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Best Science Podcasts (2018)

Our selection of the best science podcasts of 2018. New science podcasts are updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.


TED Radio Hour
The TED Radio Hour is a journey through fascinating ideas: astonishing inventions, fresh approaches to old problems, new ways to think and create. Based on Talks given by riveting speakers on the world-renowned TED stage, each show is centered on a common theme such as the source of happiness, crowd-sourcing innovation, power shifts, or inexplicable connections.

The Right To Speak
2018-07-26 21:01:17
Should all speech, even the most offensive, be allowed on college campuses? And is hearing from those we deeply disagree with ... worth it? This hour, TED speakers explore the debate over free speech. Guests include recent college graduate Zachary Wood, political scientist Jeffrey Howard, novelist Elif Shafak, and journalist and author James Kirchick.
52 minutes, 1



Science for the People
Science for the People is a weekly syndicated long-format interview radio show and podcast which explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what is in the news and on the shelves. Every week, our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.

#486 Volcanoes
2018-08-09 21:00:00
This week we're talking volcanoes. Because there are few things that fascinate us more than the amazing, unstoppable power of an erupting volcano. First, Jessica Johnson takes us through the latest activity from the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii to help us understand what's happening with this headline-grabbing volcano. And Janine Krippner joins us to highlight some of the lesser-known volcanoes that can be found in the USA, the different kinds of eruptions we might one day see at them, and how damaging they have the potential to be. Related links: Kilauea status report at USGS A beginner's guide to Hawaii's otherworldly...
1 hour



Radiolab
Radiolab is a show about curiosity. Where sound illuminates ideas, and the boundaries blur between science, philosophy, and human experience. Radiolab is heard around the country on more than 500 member stations.

The Bad Show
2018-07-27 18:00:00
With all of the black-and-white moralizing in our world today, we decided to bring back an old show about the little bit of bad that's in all of us...and the little bit of really, really bad that's in some of us.   Cruelty, violence, badness... in this episode we begin with a chilling statistic: 91% of men, and 84% of women, have fantasized about killing someone. We take a look at one particular fantasy lurking behind these numbers, and wonder what this shadow world might tell us about ourselves and our neighbors. Then, we reconsider what Stanley Milgram's famous experiment really revealed about human nature (it's both better and worse than we thought). Next, we meet a man who scrambles our notions of good and evil: chemist Fritz Haber, who won a Nobel Prize in 1918...around the same time officials in the US were calling him a war criminal. And we end with the story of a man who chased one of the most prolific serial killers in US history, then got a chance to ask him the question that had haunted him for years: why? This episode was produced with help from Carter Hodge. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
1 hour, 9 minutes, 15 seconds



StarTalk Radio
Science meets comedy and pop culture on StarTalk Radio! Astrophysicist and Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson, his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities and scientists discuss astronomy, physics, and everything else about life in the universe.

Katy Perry's Cosmic Curiosity
2018-08-10 15:00:14
Extraterrestrials, prisms, music, scientific curiosity, the pursuit of knowledge, and more - Neil deGrasse Tyson and pop music superstar Katy Perry discuss their shared love of the universe. Featuring comic co-host Sasheer Zamata and astrophysicist Charles Liu. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/katy-perrys-cosmic-curiosity/ Photo Credit: Jon Betz.
53 minutes, 47 seconds



The Titanium Physicists Podcast
Dr. Ben Tippett and his team of physicists believe that anyone can understand physics. Black Holes! Lightning! Coronal Mass Ejections! Quantum Mechanics! Fortnightly, they explain a topic from advanced physics, using explanations, experiments and fun metaphors to a non-physicist guest.

Episode 77: Disruptive Feedback
2018-02-18 21:05:26
A supermassive blackhole at the centre of a galaxy can cause the gas that falls into it to glow SO BRIGHT that it stops the creation of new stars. What? How? it's called a quasar. It's called an Active Galactic Nucleus. It's called a good time. Courtney Brooke Davis is here to ask the questions! Dr. Victoria Scowcroft and Dr. Carolin Villforth are here to give the answers!  and I'm here to talk about pudding. 
55 minutes, 44 seconds



Science and Creativity from Studio 360
Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005.

How Time-Travel Stories Borrow from Einstein
2016-12-19 13:04:07
It's hard to believe, but the words "time" and "travel" were never really linked until H.G. Wells' 1895 novel,  "The Time Machine." James Gleick, author of "Time Travel: A History"  discovered that everything from Mr. Peabody's Wayback Machine to Doc Brown's DeLorean can be traced back to Wells. "He wasn't trying to say anything about science," Gleick says. "In order to tell his story, he invented this gimmick." And "The Time Machine" explained this gimmick with another bit of sci-fi whimsy: that time is the fourth dimension of space. "That was ten years before Einstein's first publication of the special theory of relativity," Gleick says. And once Einstein validated this view of space-time, it inspired countless stories about characters visiting the past and the future.
8 minutes, 14 seconds



The Science Show
RN's science flagship: your essential source of what's making news in the complex world of scientific research, scandal and discovery. The Science Show with Robyn Williams is one of the longest running programs on Australian radio.

It's alive!!!
2018-08-10 19:05:56
It's alive!!!
54 minutes, 16 seconds



Science Friday
Covering everything about science and technology -- from the outer reaches of space to the tiniest microbes in our bodies -- Science Friday is your source for entertaining and educational stories and activities. Each week, host Ira Flatow interviews scientists and inventors like Sylvia Earle, Elon Musk, Neil deGrasse Tyson, and more.

Parch Marks, Wildfires, The Beatles. August 10, 2018, Part 1
2018-08-10 15:46:13
The Mendocino Complex fire in northern California has spread to more than 300,000 acres—a swath of land bigger than New York City. The blaze is the state's largest wildfire in recorded history, edging out last year's record-setting Thomas Fire, which devastated communities north of Los Angeles. While climate change is certainly to blame in fanning the flames of wildfires (by boosting temperatures, parching landscapes, and causing more erratic rainfall) there's another factor that's making today's fires increasingly dangerous: a nearly 1,400 percent increase in the number of people building homes in harm's way since the 1940s. Stephen Strader of Villanova University, Jon Keeley of the U.S. Geological Survey, and Erin Questad of Cal Poly Pomona join Ira to talk about people in the way of fire—and how we can nurse those ecosystems back to health. If you had a number one hit song, you would probably remember writing it. John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote over 200 songs together over 50 years ago. So it's no surprise that memories have gotten a little fuzzy when it comes to who wrote which Beatles song. Mark Glickman, senior lecturer in statistics at Harvard University and Beatles super-fan, developed an algorithm to determine the authorship of "In My Life" and several other contested Beatles songs. He (and his guitar) join Ira to discuss his findings. Plus: It's been hot in the United Kingdom this summer. But as lawns parch and grasses turn brown, the landscape is also revealing the buried remains of valuable archaeological finds. Aerial archaeologist Robert Bewley, at Oxford University, describes how "parch marks" can reveal hidden treasures. And Vox staff writer Umair Irfan joins Ira to discuss what the researchers discovered about the benefits—and downsides—of a future geoengineered climate, and other science headlines in this week's News Round-up.  
46 minutes, 41 seconds



Big Picture Science
Big Picture Science weaves together a universe of big ideas from robots to memory to antimatter to dinosaurs. Tune in and make contact with science.

It's Habitable Forming
2018-08-13 06:25:58
There's evidence for a subsurface lake on Mars, and scientists are excitedly using the "h" word.  Could the Red Planet be habitable, not billions of years ago, but today?  While we wait - impatiently - for a confirmation of this result, we review the recipe for habitable alien worlds. For example, the moon Titan has liquid lakes on its surface.  Could they be filled with Titanites? Dive into a possible briny, underground lake on Mars ... protect yourself from the methane-drenched rain on a moon of Saturn ... and cheer on the missed-it-by-that-much planets, asteroids Ceres and Vesta. Also, do tens of billions of potentially habitable extrasolar planets mean that Earth is not unique? Guests: Nathalie Cabrol - Planetary scientist, Director of the Carl Sagan Center for the Study of Life in the Universe at the SETI Institute Jack Holt - Geophysicist, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona Jani Radebaugh - Planetary scientist and professor of geology, Brigham Young University Marc Rayman -  Mission Director and Chief Engineer of NASA's Dawn Mission Phil Plait - Astronomer, blogger, and widely known as the Bad Astronomer
50 minutes, 31 seconds



Gastropod
Gastropod looks at food through the lens of science and history. Co-hosts Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley serve up a brand new episode every two weeks.

Watch It Wiggle: The Jell-O Story
2018-08-13 20:01:28
It's been described as the ultimate status symbol for the wealthy, as the perfect solution for dieters and the sick, and, confusingly, as a liquid trapped in a solid that somehow remains fluid. What could this magical substance be? In case you haven't guessed, this episode, we're talking about Jell-O! Or, to be more precise, ...More → The post Watch It Wiggle: The Jell-O Story appeared first on Gastropod.
Not Available



The Guardian's Science Weekly
The award winning Science Weekly is the best place to learn about the big discoveries and debates in biology, chemistry, physics, and sometimes even maths. From the Guardian science desk - Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin & Nicola Davis meet the great thinkers and doers in science and technology.

Biomimicry: Does nature do it better? - podcast
2018-08-09 22:00:29
In this special collaboration between the Guardian's Science Weekly and Chips with Everything podcasts, we explore why it's so hard to mimic nature
24 minutes, 57 seconds



Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio
CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks covers the quirks of the expanding universe to the quarks within a single atom... and everything in between.

August 11, 2018 - Climate change attribution for extreme weather, cockpit air quality, and more Also, predicting adult voices from baby cries, island bird brains bigger than mainland birds, and lobster pain
2018-08-10 08:59:00
'Climate change is here' - but is it to blame for the extreme weather this summer? Why the airline industry might want to lower cockpit CO2 levels. A baby's cries can predict the sound of their adult voice. Island birds would likely beat their mainland relatives in a battle of wits. Do lobsters feel pain when we boil them? Why does eating beets make my urine turn pink?
54 minutes, 58 seconds



Nature Podcast
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to neuroscience, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

8 August 2018: Fox aggression, microbiota and geoengineering
2018-08-08 10:00:00
This week, shaping the gut microbiota, geoengineering's effect on farming, and the genetics of fox aggression.
27 minutes, 2 seconds



Living Planet
Every Thursday, a new episode of Living Planet brings you environment stories from around the world, digging deeper into topics that touch our lives every day.

Living Planet: Water, H2O, source of life
2018-08-09 09:55:00
Without water, there is no life. Water conservationist Rajendra Singh is bringing dead streams back to life in India. Thousands of dead fish have turned up in the Rhine River in Switzerland — fish are vulnerable to high temperatures as their environment heats up. And, an entrepreneur wants to drag icebergs all the way to South Africa!
29 minutes, 59 seconds


Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

The Right To Speak
Should all speech, even the most offensive, be allowed on college campuses? And is hearing from those we deeply disagree with ... worth it? This hour, TED speakers explore the debate over free speech. Guests include recent college graduate Zachary Wood, political scientist Jeffrey Howard, novelist Elif Shafak, and journalist and author James Kirchick.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#486 Volcanoes
This week we're talking volcanoes. Because there are few things that fascinate us more than the amazing, unstoppable power of an erupting volcano. First, Jessica Johnson takes us through the latest activity from the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii to help us understand what's happening with this headline-grabbing volcano. And Janine Krippner joins us to highlight some of the lesser-known volcanoes that can be found in the USA, the different kinds of eruptions we might one day see at them, and how damaging they have the potential to be. Related links: Kilauea status report at USGS A beginner's guide to Hawaii's otherworldly...