Nav: Home

Best Science Podcasts (2018)

Our selection of the best science podcasts of 2018. New science podcasts are updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.


TED Radio Hour
The TED Radio Hour is a journey through fascinating ideas: astonishing inventions, fresh approaches to old problems, new ways to think and create. Based on Talks given by riveting speakers on the world-renowned TED stage, each show is centered on a common theme such as the source of happiness, crowd-sourcing innovation, power shifts, or inexplicable connections.

Hacking The Law
2018-10-11 21:01:18
We have a vision of justice as blind, impartial, and fair — but in reality, the law often fails those who need it most. This hour, TED speakers explore radical ways to change the legal system. Guests include lawyer and social justice advocate Robin Steinberg, animal rights lawyer Steven Wise, political activist Brett Hennig, and lawyer and social entrepreneur Vivek Maru.
52 minutes, 49 seconds



Science for the People
Science for the People is a weekly syndicated long-format interview radio show and podcast which explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what is in the news and on the shelves. Every week, our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.

#495 Earth Science in Space
2018-10-11 21:00:00
Some worlds are made of sand. Some are made of water. Some are even made of salt. In science fiction and fantasy, planet can be made of whatever you want. But what does that mean for how the planets themselves work? When in doubt, throw an asteroid at it. This is a live show recorded at the 2018 Dragon Con in Atlanta Georgia. Featuring Travor Valle, Mika McKinnon, David Moscato, Scott Harris, and moderated by our own Bethany Brookshire. Note: The sound isn't as good as we'd hoped but we love the guests and the conversation and we wanted to...
1 hour



Radiolab
Radiolab is a show about curiosity. Where sound illuminates ideas, and the boundaries blur between science, philosophy, and human experience. Radiolab is heard around the country on more than 500 member stations.

In the No Part 1
2018-10-11 15:00:00
In 2017, radio-maker Kaitlin Prest released a mini-series called "No" about her personal struggle to understand and communicate about sexual consent. That show, which dives into the experience, moment by moment, of navigating sexual intimacy, struck a chord with many of us. It's gorgeous, deeply personal, and incredibly thoughtful. And it seemed to presage a much larger conversation that is happening all around us in this moment. And so we decided to embark, with Kaitlin, on our own exploration of this topic. Over the next three episodes, we'll wander into rooms full of college students, hear from academics and activists, and sit in on classes about BDSM. But to start things off, we are going to share with you the story that started it all. Today, meet Kaitlin (if you haven't already).  In The No Part 1 is a collaboration with Kaitlin Prest. It was produced with help from Becca Bressler. The "No" series, from The Heart was created by writer/director Kaitlin Prest, editors Sharon Mashihi and Mitra Kaboli, assistant producers Ariel Hahn and Phoebe Wang, associate sound design and music composition Shani Aviram. Check out Kaitlin's new show, The Shadows. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
55 minutes, 45 seconds



StarTalk Radio
Science meets comedy and pop culture on StarTalk Radio! Astrophysicist and Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson, his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities and scientists discuss astronomy, physics, and everything else about life in the universe.

The Illusion of Free Will, with Sam Harris
2018-10-12 13:30:00
Neil deGrasse Tyson investigates free will, morality, meditation, psychedelic experiences, artificial intelligence, and more alongside neuroscientist and author Sam Harris, comic co-host Godfrey, neurotheologist Andrew Newberg, and neuroscientist Robert Wright. You have no choice but to listen. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/the-illusion-of-free-will-with-sam-harris/ Photo Credit: Brandon Royal.
50 minutes



The Titanium Physicists Podcast
Dr. Ben Tippett and his team of physicists believe that anyone can understand physics. Black Holes! Lightning! Coronal Mass Ejections! Quantum Mechanics! Fortnightly, they explain a topic from advanced physics, using explanations, experiments and fun metaphors to a non-physicist guest.

Episode 78 The Heat Death of The Universe
2018-09-09 17:00:32
Dr. Katie Mack and Dr. Robert McNees team up to explain the heat death of the universe to Award Winning Author Ken Liu.  listen past the closing song for more fun.
1 hour, 14 minutes, 59 seconds



Science and Creativity from Studio 360
Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005.

How Time-Travel Stories Borrow from Einstein
2016-12-19 13:04:07
It's hard to believe, but the words "time" and "travel" were never really linked until H.G. Wells' 1895 novel,  "The Time Machine." James Gleick, author of "Time Travel: A History"  discovered that everything from Mr. Peabody's Wayback Machine to Doc Brown's DeLorean can be traced back to Wells. "He wasn't trying to say anything about science," Gleick says. "In order to tell his story, he invented this gimmick." And "The Time Machine" explained this gimmick with another bit of sci-fi whimsy: that time is the fourth dimension of space. "That was ten years before Einstein's first publication of the special theory of relativity," Gleick says. And once Einstein validated this view of space-time, it inspired countless stories about characters visiting the past and the future.
8 minutes, 14 seconds



The Science Show
RN's science flagship: your essential source of what's making news in the complex world of scientific research, scandal and discovery. The Science Show with Robyn Williams is one of the longest running programs on Australian radio.

Killing Tsar Nicholas
2018-10-12 18:05:36
Photos and science unveil life and murder of Russia's last Tsar Oceans move heat and carbon dioxide around the globe The Economist - where science is never bumped by celebrities Quantum mechanics explains some biological processes Neutrinos may help solve long-standing mysteries of the universe.
54 minutes, 17 seconds



Science Friday
Covering everything about science and technology -- from the outer reaches of space to the tiniest microbes in our bodies -- Science Friday is your source for entertaining and educational stories and activities. Each week, host Ira Flatow interviews scientists and inventors like Sylvia Earle, Elon Musk, Neil deGrasse Tyson, and more.

Squirrel Monkeys, Salmon Migration, The Realness. Oct 12, 2018, Part 2
2018-10-12 14:17:29
Squirrel monkeys have big brains for their size, they're chatterboxes, and they've even been to space. There may even be parallels between squirrel monkey communication and the evolution of human language, says primatologist Anita Stone. She joins Ira to translate the culture of our primate cousins, and talks about what they can teach us about ourselves. To be a salmon is to live an adventurous life: They hatch in freshwater streams, travel miles downstream to the ocean, and live years dodging predators in the open sea. But in order to reproduce, they must return back to that mountain stream, however far away. Research in 2014 confirmed that Pacific salmon can sense and respond to the Earth's magnetic field—and that's at least one component of how they find their home river. Now, a group of Atlantic salmon, descended from a group that's spent 60 years in a landlocked lake, has also demonstrated this ability. Lead author Michelle Scanlon, a faculty research assistant in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University, explains the implications of this behavior for both wild Atlantic salmon and in populations kept, as many are, in fish farms nationwide. Plus: anthropologist Heather McKillop uncovered clues of a vast Mayan salt production system off the coast of Belize that may have been used to preserve fish and a place for trade. McKillop tells us how the Maya may have produced salt, and what this reveals about the economy of the civilization. And "The Realness," a new podcast from WNYC Studios, tells the story of America's relationship to sickle cell through Prodigy's life, and death, from the disease.  
46 minutes, 55 seconds



Big Picture Science
Big Picture Science weaves together a universe of big ideas from robots to memory to antimatter to dinosaurs. Tune in and make contact with science.

DNA is Not Destiny
2018-10-15 08:29:44
Heredity was once thought to be straightforward.  Genes were passed in an immutable path from parents to you, and you were stuck - or blessed - with what you got.  DNA didn't change.  But now we know that's not true.   Epigenetic factors, such as your environment and your lifestyle, control how your genes are expressed.  Meanwhile, the powerful tool CRISPR allows us to tinker with the genes themselves.  DNA is no longer destiny. Hear the results from the NASA twin study and what happened to astronaut Scott Kelly's DNA after a year on the International Space Station.  Plus, whether there's evidence that epigenetic changes can be passed down.  And, if we can wipe out deadly malaria by engineering the mosquito genome for sterility, should we do it? Guests: Scott Kelly - Former military test pilot and astronaut and author of "Infinite Wonder" Carl Zimmer - Columnist for The New York Times, author of "She Has Her Mother's Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity" Christopher Mason - Associate professor of genetics and computational biology at Weill Cornell Medicine Michael Snyder - Chair of the genetics department and director of the Center for Genomics and Precision Medicine at Stanford University Nicole Gladish - PhD candidate, department of medical genetics, University of British Columbia
51 minutes, 4



Gastropod
Gastropod looks at food through the lens of science and history. Co-hosts Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley serve up a brand new episode every two weeks.

Espresso and Whisky: The Place of Time in Food
2018-10-08 20:06:14
Why does fish cook so fast? What's the "wasabi window"? And can you really make 20-year-old aged whisky in six days? This episode, we're looking at the role of time in food and flavor: what it does, and how we've tried—and sometimes succeeded—to manipulate that. To explore these questions, we visit a whisky time machine tucked ...More → The post Espresso and Whisky: The Place of Time in Food appeared first on Gastropod.
Not Available



The Guardian's Science Weekly
The award winning Science Weekly is the best place to learn about the big discoveries and debates in biology, chemistry, physics, and sometimes even maths. From the Guardian science desk - Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin & Nicola Davis meet the great thinkers and doers in science and technology.

A step in the right direction: could implants help people walk again?
2018-10-11 23:00:23
Four people with paraplegia were recently implanted with electrodes in their lower backs. They all regained movement below their injuries, and two walked again. This week Nicola Davis investigates this technique - epidural stimulation - and other approaches for treating spinal cord injuries
25 minutes, 55 seconds



Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio
CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks covers the quirks of the expanding universe to the quarks within a single atom... and everything in between.

The Great Canadian Ganja Experiment - The Science of Cannabis: Quirks & Quarks explores the questions researchers want to answer with the dawn of legal recreational use
2018-10-12 09:00:00
Cannabis and the brain: the knowns and the big unknowns; What's in a pot plant? Exploring the genes of your favourite ganja; Cultivating cannabis: Five tips on how to grow your own a bit better at home; Cannabis in a van: American researchers get creative to study high-potency products; Addiction and cannabis: it's real and this is what you need to know about it.
54 minutes, 25 seconds



Nature Podcast
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to neuroscience, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

11 October 2018: The life of a new Nobel laureate and organised ants
2018-10-10 10:00:00
This week, what life is like when you've just won a Nobel prize, and how a vestigial organ helps ants get organised.
22 minutes, 56 seconds



Living Planet
Every Thursday, a new episode of Living Planet brings you environment stories from around the world, digging deeper into topics that touch our lives every day.

Living Planet: Plastic pollution and us
2018-10-11 09:55:00
Plastic — are we addicted? We look at our relationship with plastic pollution — and in the spirit of recycling, we're highlighting some best-ofs from previous coverage and looking at plastic-free living, reloaded.
29 minutes, 59 seconds


Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Hacking The Law
We have a vision of justice as blind, impartial, and fair — but in reality, the law often fails those who need it most. This hour, TED speakers explore radical ways to change the legal system. Guests include lawyer and social justice advocate Robin Steinberg, animal rights lawyer Steven Wise, political activist Brett Hennig, and lawyer and social entrepreneur Vivek Maru.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#495 Earth Science in Space
Some worlds are made of sand. Some are made of water. Some are even made of salt. In science fiction and fantasy, planet can be made of whatever you want. But what does that mean for how the planets themselves work? When in doubt, throw an asteroid at it. This is a live show recorded at the 2018 Dragon Con in Atlanta Georgia. Featuring Travor Valle, Mika McKinnon, David Moscato, Scott Harris, and moderated by our own Bethany Brookshire. Note: The sound isn't as good as we'd hoped but we love the guests and the conversation and we wanted to...