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Special issue of Future Oncology highlights the field of Psycho-oncology

January 03, 2017

The Future Science Group (FSG) published journal, Future Oncology, has released a special issue that examines the field of psycho-oncology, which aims to bring together the biomedical and psychosocial aspects of cancer care.

As cancer research has developed and improved, therapies have increased in their efficacy, while at the same time, levels of toxicity have reduced. Likewise, there have been great strides in attention to patient experience, quality of life, psychosocial adaptation, mental health and in social advocacy against stigma associated with cancer. The aim now is to create a collaborative space between these two entities of cancer care.

"Specialties may be making progress in parallel, rather than jointly and collaboratively. For instance, new trials of targeted treatments offering the promise of increased survival for advanced melanoma are proceeding apace, yet the high rates of associated distress have received little systematic consideration," Alex King (Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK), guest editor for the special issue explained. "We can now bring concepts, evidence and solutions from psycho-oncology to the broader oncology audience, and develop opportunities to sustain connections at multiple levels."

The special issue contains a range of content with highlights covering both the importance of connections between cancer patients and significant people in their private life, as well as the connections between clinical specialties necessary to provide truly state-of-the-art supportive care. Highlights include research articles appraising psychosocial support for patients across generations, with respect to their relationship with peers and carers; a special report outlining challenges faced in psycho-oncology in the UK, terms of patient quality service quality and outcomes; a perspective examining the history and future direction of the field in terms of survivorship; an editorial highlighting the potential for psychological interventions to influence biophysical parameters, specifically, interventions targeting stress in post-surgical breast cancer patients can show promising results in the short and long term; and commentaries from leading figures demonstrating the multi-disciplinary aspect of this field and how psycho-oncology should be a key facet of integrative oncology.

Sebastian Dennis-Beron, commissioning editor for Future Oncology commented: "It has been a pleasure working with renowned experts in the psycho-oncology field to publish this timely special issue highlighting the importance of developing of a multi-disciplinary approach to cancer care, from both social and biomedical standpoints."
-end-
The issue is available online here: http://www.futuremedicine.com/toc/fon/12/24

King's foreword as guest editor is free to read, here: http://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/full/10.2217/fon-2016-0463

About Future Oncology

Future Oncology is a MEDLINE-indexed journal, with an impact factor of 2.129. The journal covers the latest scientific and clinical issues, together with the economic and policy issues of relevance to oncologists. The journal delivers essential information in concise, at-a-glance article formats - vital in delivering information to an increasingly time-constrained community.

About Future Science Group

Founded in 2001, Future Science Group (FSG) is a progressive publisher focused on breakthrough medical, biotechnological, and scientific research. FSG's portfolio includes two imprints, Future Science and Future Medicine. In addition to this core publishing business, FSG develops specialist eCommunities. Key titles and sites include Bioanalysis Zone, Epigenomics, Nanomedicine and the award-winning Regenerative Medicine. The aim of FSG is to service the advancement of clinical practice and drug research by enhancing the efficiency of communications among clinicians, researchers and decision-makers, and by providing innovative solutions to their information needs. This is achieved through a customer-centric approach, use of new technologies, products that deliver value-for-money and uncompromisingly high standards. http://www.futuresciencegroup.com

Future Science Group

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