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Gut microbiome in digestive health: a new frontier in research

January 04, 2019

Bethesda, MD (Jan. 3, 2019)-- Research on the gut microbiome is one of the most promising areas of science today. In a new special issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) has taken the deep-dive into the gut microbiome that both scientists and the public are looking for to help them better understand the effects of the microbiome on health and disease. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology is the clinical practice journal of the AGA.

Research published in the special issue, "The Gut Microbiome & Digestive Health - A New Frontier," studies, analyzes and interprets gut microbiome data for clinicians, examines the possible role of the microbiome in digestive disease, and takes a robust look at microbiome-directed therapies for the past, present and future. Additionally, this issue provides a clinical context for translational and basic researchers engaged in the microbiome, facilitating further research that makes meaningful progress towards unravelling the mysteries of some of our most complex diseases and offers new therapeutic options that would allow us to safely and effectively improve patient outcomes.

Learn more about gut microbiome analytics and how the gut microbiome relates to aspects of nutrition, probiotics, the liver and gut-brain axis at http://www.gastro.org/microbiome. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology also hosts a specially curated collection on the microbiome, through which you can stay abreast of the latest research published and sign up for alerts.

Visit the AGA Center for Gut Microbiome Research & Education for the latest in research and education and to learn more about the AGA's NIH-funded Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) National Registry. AGA's GI Patient Center also host specific patient-education pages written by AGA experts, on the related topics of probiotics and fecal microbiota transplantation, presented in an easy-to-read and easy-to-understand format for all patients.

Introduction to the issue Microbiome in specific diseasesMicrobiome-directed therapies: past, present and future
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About the AGA Institute

The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) is the trusted voice of the GI community. Founded in 1897, AGA has grown to include more than 16,000 members from around the globe who are involved in all aspects of the science, practice and advancement of gastroenterology. https://www.gastro.org/ .

About Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology

The mission of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology is to provide readers with a broad spectrum of themes in clinical gastroenterology and hepatology. This monthly peer-reviewed journal includes original articles as well as scholarly reviews, with the goal that all articles published will be immediately relevant to the practice of gastroenterology and hepatology. For more information, visit http://www.cghjournal.org.

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