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Best Science Podcasts (2019)

Our selection of the best science podcasts of 2019. New science podcasts are updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.


TED Radio Hour
The TED Radio Hour is a journey through fascinating ideas: astonishing inventions, fresh approaches to old problems, new ways to think and create. Based on Talks given by riveting speakers on the world-renowned TED stage, each show is centered on a common theme such as the source of happiness, crowd-sourcing innovation, power shifts, or inexplicable connections.

Anthropomorphic
2019-08-15 21:01:00
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
51 minutes, 45 seconds



Science for the People
Science for the People is a weekly syndicated long-format interview radio show and podcast which explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what is in the news and on the shelves. Every week, our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
2019-09-12 21:00:00
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...
1 hour



Radiolab
Radiolab is a show about curiosity. Where sound illuminates ideas, and the boundaries blur between science, philosophy, and human experience. Radiolab is heard around the country on more than 500 member stations.

Tit for Tat
2019-09-17 18:06:41
In the early 60s, Robert Axelrod was a math major messing around with refrigerator-sized computers. Then a dramatic global crisis made him wonder about the space between a rock and a hard place, and whether being good may be a good strategy. With help from Andrew Zolli and Steve Strogatz, we tackle the prisoner's dilemma, a classic thought experiment, and learn about a simple strategy to navigate the waters of cooperation and betrayal. Then Axelrod, along with Stanley Weintraub, takes us back to the trenches of World War I, to the winter of 1914, and an unlikely Christmas party along the Western Front.    
28 minutes, 44 seconds



StarTalk Radio
Science meets comedy and pop culture on StarTalk Radio! Astrophysicist and Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson, his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities and scientists discuss astronomy, physics, and everything else about life in the universe.

The Pursuit of Knowledge, with Larry King
2019-09-13 12:46:35
Neil deGrasse Tyson and broadcast icon Larry King explore Larry's approach to interviews, his life-long pursuit of knowledge, and more. Featuring comic co-host Chuck Nice, neuroscientist Heather Berlin, PhD, and media scholar Robert Thompson, PhD. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons and All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Thanks to this week's Patrons for supporting us: Natalie Rosa, Scott Saponas, Jose Clark, Christopher Cohen, Sergio Rizzuto, Michael Staples Photo Credit: National Geographic. 
50 minutes, 17 seconds



The Titanium Physicists Podcast
Dr. Ben Tippett and his team of physicists believe that anyone can understand physics. Black Holes! Lightning! Coronal Mass Ejections! Quantum Mechanics! Fortnightly, they explain a topic from advanced physics, using explanations, experiments and fun metaphors to a non-physicist guest.

Episode 80: Picturing the Bach Hole
2019-08-20 22:46:37
Adal Rifai from "Hello From the Magic Tavern" joins us to talk about the first PHOTOGRAPH of a black hole by the Event Horizon Telescope.  Our guide through this amazing story are Dr. Leo Stein and Dr. Katie Bouman.  We learn the basics of Black holes, and the interferometry performed by the Event Horizon Telescope, and then about the complicated image processing which needed to be done to interpret all of that amazing, messy data!
1 hour, 34 minutes, 35 seconds



Science and Creativity from Studio 360
Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005.

How Time-Travel Stories Borrow from Einstein
2016-12-19 13:04:07
It's hard to believe, but the words "time" and "travel" were never really linked until H.G. Wells' 1895 novel,  "The Time Machine." James Gleick, author of "Time Travel: A History"  discovered that everything from Mr. Peabody's Wayback Machine to Doc Brown's DeLorean can be traced back to Wells. "He wasn't trying to say anything about science," Gleick says. "In order to tell his story, he invented this gimmick." And "The Time Machine" explained this gimmick with another bit of sci-fi whimsy: that time is the fourth dimension of space. "That was ten years before Einstein's first publication of the special theory of relativity," Gleick says. And once Einstein validated this view of space-time, it inspired countless stories about characters visiting the past and the future.
8 minutes, 14 seconds



The Science Show
RN's science flagship: your essential source of what's making news in the complex world of scientific research, scandal and discovery. The Science Show with Robyn Williams is one of the longest running programs on Australian radio.

The Magic of Mushrooms
2019-09-13 19:05:00
Magic Mushrooms: Can their mycelia give us safer plastic replacements?
54 minutes, 11 seconds



Science Friday
Covering everything about science and technology -- from the outer reaches of space to the tiniest microbes in our bodies -- Science Friday is your source for entertaining and educational stories and activities. Each week, host Ira Flatow interviews scientists and inventors like Sylvia Earle, Elon Musk, Neil deGrasse Tyson, and more.

The Center Of The Milky Way, Rats At Play, And Geometry. Sept 13, 2019, Part 2
2019-09-13 13:59:35
The Greek mathematician Euclid imagined an ordered and methodical universe, but his vision struggled to catch on for centuries, until Renaissance painters and French monarchs found a way connect the ancient science of geometry to the real world. Science historian Amir Alexander joins Ira to share the story of geometry's rising global influence in his new book Proof!: How The World Became Geometrical.  Plus, a million years ago, the black hole at the center of our galaxy burped. Now, scientists are exploring what the resulting bubbles might say about our kinship with other galaxies. And here on Earth, neuroscientists say they can learn a lot by observing brains at play—particularly those of rats playing hide and seek.
46 minutes, 56 seconds



Big Picture Science
Big Picture Science weaves together a universe of big ideas from robots to memory to antimatter to dinosaurs. Tune in and make contact with science.

For Good Measure
2019-09-09 07:53:48
The reign of Le Grand K has come to an end. After 130 years, this hunk of metal sitting in a Parisian vault will no longer define the kilogram. The new kilogram mass will be defined by Planck's constant, joining three other units for redefinition by fundamental constants.  But as we measure with increasing precision - from cesium atomic clocks to gravitational wave detectors able to measure spacetime distortions to 1/1000th the width of a proton - is something fundamental lost along the way?  Meanwhile, the BiPiSci team accepts the banana-measurement challenge. Guests: Jon Pratt - Mechanical engineer and engineer and Chief of the Quantum Measurement Division of the Physical Measurement Laboratory (PML) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Wolfgang Ketterle - Physicist at MIT, Nobel Laureate Simon Winchester - Author of "The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World"
52 minutes, 34 seconds



Gastropod
Gastropod looks at food through the lens of science and history. Co-hosts Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley serve up a brand new episode every two weeks.

Celebrate Mexico's True National Holiday with the Mysteries of Mole
2019-09-10 13:27:28
In the United States, Cinco de Mayo is an excuse for margarita-fueled partying. But in Mexico, that date—the anniversary of a military triumph over Napoleon on May 5, 1862—is marked by a parade and not much else. The real celebrations happen on September 16, which is Mexican Independence Day. At Gastropod, we're always down to ...More → The post Celebrate Mexico's True National Holiday with the Mysteries of Mole appeared first on Gastropod.
Not Available



The Guardian's Science Weekly
The award winning Science Weekly is the best place to learn about the big discoveries and debates in biology, chemistry, physics, and sometimes even maths. From the Guardian science desk - Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin & Nicola Davis meet the great thinkers and doers in science and technology.

How to find life beyond Earth
2019-09-13 04:00:24
As scientists at University College London announce the discovery of water in the atmosphere of a potentially habitable 'super Earth', Ian Sample explores our prospects for finding life beyond our own planet. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod">theguardian.com/sciencepod</a>
35 minutes, 18 seconds



Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio
CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks covers the quirks of the expanding universe to the quarks within a single atom... and everything in between.

Ground zero for dinosaur extinction, space archeology, toes on the brain, Finding a lost jet engine on Greenland, mystery of the wandering whales and barren tablelands
2019-09-13 09:00:00
Rocks recovered from ground zero reveal how the dinosaurs died; Archaeology from space - discovering history from a few hundred kilometres up; A jumbo jet lost an engine over Greenland — these researchers found it; The toes of foot painters are mapped in the brain as if they were fingers; Why are right whales roaming into danger off the East coast?; Why are the Tablelands of Gros Morne National Park barren?
54 minutes, 11 seconds



Nature Podcast
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to neuroscience, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.

04 July 2019: Machine learning in materials science, and sand's sustainability
2019-07-03 10:01:30
This week, using an algorithm to find properties in materials science, and the global consequences of sand-mining. In this episode: 00:47 Predicting properties A word-association algorithm is reading millions of abstracts to discover new properties of materials.  Research article: Tshitoyan et al.; News and Views: Text mining facilitates materials discovery 08:28 Research Highlights Tiny robot-jellyfish, and genome mutation hot-spots.  Research Article:Multi-functional soft-bodied jellyfish-like swimming; Research Highlight:How DNA 'hotspots' snarl the search for cancer genes 10:48 Sand under strain Researchers warn that the mining of sand is unsustainable.  Comment:Time is running out for sand 15:44 News Chat The results of a bullying survey, and the spread of microbial disease through opioid use.  News: Germany's prestigious Max Planck Society conducts huge bullying survey; News: The US opioid epidemic is driving a spike in infectious diseases For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
23 minutes, 6 seconds



Living Planet
Every Thursday, a new episode of Living Planet brings you environment stories from around the world, digging deeper into topics that touch our lives every day.

Living Planet: Given Half a Chance
2019-09-12 07:00:00
The dilemma of our times — our fast-moving, convenient lifestyles are polluting the planet and heating up the climate. Could a plastic-free supermarket — or a recycling app help solve some of our problems? Author Edward Davey says there is hope and suggests "Ten Ways to Change the World" in his book "Given Half a Chance."
29 minutes, 56 seconds


Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...