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Earth's Magnetic Field Secrets: An Illusion Mixed With Reality | Paperback

by Dennis Brooks (Author)

List Price: $16.13  
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Binding:  Paperback
Publisher:  Speedy Publishing Books
Page Count:  80 Pages
Publication Date:  March 30, 2015
Sales Rank:  2712294th


Product Description
The Old Theory Until now, there was only one theory regarding the source of Earth's magnetic field, which is the internal dynamo theory. This theory was accepted because it offered the best explanation at the time. Also, much research has been done to support the theory. According to the internal dynamo theory, a dynamo near the center of the planet generates the current that produces the magnetic field. This dynamo would be in the liquid outer core of the planet. It would produce the magnetic axis and project it from the planet. The axis would expand and spread the magnetic field around the planet. This theory also suggests that the internal dynamo is sustaining itself by using fuel from Earth's core. The internal dynamo theory has changed over the years. At first scientists thought that a bar magnet was in the center of the planet and the compass needle pointed to the poles of that magnet. This made perfect sense at the time because we can see that the same thing happens when we put a compass near a bar magnet. The Bar Magnet In The Sun image demonstrates the idea of the bar magnet theory. However, this example shows the bar magnet imbedded within the sun because just like the planets, the sun also has a magnetic field, which is more complex than Earth's magnetic field. Scientists have tried to use the internal dynamo theory to explain the magnetic fields of all the planets, some moons, and the sun. However, the old model does not work for the sun, moon, and other planets. The bar magnet concept lasted a long time as the main theory regarding the source of Earth's magnetic field. However, while trying to apply it to other cases, scientists found problems with the theory. Over the years, they discovered that a bar magnet could not hold magnetism above the temperature of 770 degrees centigrade because high heat destroys magnetism. This caused the theory to gradually evolve over time.


Earth Magnetism: A Guided Tour through Magnetic Fields (Complementary Science)

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