Nav: Home

Trust and Reciprocity: Interdisciplinary Lessons for Experimental Research (The Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust, Vol. 6) | Paperback

by Elinor Ostrom (Editor), James Walker (Editor)


List Price: $34.95  
Price:  $31.41
You Save:  $3.54 (10%)
Available:  Usually ships in 24 hours
FREE Shipping on Qualified Orders
» View Details


Binding:  Paperback
Publisher:  Russell Sage Foundation
Page Count:  423 Pages
Publication Date:  June 10, 2005
Sales Rank:  1187455th


FEATURES


• Used Book in Good Condition


EDITORIAL REVIEWS


Product Description
Trust is essential to economic and social transactions of all kinds, from choosing a marriage partner, to taking a job, and even buying a used car. The benefits to be gained from such transactions originate in the willingness of individuals to take risks by placing trust in others to behave in cooperative and non-exploitative ways. But how do humans decide whether or not to trust someone? Using findings from evolutionary psychology, game theory, and laboratory experiments, Trust and Reciprocity examines the importance of reciprocal relationships in explaining the origins of trust and trustworthy behavior. In Part I, contributor Russell Hardin argues that before one can understand trust one must account for the conditions that make someone trustworthy. Elinor Ostrom discusses evidence that individuals achieve outcomes better than those predicted by models of game theory based on purely selfish motivations. In Part II, the book takes on the biological foundations of trust. Frans de Waal illustrates the deep evolutionary roots of trust and reciprocity with examples from the animal world, such as the way chimpanzees exchange social services like grooming and sharing. Other contributors look at the links between evolution, cognition, and behavior. Kevin McCabe examines how the human mind processes the complex commitments that reciprocal relationships require, summarizing brain imaging experiments that suggest the frontal lobe region is activated when humans try to cooperate with their fellow humans. Acknowledging the importance of game theory as a theoretical model for examining strategic relationships, in Part III the contributors tackle the question of how simple game theoretic models must be extended to explain behavior in situations involving trust and reciprocity. Reviewing a range of experimental studies, Karen Cook and Robin Cooper conclude that trust is dependent on the complex relationships between incentives and individual characteristics, and must be examined in light of the social contexts which promote or erode trust. As an example, Catherine Eckel and Rick Wilson explore how people's cues, such as facial expressions and body language, affect whether others will trust them. The divergent views in this volume are unified by the basic conviction that humans gain through the development of trusting relationships. Trust and Reciprocity advances our understanding of what makes people willing or unwilling to take the risks involved in building such relationships and why. A Volume in the Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust

SIMILAR PRODUCTS


Governing the Commons: The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action (Canto Classics)

Governing the Commons: The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action (Canto Classics)
by Elinor Ostrom (Author)
Trust in Society (Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust)

Trust in Society (Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust)
by Karen Cook (Editor)
Understanding Institutional Diversity (Princeton Paperbacks)

Understanding Institutional Diversity (Princeton Paperbacks)
by Elinor Ostrom (Author)
Cooperation Without Trust? (Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust)

Cooperation Without Trust? (Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust)
by Karen S. Cook (Author), Russell Hardin (Author), Margaret Levi (Author)
The Future of the Commons (Institute of Economic Affairs: Occasional Papers)

The Future of the Commons (Institute of Economic Affairs: Occasional Papers)
by Elinor Ostrom (Author)
Whom Can We Trust?: How Groups, Networks, and Institutions Make Trust Possible (The Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust)

Whom Can We Trust?: How Groups, Networks, and Institutions Make Trust Possible (The Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust)
by Karen S. Cook (Editor), Margaret Levi (Editor), Russell Hardin (Editor)
Trust and Trustworthiness (Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust)

Trust and Trustworthiness (Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust)
by Russell Hardin (Author)
Understanding Knowledge as a Commons (MIT Press): From Theory to Practice (The MIT Press)

Understanding Knowledge as a Commons (MIT Press): From Theory to Practice (The MIT Press)
by Charlotte Hess (Editor)
Society and Economy: Framework and Principles

Society and Economy: Framework and Principles
by Mark Granovetter (Author)
Signals and Boundaries: Building Blocks for Complex Adaptive Systems (The MIT Press)

Signals and Boundaries: Building Blocks for Complex Adaptive Systems (The MIT Press)
by John H Holland (Author)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Unintended Consequences
Human innovation has transformed the way we live, often for the better. But as our technologies grow more powerful, so do their consequences. This hour, TED speakers explore technology's dark side. Guests include writer and artist James Bridle, historians Yuval Noah Harari and Edward Tenner, internet security strategist Yasmin Green, and journalist Kashmir Hill.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#499 Technology, Work and The Future (Rebroadcast)
This week, we're thinking about how rapidly advancing technology will change our future, our work, and our well-being. We speak to Richard and Daniel Susskind about their book "The Future of Professions: How Technology Will Transform the Work of Human Experts" about the impacts technology may have on professional work. And Nicholas Agar comes on to talk about his book "The Sceptical Optimist" and the ways new technologies will affect our perceptions and well-being.