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This week from AGU: Blogs from #AGU15, ocean sounds & winds, & 5 new research papers

January 06, 2016

GeoSpace
Blog posts about research presented at the 2015 AGU Fall Meeting:

Appliance upgrades that save the most water, energy and cost

A new analysis helps consumers choose which appliances to swap for more efficient models and save money in the process, with some surprising results.

Himalayan glacial lake threatens to flood Buddhist holy city

On the road to Kanchenjunga - the second highest peak in the Himalaya and third highest in the world - travelers pass through the Indian village of Chungthang. Above lies an unstable glacial lake: meltwater from South Lhonak Glacier pools on top of the ice, creating a lake with an icy floor that is dammed by a rim of rock.

Eos.org

Using sounds from the ocean to measure winds in the stratosphere

Stratospheric winds deflect acoustic waves from the oceans. With the right data and the math to analyze them, these waves tell us about the weather aloft.

New research papers

A new spiral model for Saturn's magnetosphere, Geophysical Research Letters

A possible transoceanic tsunami directed toward the U.S. west coast from the Semidi segment, Alaska convergent margin, Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems

Convective and stratiform components of the precipitation-moisture relationship, Geophysical Research Letters

Ship-borne observations of atmospheric black carbon aerosol particles over the Arctic Ocean, Bering Sea, and North Pacific Ocean during September 2014, Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres

Questions on the existence, persistence, and mechanical effects of a very small melt fraction in the asthenosphere, Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems
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