guest this time is Diana Goodman, Host of the 30-20-10 podcast.
48 minutes, 53 seconds



Science and Creativity from Studio 360
Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005.

How Time-Travel Stories Borrow from Einstein
2016-12-19 13:04:07
It's hard to believe, but the words "time" and "travel" were never really linked until H.G. Wells' 1895 novel,  "The Time Machine." James Gleick, author of "Time Travel: A History"  discovered that everything from Mr. Peabody's Wayback Machine to Doc Brown's DeLorean can be traced back to Wells. "He wasn't trying to say anything about science," Gleick says. "In order to tell his story, he invented this gimmick." And "The Time Machine" explained this gimmick with another bit of sci-fi whimsy: that time is the fourth dimension of space. "That was ten years before Einstein's first publication of the special theory of relativity," Gleick says. And once Einstein validated this view of space-time, it inspired countless stories about characters visiting the past and the future.
8 minutes, 14 seconds



The Science Show
RN's science flagship: your essential source of what's making news in the complex world of scientific research, scandal and discovery. The Science Show with Robyn Williams is one of the longest running programs on Australian radio.

DNA robots and heat stress
2017-10-13 18:05:59
Uni of Tasmania's big plans for STEM accessibility DNA robots collect and sort molecules Exploding dots mathematics is visual, playful and powerful - Margaret Wertheim Effects of heat stress on workers and productivity Plastic an increasing problem along coast of Arnhem Land Aquatic worms hitch rides on the hulls of ships The role of music in human evolution and society today
53 minutes, 52 seconds



Science Friday
Covering everything about science and technology -- from the outer reaches of space to the tiniest microbes in our bodies -- Science Friday is your source for entertaining and educational stories and activities. Each week, host Ira Flatow interviews scientists and inventors like Sylvia Earle, Elon Musk, Neil deGrasse Tyson, and more.

Hr2: US Space Goals, Other Worlds
2017-10-13 12:00:00
From other planets to our own future, writers can take us places we’ve never seen. Authors Cory Doctorow, N.K. Jemisin, and Annalee Newitz are among them. Plus, a recent meeting of the National Space Council signaled a shift of U.S. goals in space.
46 minutes, 47 seconds



Big Picture Science
Big Picture Science weaves together a universe of big ideas from robots to memory to antimatter to dinosaurs. Tune in and make contact with science.

Too Big To Prove
2017-10-16 04:29:46
Celebrations are in order for the physicists who won the 2017 Nobel Prize, for the detection of gravitational waves.  But the road to Stockholm was not easy.  Unfolding over a century, it went from doubtful theory to daring experiments and even disrepute.  100 years is a major lag between a theory and its confirmation, and new ideas in physics may take even longer to prove. Why it may be your great, great grandchildren who witness the confirmation of string theory.  Plus, the exciting insights that gravitational waves provide into the phenomena of our universe, beginning with black holes. And, physics has evolved - shouldn't its rewards?  A case for why the Nobel committee should honor collaborative groups rather than individuals, and the scientific breakthroughs it's missed.  Guests:  Janna Levin- Physicist and astronomer at Barnard College at Columbia University, and the author of the story of LIGO, "Black Hole Blues and Other Songs from Outer Space." Roland Pease- BBC reporter, producer, and host of "Science in Action."  David Gross- Theoretical physicist, string theorist, University of California, Santa Barbara, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, winner, 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics. 
52 minutes, 46 seconds



Gastropod
Gastropod looks at food through the lens of science and history. Co-hosts Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley serve up a brand new episode every two weeks.

Eataly World and the Future of Food Shopping
2017-10-09 17:41:10
In just over a month, the world's first theme park devoted entirely to Italian food will open its doors—and Gastropod has the scoop! Among Eataly World's delights will be hunt-your-own truffles, baby lambs, beach volleyball, and custom Bianchi shopping bike-carts. But there's a bigger story, and it's that Oscar Farinetti, the founder of the Eataly ...More →
39 minutes, 17 seconds



The Guardian's Science Weekly
The award winning Science Weekly is the best place to learn about the big discoveries and debates in biology, chemistry, physics, and sometimes even maths. From the Guardian science desk - Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin & Nicola Davis meet the great thinkers and doers in science and technology.

The Party: how can gender affect autism spectrum disorders?
2017-10-12 03:53:37
Why are so many women with autism often misdiagnosed? And how does this issue resonate with broader ideas of neurodiversity?
24 minutes, 22 seconds



Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio
CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks covers the quirks of the expanding universe to the quarks within a single atom... and everything in between.

Zap your brain to get smarter, Divorce genetics, Deep-sea mining, War on coal and Energy East, Zika mutation and Volcanoes under water
2017-10-12 21:00:00
Zap your brain to get smarter, Divorce is genetic, Deep-sea mining, War on coal and Energy East, Zika mutation and Quirks Question - Volcanoes under water.
54 minutes, 46 seconds



Nature Podcast
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to neuroscience, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

Nature Podcast: 12 October 2017
2017-10-11 10:00:00
This week, a dwarf planet with a ring, 40 years of Sanger DNA sequencing, and the grieving families contributing to a huge genetics projects.
39 minutes, 32 seconds



Living Planet
Every Thursday, a new episode of Living Planet brings you environment stories from around the world, digging deeper into topics that touch our lives every day.

Living Planet: Forecasts & expectations
2017-10-12 09:55:00
After a summer of severe weather events, Europeans are asking: Is this the new normal and how do we prepare? Plus, the television show that's got Senegalese excited about farming.
29 minutes, 59 seconds


Best Science Podcasts 2017

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2017. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Manipulation
We think we're the ones who control what we see, read, think and remember. But is that true? Who decides? And who should decide? This hour, TED speakers reveal just how easily we can be manipulated. Guests include design ethicist Tristan Harris, MSNBC host Ali Velshi, psychologist Elizabeth Loftus, and neuroscientist Steve Ramirez.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#443 Batteries
This week on Science for the People we take a deep dive into modern batteries: how they work now and how they might work in the future. We speak with Gerbrand Ceder from UC Berkeley, about the most commonly used batteries today, how they work, and how they could work better. And we talk with Kathryn Toghill, electrochemist from Lancaster University, about redox flow batteries and how they could help make our power grids more sustainable.