Nav: Home

Punishing Disease: HIV and the Criminalization of Sickness | Paperback

by Trevor Hoppe (Author)


List Price: $32.95  
Price:  $27.70
You Save:  $5.25 (16%)
Available:  Usually ships in 24 hours
FREE Shipping on Qualified Orders
» View Details


Binding:  Paperback
Publisher:  University of California Press
Edition:  Firstth Edition
Page Count:  288 Pages
Publication Date:  November 10, 2017
Sales Rank:  1468120th



EDITORIAL REVIEWS


Product Description
From the very beginning of the epidemic, AIDS was linked to punishment. Calls to punish people living with HIV—mostly stigmatized minorities—began before doctors had even settled on a name for the disease. Punishing Disease looks at how HIV was transformed from sickness to badness under the criminal law and investigates the consequences of inflicting penalties on people living with disease. Now that the door to criminalizing sickness is open, what other ailments will follow? With moves in state legislatures to extend HIV-specific criminal laws to include diseases such as hepatitis and meningitis, the question is more than academic.

SIMILAR PRODUCTS


Sociology of Deviant Behavior

Sociology of Deviant Behavior
by Marshall B. Clinard (Author), Robert F. Meier (Author)

Looking for a textbook with simplified terminology and endless study helps? SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANT BEHAVIOR hits the hot topics from terrorism to white-collar crime and shows you how sociological theory explains them. Now in its 13th edition, this textbook continues to be the best of its kind on the market.
The Life and Death of ACT UP/LA: Anti-AIDS Activism in Los Angeles from the 1980s to the 2000s

The Life and Death of ACT UP/LA: Anti-AIDS Activism in Los Angeles from the 1980s to the 2000s
by Benita Roth (Author)

The Life and Death of ACT UP/LA explores the history of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, Los Angeles, part of the militant anti-AIDS movement of the 1980s and 1990s. ACT UP/LA battled government, medical, and institutional neglect of the AIDS epidemic, engaging in multi-targeted protest in Los Angeles and nationally. The book shows how appealing the direct action anti-AIDS activism was for people across the United States; as well as arguing the need to understand how the politics of place...
Challenging Operations: Medical Reform and Resistance in Surgery

Challenging Operations: Medical Reform and Resistance in Surgery
by Katherine C. Kellogg (Author)

In 2003, in the face of errors and accidents caused by medical and surgical trainees, the American Council of Graduate Medical Education mandated a reduction in resident work hours to eighty per week. Over the course of two and a half years spent observing residents and staff surgeons trying to implement this new regulation, Katherine C. Kellogg discovered that resistance to it was both strong and successful—in fact, two of the three hospitals she studied failed to make the change....

The Right to Maim: Debility, Capacity, Disability (ANIMA: Critical Race Studies Otherwise)

The Right to Maim: Debility, Capacity, Disability (ANIMA: Critical Race Studies Otherwise)
by Jasbir K. Puar (Author)

In The Right to Maim Jasbir K. Puar brings her pathbreaking work on the liberal state, sexuality, and biopolitics to bear on our understanding of disability. Drawing on a stunning array of theoretical and methodological frameworks, Puar uses the concept of “debility”—bodily injury and social exclusion brought on by economic and political factors—to disrupt the category of disability. She shows how debility, disability, and capacity together constitute an assemblage that states...
Infectious Ideas: U.S. Political Responses to the AIDS Crisis

Infectious Ideas: U.S. Political Responses to the AIDS Crisis
by Jennifer Brier (Author)

Viewing contemporary history from the perspective of the AIDS crisis, Jennifer Brier provides rich, new understandings of the United States' complex social and political trends in the post-1960s era. Brier describes how AIDS workers--in groups as disparate as the gay and lesbian press, AIDS service organizations, private philanthropies, and the State Department--influenced American politics, especially on issues such as gay and lesbian rights, reproductive health, racial justice, and health...
After Silence: A History of AIDS through Its Images

After Silence: A History of AIDS through Its Images
by Avram Finkelstein (Author)

Early in the 1980s AIDS epidemic, six gay activists created one of the most iconic and lasting images that would come to symbolize a movement: a protest poster of a pink triangle with the words “Silence = Death.” The graphic and the slogan still resonate today, often used—and misused—to brand the entire movement. Cofounder of the collective Silence = Death and member of the art collective Gran Fury, Avram Finkelstein tells the story of how his work and other protest artwork associated...
Mobilizing New York: AIDS, Antipoverty, and Feminist Activism (Gender and American Culture)

Mobilizing New York: AIDS, Antipoverty, and Feminist Activism (Gender and American Culture)
by Tamar W. Carroll (Author)

Examining three interconnected case studies, Tamar Carroll powerfully demonstrates the ability of grassroots community activism to bridge racial and cultural differences and effect social change. Drawing on a rich array of oral histories, archival records, newspapers, films, and photographs from post–World War II New York City, Carroll shows how poor people transformed the antipoverty organization Mobilization for Youth and shaped the subsequent War on Poverty. Highlighting the little-known...
AIDS and Accusation: Haiti and the Geography of Blame, Updated with a New Preface

AIDS and Accusation: Haiti and the Geography of Blame, Updated with a New Preface
by Paul Farmer (Author)

Does the scientific “theory” that HIV came to North America from Haiti stem from underlying attitudes of racism and ethnocentrism in the United States rather than from hard evidence? Award-winning author and anthropologist-physician Paul Farmer answers with this, the first full-length ethnographic study of AIDS in a poor society. First published in 1992 this new edition has been updated and a new preface added.
Inventing AIDS

Inventing AIDS
by Cindy Patton (Author)

In a unique combination of personal experience and analysis, AIDS activist Cindy Patton offers a disturbing critique of the commitments of scientific knowledge as they relate to the AIDS epidemic, often conflicting with the human needs of HIV/AIDS patients. She shows how rigid scientific beliefs foster inadequate and discriminatory educational practices, and considers the effects of scientific information on the formulation of public health policies and political strategies.

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Attention Please
In an age of constant information and infinite distractions, how can we pay more attention to our ... attention? This hour, TED speakers explore the battle for our awareness during the digital age. Guests include sociologist Zeynep Tufekci, podcast host Manoush Zomorodi, neuroscientist Amishi Jha, designer Tristan Harris, and computer scientist Jaron Lanier.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#475 Mother Nature is Trying to Kill You (Rebroadcast)
This week, we're learning how deadly and delightful our planet and its ecosystem can be. We're joined by biologist Dan Riskin, co-host of Discovery Canada's Daily Planet, to talk about his book "Mother Nature Is Trying to Kill You: a Lively Tour Through the Dark Side of the Natural World." And we'll talk to astronomer and author Phil Plait about Science Getaways, his company that offers educational vacation experiences for science lovers.