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Far-out, early-stage tech at CES 2016 Eureka Park

January 05, 2016

Nearly two dozen small businesses supported by the National Science Foundation will demonstrate pre-market consumer technologies at CES® 2016 Eureka Park, a global stage dedicated to up-and-coming technology born from fundamental science and engineering innovation.

NSF co-founded Eureka Park in 2012 to help emerging technology ready for commercialization gain marketplace exposure by giving NSF grantees access to potential partners and investors at the premier consumer electronics tradeshow. This year's ideas arena is co-presented by Techstars.

The 2016 exhibitors will showcase new approaches to energy-efficient technologies, the Internet of Things, robotics, virtual reality and more. The technologies have more than simply a "cool" factor - they have the potential to help drive the U.S. economy, enhance national security and advance American global leadership.

The NSF-support exhibitors are funded by the NSF Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) programs. Learn more about how NSF turns on the lights for thousands of startups each year.

WHEN: Jan. 6-9, 2016

WHERE: Eureka Park, Tech West, Sands Expo, Hall G, Las Vegas

Can't make it to Vegas? Our media guide is online.

WHAT: Small businesses, startups and spinoffs with pre-market technology will demo their prototypes and proofs-of-concept for passers-by looking for fresh ideas.

WHO: NSF-supported exhibits in Eureka Park include:

Assistive Technologies & Robotics

Empire Robotics Inc.
Polymer Braille Inc.
Reach Bionics Inc.
SynTouch
VisiSonics Corporation

Audio & Acoustics

Asius Technologies
TAG Optics Inc.

Biomedical

AventuSoft
PuraCath Medical
Omnity

Energy

ARGIL Inc.
Chirp Microsystems Inc.

Internet of Things & Sensors

femtoScale
NOA Inc.
PFP Cybersecurity
Stratio Inc.
TRX Systems Inc.
Veristride

Virtual Reality & Simulations

Impulsonic Inc.

Engineering Research Centers

Advanced Self-Powered Systems of Integrated Sensors and Technologies (ASSIST)
Get a sample of NSF-funded exhibitors on NSF's YouTube channel.

Visit NSF booth #80146 for more information.
-end-


National Science Foundation

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