Nav: Home

Punishing Disease: HIV and the Criminalization of Sickness | Paperback

by Trevor Hoppe (Author)


List Price: $32.95  
Price:  $32.93
You Save:  $0.02 (%)
Available:  Usually ships in 24 hours
FREE Shipping on Qualified Orders
» View Details


Binding:  Paperback
Publisher:  University of California Press
Edition:  1st Edition
Page Count:  288 Pages
Publication Date:  November 10, 2017
Sales Rank:  420543rd



EDITORIAL REVIEWS


Product Description
From the very beginning of the epidemic, AIDS was linked to punishment. Calls to punish people living with HIV—mostly stigmatized minorities—began before doctors had even settled on a name for the disease. Punishing Disease looks at how HIV was transformed from sickness to badness under the criminal law and investigates the consequences of inflicting penalties on people living with disease. Now that the door to criminalizing sickness is open, what other ailments will follow? With moves in state legislatures to extend HIV-specific criminal laws to include diseases such as hepatitis and meningitis, the question is more than academic.

SIMILAR PRODUCTS


Sociology of Deviant Behavior

Sociology of Deviant Behavior
by Marshall B. Clinard (Author), Robert F. Meier (Author)

Looking for a textbook with simplified terminology and endless study helps? SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANT BEHAVIOR hits the hot topics from terrorism to white-collar crime and shows you how sociological theory explains them. Now in its 13th edition, this textbook continues to be the best of its kind on the market. After you use its study guides and get the grade you need, you'll see why
Challenging Operations: Medical Reform and Resistance in Surgery

Challenging Operations: Medical Reform and Resistance in Surgery
by Katherine C. Kellogg (Author)

In 2003, in the face of errors and accidents caused by medical and surgical trainees, the American Council of Graduate Medical Education mandated a reduction in resident work hours to eighty per week. Over the course of two and a half years spent observing residents and staff surgeons trying to implement this new regulation, Katherine C. Kellogg discovered that resistance to it was both strong and successful—in fact, two of the three hospitals she studied failed to make the change....

The Common Place of Law: Stories from Everyday Life (Chicago Series in Law and Society)

The Common Place of Law: Stories from Everyday Life (Chicago Series in Law and Society)
by Patricia Ewick (Author), Susan S. Silbey (Author)

Why do some people not hesitate to call the police to quiet a barking dog in the middle of the night, while others accept the pain and losses associated with defective products, unsuccesful surgery, and discrimination? Patricia Ewick and Susan Silbey collected accounts of the law from more than four hundred people of diverse backgrounds in order to explore the different ways that people use and experience it. Their fascinating and original study identifies three common narratives of law that...
Infectious Ideas: U.S. Political Responses to the AIDS Crisis

Infectious Ideas: U.S. Political Responses to the AIDS Crisis
by Jennifer Brier (Author)

Viewing contemporary history from the perspective of the AIDS crisis, Jennifer Brier provides rich, new understandings of the United States' complex social and political trends in the post-1960s era. Brier describes how AIDS workers--in groups as disparate as the gay and lesbian press, AIDS service organizations, private philanthropies, and the State Department--influenced American politics, especially on issues such as gay and lesbian rights, reproductive health, racial justice, and health...
The Life and Death of ACT UP/LA: Anti-AIDS Activism in Los Angeles from the 1980s to the 2000s

The Life and Death of ACT UP/LA: Anti-AIDS Activism in Los Angeles from the 1980s to the 2000s
by Benita Roth (Author)

The Life and Death of ACT UP/LA explores the history of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, Los Angeles, part of the militant anti-AIDS movement of the 1980s and 1990s. ACT UP/LA battled government, medical, and institutional neglect of the AIDS epidemic, engaging in multi-targeted protest in Los Angeles and nationally. The book shows how appealing the direct action anti-AIDS activism was for people across the United States; as well as arguing the need to understand how the politics of place...
Jailcare: Finding the Safety Net for Women behind Bars

Jailcare: Finding the Safety Net for Women behind Bars
by Carolyn Sufrin (Author)

Thousands of pregnant women pass through our nation’s jails every year. What happens to them as they carry their pregnancies in a space of punishment? In this time when the public safety net is frayed, incarceration has become a central and racialized strategy for managing the poor. Using her ethnographic fieldwork and clinical work as an ob-gyn in a women’s jail, Carolyn Sufrin explores how jail has, paradoxically, become a place where women can find care. Focusing on the experiences of...

The Right to Maim: Debility, Capacity, Disability (ANIMA)

The Right to Maim: Debility, Capacity, Disability (ANIMA)
by Jasbir K. Puar (Author)

In The Right to Maim Jasbir K. Puar brings her pathbreaking work on the liberal state, sexuality, and biopolitics to bear on our understanding of disability. Drawing on a stunning array of theoretical and methodological frameworks, Puar uses the concept of “debility”—bodily injury and social exclusion brought on by economic and political factors—to disrupt the category of disability. She shows how debility, disability, and capacity together constitute an assemblage that states...
No Tea, No Shade: New Writings in Black Queer Studies

No Tea, No Shade: New Writings in Black Queer Studies
by E. Patrick Johnson (Editor)

The follow-up to the groundbreaking Black Queer Studies, the edited collection No Tea, No Shade brings together nineteen essays from the next generation of scholars, activists, and community leaders doing work on black gender and sexuality. Building on the foundations laid by the earlier volume, this collection's contributors speak new truths about the black queer experience while exemplifying the codification of black queer studies as a rigorous and important field of study....

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Confronting Stigma
Why do we harshly judge certain behaviors or conditions, making it harder to talk honestly about them? This hour, TED speakers confront stigmas around addiction, depression, HIV and sex work. Guests include journalist Johann Hari, TV/film producer and mental health advocate Nikki Webber Allen, HIV awareness educator Arik Hartmann, and sex worker and activist Juno Mac.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#461 Adhesives
This week we're discussing glue from two very different times. We speak with Dr. Jianyu Li about his research into a new type of medical adhesive. And Dr. Geeske Langejans explains her work making and investigating Stone Age and Paleolithic glues.