ATS issues joint statement on key issues and recommendations for critical care research

January 03, 2012

To reduce mortality and improve patient care in the nation's ICUs, a task force formed by the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC), in conjunction with the US Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group (USCIITG) has recommended that research in the field become less fragmented and better account for patient heterogeneity and the complexity of critical illness.

The CCSC comprises the American Thoracic Society (ATS), the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN), the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM).

The task force recommendations were published in the January 1, 2012 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care.

The task force was formed because identifying common challenges and establishing priorities in the field of critical care research have proven difficult, given the broad range of stakeholders involved in the rapidly growing field.

"Critical care is one of the fastest growing areas in medicine, accounting for approximately $80 billion in healthcare expenditures in the United States annually," said the lead ATS representative on the task force, Polly Parsons, MD, chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. "This enormous cost, along with the high mortality rates seen in intensive care units, point to the urgent need for new treatments and systems of care, implementation of new research findings and identification of priorities for critical care research."

Key themes and challenges identified by the task force include the need to alter the fragmented approach to critical care research and more effectively link diverse research areas, the need to account for the complexity of critical illness and injury and patient heterogeneity in research, and the need for an enhanced clinical research infrastructure.

General principles for research priorities in critical care identified by the task force include:Key critical care research priorities were identified in the specific areas of:In addition to these areas, the task force recommended process improvements in:Dr. Parsons noted that the increasing demand for resources in response to outcome challenges has created a need for greater investment in critical care research. "These recommendations will help facilitate the progress of research across the spectrum of critical care," she said. "Their implementation will require new initiatives, shifts in national research priorities and enhanced cooperation within the critical care community. The agenda for critical care research outlined in these recommendations provides a blueprint for future initiatives."
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To read the article in full, please visit http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/content/185/1/96.abstract.

About the American Journal of Respiratory Research and Critical Care Medicine:

With an impact factor of 10.191, the AJRRCM is a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Thoracic Society. It aims to publish the most innovative science and the highest quality reviews, practice guidelines and statements in the pulmonary, critical care and sleep-related fields.

Founded in 1905, the American Thoracic Society is the world's leading medical association dedicated to advancing pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. The Society's 15,000 members prevent and fight respiratory disease around the globe through research, education, patient care and advocacy.

American Thoracic Society

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