Nav: Home

Mediterranean diet may help preserve the kidney health of transplant recipients

January 02, 2020

Highlight
  • In a study of kidney transplant recipients, those with higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet were less likely to experience kidney function loss.
Washington, DC (January 2, 2020) -- A new study indicates that following the Mediterranean diet may help kidney transplant recipients maintain transplant kidney function. The findings appear in an upcoming issue of CJASN.

Despite improvements in the survival of transplanted kidneys in the early years after transplantation, loss of kidney function within 10 years still occurs in more than one-third of recipients. António Gomes-Neto, MD (University of Groningen, in the Netherlands) and his colleagues investigated whether adhering to the Mediterranean diet--which focuses on high intake of fish, fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and olive oil together with lower intake of dairy and meat products--might help protect transplant recipients' kidney health.

For the study, 632 adult kidney transplant recipients with a functioning donor kidney for at least one year completed a food-related questionnaire, and adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed using a 9-point score.

During an average follow-up of 5.2 years, 119 recipients experienced kidney function decline (76 of whom developed kidney failure). The Mediterranean Diet Score was inversely associated with kidney function decline and kidney failure. Each 2-point higher score was associated with a 29% lower risk of kidney function decline and a 32% lower risk of kidney failure.

"Increasing scientific evidence has demonstrated health benefits of the Mediterranean Diet on cardiovascular and kidney health. In this study, we show that kidney transplant recipients with higher adherence to the Mediterranean Diet are less likely to experience function loss of their kidney transplant," said Dr. Gomes-Neto.
-end-
Study co-authors include Maryse C.J. Osté, MD; Camilo G. Sotomayor, MD; Else van den Berg, MD, PhD; Johanna M. Geleijnse, PhD; Stefan P. Berger, MD, PhD; Reinold O.B. Gans, MD, PhD; Stephan J.L. Bakker, MD, PhD; and Gerjan J. Navis, MD, PhD.

Disclosures: The authors reported no financial disclosures.

The article, entitled "Mediterranean Style Diet and Kidney Function Loss in Kidney Transplant Recipients," will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on January 2, 2020, doi: 10.2215/CJN.06710619.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Since 1966, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) has been leading the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients. ASN has more than 21,000 members representing 131 countries. For more information, visit http://www.asn-online.org.

American Society of Nephrology

Related Kidney Transplant Articles:

Kidney transplant, the cost of accounting for patients' preferences
Taking into account patients' preferences can help speed up the organ allocation process and improve the life quality of the recipients, as shown by a joint study conducted by Ca' Foscari University and the University of Padua
New hope for kidney revival for transplant
Cell therapy delivered directly to the kidney can revive a 'marginal' organ, improving function and could offer new hope for providing more kidneys for transplant.
Are kidney transplant patients at higher risk? The European experience
The risk of death is relatively high in kidney transplant patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19.
The economic burden of kidney transplant failure in the United States
A recent analysis published in the American Journal of Transplantation estimates that for the average US patient who has undergone kidney transplantation, failure of the transplanted organ (graft failure) will impose additional medical costs of $78,079 and a loss of 1.66 quality-adjusted life years.
Mixed chimerism improves long-term kidney transplant outlook
Mixed chimerism - the continued mixing of donor and recipient blood cells following a transplant of blood progenitor cells - could improve outcomes for kidney transplant recipients, according to a new clinical study in about 50 patients.
Kidney paired donation is an excellent option for transplant candidates
An analysis compared transplant recipients who received kidneys through national kidney paired donation and those who received kidneys from other living donors (such as relatives, friends or other paired exchange mechanisms).
Mediterranean diet may help preserve the kidney health of transplant recipients
In a study of kidney transplant recipients, those with higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet were less likely to experience kidney function loss.
New blood test can detect rejection by antibodies after kidney transplant
A group of European scientists led by KU Leuven has found a biomarker that can identify patients with symptoms of kidney rejection symptoms after a transplant as a result of antibodies.
Measuring quality of life after pediatric kidney transplant
After receiving a kidney transplant, children may experience worrisome quality-of-life changes that underscore the importance of screening transplant recipients for psychosocial function, according to Children's research presented during the 10th Congress of the International Pediatric Transplant Association.
dnDSA and ethnicity linked with thickening of blood vessels after kidney transplant
Children who developed anti-human leukocyte antibodies against their donor kidney, known as de novo donor-specific antibodies, were more likely to experience carotid intima-media thickening than those without these antibodies, according to preliminary research presented May 7, 2019, during the 10th Congress of the International Pediatric Transplant Association.
More Kidney Transplant News and Kidney Transplant Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Debbie Millman: Designing Our Lives
From prehistoric cave art to today's social media feeds, to design is to be human. This hour, designer Debbie Millman guides us through a world made and remade–and helps us design our own paths.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#574 State of the Heart
This week we focus on heart disease, heart failure, what blood pressure is and why it's bad when it's high. Host Rachelle Saunders talks with physician, clinical researcher, and writer Haider Warraich about his book "State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science, and Future of Cardiac Disease" and the ails of our hearts.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Insomnia Line
Coronasomnia is a not-so-surprising side-effect of the global pandemic. More and more of us are having trouble falling asleep. We wanted to find a way to get inside that nighttime world, to see why people are awake and what they are thinking about. So what'd Radiolab decide to do?  Open up the phone lines and talk to you. We created an insomnia hotline and on this week's experimental episode, we stayed up all night, taking hundreds of calls, spilling secrets, and at long last, watching the sunrise peek through.   This episode was produced by Lulu Miller with Rachael Cusick, Tracie Hunte, Tobin Low, Sarah Qari, Molly Webster, Pat Walters, Shima Oliaee, and Jonny Moens. Want more Radiolab in your life? Sign up for our newsletter! We share our latest favorites: articles, tv shows, funny Youtube videos, chocolate chip cookie recipes, and more. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.