Nav: Home

WSU geologist uses satellite imagery to study surface water quality within Ohio River watershed

January 06, 2005

A Wright State University research scientist is using satellite imagery to evaluate water quality within the streams and rivers of the Ohio River watershed.

Abinash Agrawal, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Department of Geological Sciences, recently received a $20,000 grant from NASA as part of the a $39,000 project that began in late 2003.

"This is a new field of remote sensing that uses satellite pictures to examine land surfaces and land-use patterns within the Ohio River watershed, which includes large portions of Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky," explained Agrawal, whose training encompasses geochemistry and environmental engineering. The study includes the urban areas of Dayton, Columbus, Cincinnati and Louisville.

Agrawal said the satellite photos are a powerful tool to examine the water quality in streams, lakes and rivers because the area involved totals more than 200,000 square miles. "This would take hundreds of people and cost millions of dollars without the use of this space-age technology," he said.

The Wright State geologist said the goal of the research is "to analyze the cause-and- effect relationship between land use and stream water quality in the watershed. We want to examine how human activity (which includes urbanization, agricultural expansion and deforestation) affects the quality of stream water."

A faculty member since 1995, Agrawal has 15 years of experience in studying wetlands, water quality and groundwater contamination. He became involved in this project during a recent sabbatical research opportunity at NASA's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. The grant from NASA is through the Ohio Space Grant Consortium.
-end-


Wright State University

Related Water Quality Articles:

Study quantifies effect of 'legacy phosphorus' in reduced water quality
For decades, phosphorous has accumulated in Wisconsin soils. Though farmers have taken steps to reduce the quantity of the agricultural nutrient applied to and running off their fields, a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison reveals that a 'legacy' of abundant soil phosphorus in the Yahara watershed of Southern Wisconsin has a large, direct and long-lasting impact on water quality.
New standards for better water quality in Europe
The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) is due to be revised by 2019.
Investigating the impact of 'legacy sediments' on water quality
University of Delaware researcher Shreeram Inamdar has been awarded a $499,500 grant from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) to determine if stream-bank legacy sediments are significant sources of nutrients to surface waters and how they may influence microbial processes and nutrient cycling in aquatic ecosystems.
Adaptive management of soil conservation is essential to improving water quality
The quality of our rivers and lakes could be placed under pressure from harmful levels of soluble phosphorus, despite well-intended measures to reduce soil erosion and better manage and conserve farmland for crop production, a new study shows.
Big data approach to water quality applied at shale drilling sites
A computer program is diving deep into water quality data from Pennsylvania, helping scientists detect potential environmental impacts of Marcellus Shale gas drilling.
More Water Quality News and Water Quality Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.