Nav: Home

A broken bone may lead to widespread body pain -- not just at the site of the fracture

January 05, 2016

Breaking a major bone may increase risk of widespread chronic body pain in later life, a new study has found.

Researchers at the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit (MRC LEU), University of Southampton, found that men and women who had a spine fracture and women who had a hip fracture were more than twice as likely to experience long term widespread pain as those who had not had a fracture.

Lead researcher Nicholas Harvey, Professor of Rheumatology and Clinical Epidemiology, said: "The causes of chronic widespread pain are poorly characterised, and this study is the first to demonstrate an association with past fracture. If confirmed in further studies, these findings might help us to reduce the burden of chronic pain following such fractures."

The study, published in Archives of Osteoporosis, used the UK Biobank cohort of 500,000 adults aged between 40 and 69 years old, to investigate associations between a past history of fracture affecting upper and lower limb, spine or hip and the presence of chronic widespread body pain. The researchers considered possible effects of a wide range of further factors, including participant diet, lifestyle and body build, and, importantly, measures of psychological health.

They found that the risk of chronic widespread body pain was increased if participants reported having a past fracture, especially spine and hip fractures.

Professor Harvey added: "Chronic widespread pain is common, and leads to substantial health related problems and disability. Past studies have demonstrated an increased risk of chronic widespread pain following traumatic events, but none have directly linked to skeletal fractures."

Professor Cyrus Cooper, Director of the MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, added: "This study illustrates the importance for the University of Southampton and MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit in leading large, multi-centre analyses on this internationally leading UK Biobank dataset. The findings will be built upon in further analyses that capitalise on the genetic and intensive musculoskeletal phenotyping components of the study in which we continue to play an important role."
-end-


University of Southampton

Related Fracture Articles:

Assessment of bone density and fracture history can predict long-term fracture risk
Factors such as low bone density and previous fractures are commonly used to predict an individual's risk of experiencing a fracture over the next 10 years.
Post-fracture care: Do we need to educate patients rather than doctors?
This multicenter, randomized controlled trial involved 436 women, aged 50-85 years, who had attended hospital for treatment of a fragility fracture of the wrist or upper arm.
Less than half of elderly hip fracture patients take vitamin D supplements
Despite national recommendations for daily vitamin D intake, a new study presented today at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) found that just 45.7 percent of patients reported consistently taking vitamin D supplements following a hip fracture, a known treatment and preventative strategy for osteoporosis.
Stop using ultrasound to speed up fracture healing, advise experts
New evidence suggests that receiving low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) to speed up bone healing after fracture has little or no impact on pain or recovery time, say a panel of international experts in The BMJ today.
Antidepressant use increases hip fracture risk among elderly
Antidepressant use nearly doubles the risk of hip fracture among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland.
Can DXA be used to predict fracture risk in people with diabetes?
Data on skeletal parameters and techniques readily available from DXA scanning are reviewed in terms of their utility in routine clinical practice for predicting fracture risk in diabetes.
Sooner on your feet after hip fracture
An already available drug can help patients get back on their feet more rapidly after a hip fracture, according to an international study published in the Journal of Bone Joint Surgery.
Antihypertensive medications and fracture risk: Is there an association?
Further examination of randomized clinical trial data suggests that thiazide diuretics to treat hypertension may be associated with lower risk of hip and pelvic fractures compared with some other antihypertensive medications, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.
Popular ultrasound treatment does not improve fracture healing
Low intensity ultrasound after surgical repair of a bone fracture is a popular treatment to improve recovery, but it doesn't work, says a large international study led by McMaster University researchers.
Towards increasingly personalized fracture risk assessment
An ultrasound method developed at the University of Eastern Finland constitutes a step in the direction of an increasingly personalized and earlier assessment of fracture risk, which could be easily and cost-efficiently applied in osteoporosis diagnostics and follow-up in basic health care.

Related Fracture Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...